Asian Studies, Global (AAS)

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AAS 200 | ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the creation of Asian America by first and second-generation Asian migrants to the Americans from the 1840s to World War II. The course provides a historical, legal, social and cultural framework for understanding the resurgence of Asian migration since the 1960s.

AAS 202 | ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will serve as an overview of Asian American literature in a socio-historical context. Special emphasis will be placed on tracing the various paradigms through which these works have been produced, from texts written prior to the movement towards self-determination during the 1960s; to works identified with the "cultural nationalism" promoted during the 1960s and 1970s; to the pluralism of the 1980s which explored how gender, sexual orientation, and class complicate earlier essentialist conceptions of racial identity; and finally to the transnational and diasporic interests of the 1990s. Texts covered will include primarily fiction (novels and short stories), but also critical essays, plays, movies, and poetry.

AAS 203 | ASIAN AMERICAN ARTS AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine Asian American arts and cultural productions in relation to the histories of people and groups with roots in Asia and the Pacific. The course will focus on contemporary visual arts from the emergence of Asian American movements in the 1960's and 1970's, to the multiculturalism of the 1980's and 1990's to our present transnational moment. Formerly AAS 201.

AAS 205 | GLOBAL ASIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

From ancient and modern perspectives, Global Asia introduces the artistic, cultural, economic, philosophical, political and religious transformation of Asian societies and peoples across space and time. A visual and multimedia approach complements literature on core ideas and practices. Creative and interactive learning methods are included.

AAS 210 | ASIAN ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to major developments of art and architecture across Asian cultures including South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, and East Asia and their counterparts in America. This course examines not only painting, sculpture, and architecture, but also gardens, ceramics, and prints. Special emphasis will be placed on religious arts of Buddhism and Hinduism, along with landscape and figural painting. Cross-listed with HAA 115.

AAS 211 | BUDDHIST ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the traditional visual culture of the Buddhist world, examining art as a reflection of religious belief and practice. The works come from South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and America. An emphasis is placed on painting, sculpture, and architecture made for or related to Buddhist practice. Cross-listed with HAA 220.

AAS 214 | JAPANESE ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a chronological survey of premodern Japanese art, from the prehistoric era to the Meiji period (1868-1911). Topics covered include painting, sculpture, and architecture, as well as decorative arts, prints, and garden design. Special attention is given to Buddhist and Shinto religious arts, along with screen painting and woodblock prints. Cross-listed with HAA 216.

AAS 215 | INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REGIONAL INEQUALITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course charts the political, social and economic transformation of the developing countries (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Caribbean, Pacific Islands) into a global economy dominated by the 'developed' countries (North America, Europe and Japan). This process, termed 'GLOBALIZATION,' results from the operation of the global market mechanism, the activities of Transnational Corporations (TNCs) and the programs of the International Financial Institutions (IFIs). Cross-listed with GEO 215.

AAS 216 | CHINESE ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a chronological survey of premodern Chinese art from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Special attention is given to sculpture and painting, but architecture and ceramics are also covered. There is an emphasis on prehistoric bronze vessels, Buddhist sculpture, and landscape painting of the Song through Qing periods. Cross-listed with HAA 215.

AAS 217 | ARTS OF INDIA AND THE HIMALAYAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a chronological survey of premodern arts of the subcontinent of South Asia and the Himalayas. We start with the Indus Valley Civilization and move through the nineteenth century, including Mughal arts. Special attention is given to the emergence of figural imagery in Buddhist and Hindu sculptural arts, and the development of religious architectural forms from early stupas and cave temples to later shrines. Cross-listed with HAA 217.

AAS 218 | ARTS OF THE SILK ROAD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the visual history of the Silk Road, focusing on works of art and architecture created in Central Asia. We not only consider the prehistoric, ancient and medieval arts of this region, but we also investigate the modern development of a romanticized notion of the Silk Road and the imperial interest in acquiring treasures from the Silk Road. Today we frequently hear about the legacy of the Silk Road in promoting multicultural exchange. However, the Silk Road has long been affected by the expansionist agendas of empires. From the time of Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.E.) through the period of Genghis Khan (1162-1227) and on, there have been military leaders who have led their armies into Silk Road lands seeking territory, riches, and glory. Cross-listed with HAA 218.

AAS 220 | AMERICAN BUDDHISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course critically analyzes the origins of Buddhism in the United States in order to fully understand how and why Buddhism has flourished in Asian and White American communities, and to understand the conflict and controversy surrounding the racial dynamics of religious choice. Cross-listed with AMS 220.

AAS 222 | RELIGION AND CONFLICT IN SOUTH ASIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Religion has become central to conflict in contemporary South Asia. This course examines the relationship between religion and conflict both within and between nations in South Asia. It will examine how religion fuels conflict as well as how religion is used to find a nonviolent resolution to conflict. It will also analyze how religion is used to challenge and resist victimization, marginalization, silencing, and indeed violence during conflict. Finally, the course will examine how the cultural politics of class, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality constitute and are constituted by religion.

AAS 223 | TALES OF INDIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Before the modern nation-states of India and Pakistan came into being, the term "India" referred to the South Asian region, a region that has been and is the home of many cultures and societies. These cultures have also reached beyond the region to create rich and paradoxical diaspora experiences in Europe and the Americas. Tales of India will explore a variety of literatures, ancient and contemporary, that illuminate the worlds of South Asian peoples in their homelands and in the transnational life of the diaspora. Themes will include love, power, religious meaning/religious identity, and cultural difference.

AAS 224 | HINDU THOUGHT AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An exploration of Hinduism as a civilization whose key reference points are religious in the sense understood in the West (ritual and transcendence), yet which finds expression in a "high culture" of literary works, political and social theory, art and architecture, music and dance, and folk and popular stories, songs and plays. Cross-listed with REL 242.

AAS 225 | RELIGION AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT: SOCIALLY ENGAGED BUDDHISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An investigation of the ways in which various religious traditions engage the social order. Traditions, persons and movements that form the focus of the course will vary from section to section (in this case the focus is on Buddhism). The course will integrate theory and practice in studying forms of religious engagement. All students will perform some service to a community or within a community organization or agency.

Sophomore standing or above is a prerequisite for this class.

AAS 226 | ETHICAL WORLDS: MORAL ISSUES ACROSS CULTURES: ATOM BOMB DISCOURSE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An exploration of religion and ethics from a comparative and international perspective. Ethical dimensions of diverse world traditions (in this case the development and use of atomic weaponry) will be investigated within their own particular historical and cultural contexts, and students will be asked to consider and evaluate their own ethical orientations in the light of these studies.

AAS 233 | THE RISE OF MODERN CHINA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the history of Chinese civilization from the 18th century to the present. We will survey the height of the authority of the Qing Imperial government, its dissolution in the 19th century, and the creation of a revolutionary China in the 20th century. Topics include the Opium War and China's foreign relations, the introduction of Westernized technology and education, and the rise of Communism under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Also considers the ways in which our contemporary understanding of China is formed by recent developments in the media - Chinese news and film. Cross-listed with HST 233.

AAS 241 | RELIGION IN CHINESE HISTORY, SOCIETY, AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An exploration of the Chinese religious landscape, focusing on social and practical dimensions of Chinese religion, such as state rituals and private cults, liturgies and individual practices of Taoist priests and adepts, politico-religious ideas that inspired popular messianic movements throughout Chinese history, and interrelations of Buddhist and Taoist clergies and institutions in the state. Cross-listed with REL 241.

AAS 242 | LITERATURE AND RELIGION IN CHINA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An exploration of religious themes reflected in diverse forms of Chinese story literature from ancient to contemporary times. Cross-listed with REL 248.

AAS 243 | BUDDHIST THOUGHT IN CULTURAL CONTEXT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An exploration of the Buddhist tradition, using original sources, from its beginnings in ancient India to a world religion with strong roots in the US. Students will discover how Buddhism interacts with cultures from Sri Lanka and Thailand to China, Japan and Tibet. Although this course is online, students in the region will have the opportunity to practice meditation at a Chicago zendo and tour the Buddhist art at the Chicago Art Institute. Cross-listed with REL 243.

AAS 244 | TRADITIONS OF CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Promotes an understanding of Chinese worldview and life in the perspective of the common Chinese people from ancient to modern times. Based on historical and modern texts in translation, some historical and ethnographic studies, as well as visual and aural materials, the course explores gender and generational relations and conflicts, ancestor veneration, the worlds of ghosts and gods, festivals, art, and entertainment, but also aspects of misery and social unrest. Although the course will draw largely on popular and entertaining sources, it will also pay attention to historical developments, the relationship between popular and elite traditions, as well as sociological and anthropological issues arising from these contexts. Cross-listed with REL 246.

AAS 245 | RELIGION IN JAPANESE HISTORY, SOCIETY, AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Explores the specific interplay between religion and culture in Japan. Taking historical and cultural factors into account, it considers prehistoric Japanese religion, ancient imperial myths, the assimilation of Buddhism, Confucianism, and continental (Chinese/Korean) culture, the religious and aesthetic worlds of the court nobility and the warrior class, popular mountain cults, the revival and systematization of Shinto, the impact of western culture, Japanese ultra-nationalism, and the religious situation in the post-war period. Cross-listed with REL 245.

AAS 246 | ASIAN FOREIGN POLICY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys the international relations of selected Asian countries. For each country, the course presents the basic historical background shaping foreign relations, introduces the external and domestic influences on foreign policy, and identifies emerging international challenges. It examines both the economic and military-security dimensions of Asian foreign relations. Cross-listed with PSC 246.

AAS 247 | LITERATURE AND RELIGION IN JAPAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Focuses on the pervasive influence of religious thought and sentiment on Japanese literature from ancient to modern times and explores the intricate relationship between religion, aesthetics, and the arts in Japanese culture. Considers original works including ancient Japanese mythology and poetry, the memoirs of court ladies and Buddhist hermits, romance, epics, folktales and social satire, with attention to their historical, social, religious and social dimensions, as well as to the individual experience expressed in them. Cross-listed with REL 247.

AAS 248 | CHINESE CALLIGRAPHY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to the art of Chinese calligraphy. Hands-on practice as well as history and theory of the art. This course is open to students with no background in Chinese calligraphy, language, literature, or culture. Cross-listed with MOL 248.

AAS 251 | SOUTH ASIA TO C. 900 C.E.: THE STONE AGE TO THE GOLDEN AGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course follows the development of the history of the region from the earliest phases of human settlement, the first civilization in the Indus valley, and the formation of the Mauryan and Gupta empires. It will analyze the growth of different state structures from tribal/lineage based state to these great empires. It incorporates the rise of regional states and the growing importance of trade to linking South Asia with the West. It will also examine the development of different religious traditions from Vedic Brahmanism to Buddhism to Jainism and the very early days of Islam in the region. The central question of this course will be how to contextualize the relationship between structures like family, law, caste, community, state and the tumultuous changes in the subcontinent over this long period. Cross-listed with HST 151.

AAS 252 | SOUTH ASIA, C. 900 TO 1707: SULTANS, MUGHALS, AND ISLAMIC EMPIRES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course begins with the transformation of society from the 'ancient' to the 'medieval', and compares this to developments in Europe in the feudal age. It then incorporates specific political, social, and cultural developments in South Asia that came about with the establishment of powerful Islamic states in a region where Muslims were a minority. These issues will inform the analysis of the Ghaznavid and Ghurid invasions, the Delhi Sultanate, the Vijayanagara empire and the Mughal empire. The course will end with the Marathas and the decline of the Mughal empire, and the rising influence of the British. The central themes concern how the state, economy, culture, and society developed in the period when Islam became firmly embedded in South Asia. Cross-listed with HST 152.

AAS 253 | ASIAN POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to contemporary government and politics in Asia, focusing on China and Japan, with comparative reference to other Asian and non-Asian political systems. Special attention will be made to the emerging political and economic role of the Pacific Rim. Cross-listed with PSC 253.

AAS 254 | SOUTH ASIA, 1707 - 1947: RISE AND FALL OF THE BRITISH RAJ | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course begins with the decline of the Mughal Empire, and then moves to examine the British empire, the nationalist movement and finally to independence and partition in 1947. The central questions of this course continue to be relevant in the post-colonial period: how we understand the distinctive form of modernity that has developed in South Asia. Taking a comparative approach as often as possible, the course examines the fundamental ways that Britain was as transformed by the development of its empire as was colonial India. The course constantly deconstructs easy binaries of self and others/ East and West by examining the differences within Indian and British society. Cross-listed with HST 153.

AAS 263 | JAPAN TO C. 1200 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Follows the formation of a unified state in central Japan during the 5th and 6th centuries. Considers the influence of Korean immigrants and Chinese philosophy and statecraft on the unification of Japan in early antiquity. Explores rise of Japan's aristocratic court culture in Nara and Kyoto as well as powerful Buddhist institutions and the emergence of the warrior class in Eastern Japan. Cross-listed with HST 263.

AAS 264 | JAPAN, CA. 1200-1800 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Follows the emergence of the warrior class and the system of dual political authority until the 14thcentury, with the imperial court in Kyoto and the samurai elite in Kamakura. Continues with an examination of the early modern processes of urbanization and the growth of a monetary economy, changes in social organization, major cultural innovations, and religious/intellectual movements. Cross-listed with HST 264.

AAS 265 | JAPAN, C. 1800 - PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Follows the radical transformation of Japanese politics, society, and economy with the commercialization of the countryside, the weakening of samurai rule, and increased, often hostile, contact with Western imperialist nations. Explores expansion of Japan as an imperialist nation from the middle of the 19th century and the lasting legacy of that expansion in the region. Explores WWII and postwar political, economic, social changes in contemporary Japan. Cross-listed with HST 265.

AAS 266 | EAST ASIA, C.1800-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Begins with the reshaping of East Asian relations from the late 18th century following the realignment of the region after the expulsion of European Catholic missionaries. Follows the radical shift in the relations between these countries as they all sought to respond to the imperial challenges that the West imposed. Explores the central role of Japan and its effort to build an empire in and beyond East Asia from the late 19th century through its defeat in World War II and the lasting historical legacy of that history in the region. Cross-listed with HST 163.

AAS 272 | ANIME AND MANGA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the development of anime and manga in Japan from their inception to their explosion as international phenomena in recent decades. We consider anime and manga as forms of artistic expression that depend upon and parallel key Japanese visual forms of handscroll painting and woodblock prints. Students learn the ideas, ideals and values in Japanese cinematic and visual expression, and develop skills at analyzing anime and manga as artistic forms. The processes of drawing/creating anime and manga are considered; both form and content of anime and manga are discussed. Cross-listed with HAA 273.

AAS 273 | GLOBAL ASIAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to selected authors, genres, and topics in Asian American or Asian diasporic literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Variable emphasis on different groups, genres, or historical periods. WRD 103 or HON 100 is recommended for this course. Cross-listed with ENG 273.

AAS 290 | TOPICS IN ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course, which varies from quarter to quarter, explores topics in Asian-American studies.

AAS 305 | RELIGION AND CULTURE IN SOUTH ASIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the interplay between religion and society in pre-modern and contemporary South Asia. The course will use such materials as epic texts, poetry, novels, journalism, film, music and art to explore how religion, gender, social class and politics are experienced in the lives of people in India and Pakistan. Cross-listed with REL 305.

AAS 315 | THE STATE & ECONOMIC GROWTH IN EAST ASIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey course focused upon key geographical factors contributing to the emergence of Japan as an international economic leader, and the rapid development of the People's Republic of China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and South Korea, among others, as global economic players. Cross-listed with GEO 315.

AAS 320 | MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Covers modern Japanese literature in English translation from the Meiji era to the present. Themes for study include tradition and modernization, the individual and society, gender, and nostalgia. In addition, beginning with excerpts from Tsubouchi Shoyo's 1886 essay "The Essence of the Novel," students will trace the development of the novel in modern Japan. Cross-listed with MOL 320.

AAS 325 | QUEER JAPAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys representations of same-sex sexuality from the 14th century to the present day in Japan. We will explore the intersection of history, politics, art, and culture through historiography, literature, film, photography, music, cartoons, and animation, examining "traditional" male-male sexuality, the emergence of the modern era of texts reflecting female-female sexuality, as well as the formation of new consciousness and subjectivities throughout the 20th century and into the 21st. Cross-listed with MOL 325.

AAS 337 | ASIAN AMERICAN MEDIA REPRESENTATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the ways in which Americans of Asian descent are portrayed in popular media such as television, film, newspapers, and advertisement.

AAS 338 | ASIAN CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Reviews major Asian philosophical and religious traditions such as Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism and examines how these traditions influence and affect Asian cultures and communication behaviors, particularly communication among Indians, Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Asian Americans in various contexts. Cross-listed with INTC 338.

AAS 341 | ZEN MIND | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of the thought and practice of Zen Buddhism, focusing on the role of Zen in shaping ideas, ethics and the arts in Japan and America. Cross-listed with REL 342.

AAS 342 | ASIAN POLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course offers an overview of the geopolitics, culture and history behind the "East Asian Miracle." It provides students with the tools to analyze the core theories, actors, and current and historical events in the study of the international relations, business, politics, and economy of Asia. Cross-listed with PSC 343.

AAS 343 | JAPANESE AMERICAN HISTORY IN THE US/CHICAGO | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The second course in a sequence of three content-based courses designed for advanced high learners and native speakers of Japanese to discuss authentic cultural, historical, or literary materials. Topics vary with offering: see current schedule for details. Recommended for students who have completed JPN 201-202-203 and JPN 311-312-313, or have equivalent proficiency in Japanese.

AAS 344 | YOGA AND TANTRA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of the history, philosophy and cultural meaning of body-oriented liberative techniques as they developed on the Indian subcontinent and Himalayan region in Hinduism and Buddhism. Students registering for this course are expected to have studied one or both of these traditions in courses such as REL 142, 143, 242, or 243, or in other courses. Background in theory is also useful. Cross-listed with REL 344.

AAS 345 | MORAL PHILOSOPHY, POLITICAL POWER, & RELIGION IN PRE-MODERN CHINA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An exploration of the major traditions informing pre-modern Chinese perspectives on morality, politics, social and personal formation, as well as cosmological and religious anchoring. Topics include Confucianism, Mohism, early Daoism, Legalism, correlative cosmology, liturgical Daoism, Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and also China's traumatic encounter with western power and thought. The course not only addresses comparative issues concerning Chinese values in relation to western views, but also questions common comparative constructs such as those contrasting religion & power; individualism & communalism, and tradition & modernity. Cross-listed with REL 343.

AAS 350 | ETHNIC MINORITY YOUTH: ADAPTATION, IDENTITY AND DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Utilizing an ecological systems perspective, this course examines the challenges and resiliencies faced and acquired by ethnic minority youth. This course will closely examine developmental issues during adolescence that are complicated by being an ethnic minority, or child of immigrant parents. Issues examining the intersection of socio-political power dynamics, with acculturation/cultural adaptation, ethnic identity formation, and intergenerational family conflict will particularly be examined.

AAS 351 | JAPANESE POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the meeting of the ancient and the modern in the context of 21st century politics in Japan. Exploring political, economic, and cultural practices and institutions, this class provides an in-depth understanding of Japan's political system from its origins in samurai traditions to current challenges facing Japan's democracy and economy. Cross-listed with PSC 350.

AAS 352 | CHINESE POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the political system of China and the major domestic issues in contemporary Chinese politics. The course explores the rise and early governance of the Chinese Communist Party, the economic and political developments since the start of the reform (post 1978) era, and the main political challenges facing Chinese society today. Cross-listed with PSC 352.

AAS 363 | YELLOW PERIL/YELLOW POWER: ASIAN AMERICANS IN THE MEDIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This seminar course explores the landscape of popular and visual culture in the U.S. along the axes of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality and cultural "difference."Using an intersectional and interdisciplinary approach, the course also examines Asian Pacific Islander American representation and cultural production. Cross-listed with CMNS 563.

AAS 367 | LITERATURE OF THE VIETNAM WAR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines novels, short stories, and essays on the Vietnam war and its aftermath, Vietnamese society, literature of the Vietnam Era.

AAS 373 | KYOTO (WORLD CITIES) | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Explores the art, architecture, and urban plan of Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan. Kyoto became the seat of government and the home of the imperial court in 794, and it continued to serve as the cultural and religious center of the land until the nineteenth century. This course considers major artistic developments as they relate to main sites in Kyoto, especially palaces, temples, and shrines. The eras covered extend from the Heian to the Meiji period.

AAS 395 | INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GLOBAL ASIAN STUDIES | 4-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Independent study. Variable credit.