Biological Sciences (BIO)

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BIO 104 | EVOLUTION AND SOCIETY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course you will learn to identify questions that can or cannot be answered by science, the assumptions made by science, how evidence is connected to predictions, and evaluate the role of communication and peer-review to promote scientific progress. It also includes current and foundational issues in evolution starting with Darwin's voyage of the Beagle, the Darwinian Natural Selection Theory, and the impact of evolution on disease and society.

BIO 105 | THE SCIENCE BEHIND HUMAN HEALTH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students will study the causes of health problems and how they are treated in order to develop their understanding of the nature and process of science. Students will learn how to recognize common problems with scientific studies and how to distinguish good science from pseudoscience. Genetics and nutrition will be key topics; hormonal disorders and infectious diseases will also be touched upon. By the end of the course, students will be better equipped to assess the quality of health science and other scientific information that they will encounter in the future.

BIO 110 | EVOLUTION IN HEALTH AND MEDICINE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines how scientists are increasingly incorporating evolutionary thinking and research methods in medicine and health sciences. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on how the scientific method works and how scientists go about answering pressing questions related to human health. By the end of the course, students should have a greater appreciation of the value of science and how our place in the natural world relates to the health challenges that we face.

BIO 115 | INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Deals with the scientific method, biological chemistry, structure, function, and heredity of cells and organisms, evolution and ecology. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 115 and BIO 155, No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 118 | MARINE BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Study of marine diversity, marine ecosystems, and connections between oceans and humans. Student cannot receive credit for both BIO 118 and 160, No credit for Biology majors or minors.

LSP 120 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 120 | THE SCIENCE AND ART OF VISION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This Science as a Way of Knowing course will survey how our understanding of visual system function and our perception of the visual arts has developed through scientific inquiry. We will examine hypotheses about the evolution of human vision and the nature of visual anomalies, and will discuss creative efforts to evaluate these hypotheses. We will review questions that remain unresolved, and identify related technical and/or ethical constraints. Basic knowledge of visual processing will be applied to explore how artists employ techniques that interface with the visual system to create specific impressions.

BIO 121 | INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND IMMUNITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of microorganisms, especially those which cause infectious diseases and to explain how the immune system protects the body against these organisms. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 121 and BIO 161, No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 122 | INTRODUCTION TO PALEOBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the concepts and practices of paleobiology, the scientific study of the biology of extinct organisms preserved as fossils. No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 126 | BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines basic concepts in neurobiology. Specifically how the brain is organized, how it sends messages throughout the body, and how these messages turn into daily activities such as seeing, eating, and walking. How these behaviors are altered due to disease or injury of the brain is also discussed. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 126 and BIO 162. Formerly BIO 206. No credit for Biology majors or minors or Neuroscience majors.

BIO 128 | STRESS, HORMONES AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study and discussion of the basic concepts of stress and stressors, and their effects on the functioning of the Nervous System, the Endocrine System and the Immune System; the feedback influence of hormones and neurochemicals on cerebral processing, and the relation of these phenomena to health and behavioral medicine. Formerly BIO 208. No credit for Biology majors or minors or Neuroscience majors.

BIO 134 | HOW THE HUMAN BODY WORKS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Fundamentals of human body functions through an examination of organs and organ systems. The quantitative component of this course will explore the concepts of scientific discovery through structured out-of-class projects. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 202 and BIO 134. Formerly BIO 224. No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 155 | INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This lecture-laboratory course deals with the scientific method, biological chemistry, structure and function of cells, organs, and organ systems, heredity, evolution and ecology. Course includes a laboratory experience involving biological concepts discussed in class. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 115 and BIO 155. No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 156 | FOOD, FUEL FOR LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Food from a biological perspective: defined at the chemical and biochemical level and as it fuels life through metabolism and nutrition. Other topics include improving foods by traditional breeding and new genetic engineering technology, food production, sustainable agriculture; food safety issues, and feeding world populations. No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 160 | MARINE BIOLOGY WITH LAB | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Study of marine diversity; marine ecosystems; and connections between oceans, the atmosphere, and humans. Lecture-Laboratory. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 118 and BIO 160. No credit for Biology majors or minors.

LSP 120 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 161 | INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND IMMUNITY WITH LABORATORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of microorganisms with particular emphasis on how microorganisms cause disease and the actions of the human body in fighting disease. This course includes a laboratory experience to reinforce concepts and introduce students to practical aspects of disease causing microorganisms. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 121 and BIO 161. No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 162 | THE BRAIN: BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Explores basic concepts in neurobiology, including the organization and evolution of the vertebrate system, how the nervous system sends messages through the body and how these messages are translated into the variety of human behaviors. Alterations in behavior due to brain disease or injury is also discussed. The laboratory elaborates on lecture material and provides insight into how scientific reasoning and testing can help to discover how the brain works. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 126 and BIO 162. Formerly BIO 239. No credit for Biology majors or minors or Neuroscience majors.

BIO 166 | INTRODUCTION TO PLANT BIOLOGY WITH LAB | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course deals with the characteristic features of higher plants, plant products that are beneficial to humans, structure, physiology and ecology of cultivated plants, and modern horticultural and genetic approaches to the improvement of plants and plant productivity. No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 183 | NATURAL HISTORY OF THE GALAPAGOS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to present students with the diversity and unique life forms that exist on the Galapagos Islands and the nearby coastal region of Ecuador. The organisms of the Galapagos Islands are isolated from the mainland of South America, resulting in a large number of animal and plant species found only on these islands. This course will cover the ecosystems, geology, and plant/animal adaptations of these islands, and on the way in which these unique adaptations relate to the ecological pressures found on the islands and the surrounding marine environment. Comparisons between mainland and island populations will be discussed to help demonstrate the way in which new ecological pressures on isolated ancestral populations can give rise to evolution.

BIO 191 | GENERAL BIOLOGY I FOR SCIENCE MAJORS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Focuses on the unity of life: its biochemical and cellular makeup and functions, the acquisition and utilization of energy, and the storage and utilization of genetic information. Lecture-laboratory. CHE 130 and CHE 131 are recommended as corequisites.

MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 192 | GENERAL BIOLOGY II FOR SCIENCE MAJORS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to evolution, ecology, organismal development and diversity. Lecture-laboratory.

A grade of C- or higher in BIO 191 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 193 | GENERAL BIOLOGY III FOR SCIENCE MAJORS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Deals primarily with diversity and development within the plant and animal kingdoms including basic principles of physiology. Lecture-laboratory.

A grade of C- or higher in BIO 192 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 201 | HUMAN ANATOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Structure of the human body with an emphasis on gross anatomy. Lecture-laboratory. Lecture covers human anatomy; laboratory emphasis on feline dissection.

At least Sophomore Standing is a prerequisite for this course.

BIO 202 | HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to concepts and mechanisms of human organ system function including respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and digestive systems. Lecture-laboratory. Primarily for Health Science majors. No credit for Biology majors or minors. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 202 and BIO 134.

At least Sophomore Standing is a prerequisite for this course.

BIO 206 | BIOSTATISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of a variety of statistical methods used to analyze biological data.

BIO 193 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 209 | PLANT BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of plant evolution, diversity, reproduction, developmental plant anatomy, regulation of plant growth and development, and plant physiology.

BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 210 | MICROBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Biology of microorganisms with emphasis on viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Lecture-laboratory.

A grade of C- or better in BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 215 | ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides a broad survey of ecological principles and methods of lab and field investigation, using ecological theory to explain patterns observed in nature. Topics link interactions between organisms and their environment to their consequences in populations, communities, and ecosystems, including: the distribution and abundance of organisms in nature; factors that influence population size, growth and regulation; species interactions; community organization and diversity; and ecosystem level processes focused on moving energy and matter among living and nonliving parts of the environment. Labs involve applying ecological methods and sampling techniques to better understand ecological concepts and to gain an increased awareness of the organization and complexity in the natural world. Labs emphasize hypothesis testing and experimental design, the analysis of ecological data, and communicating research findings.

BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 220 | PRINCIPLES OF BIOTECHNOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will address aspects of the research and methodologies used in Modern Biotechnology, and place the field in the context of current societal and ethical concerns. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 210 or BIO 250 or consent of instructor is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 230 | EPIDEMIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will involve the study of the frequency and distribution of human disease. Students will learn how the health of a population is measured, and how medical interventions are quantitatively evaluated. Students will analyze data from historical and modern health studies, including population surveys, case-control studies, cohort studies, and clinical trials for prevention and treatment.

BIO 206 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 235 | EVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This lecture/laboratory course will examine basic selection, population genetics, development, speciation, extinction, systematics, and the history of evolution. In the lab, students will learn some of the modern research methods used in the study of evolution.

BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 250 | CELL BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Fundamentals of cell form and function studied at the molecular and organelle level, including basic cellular biochemistry, ultrastructure and physiology. Lecture-laboratory.

A grade of C- or better in BIO 193 and a grade of C- or better in CHE 134 (or CHE 138 or CHE 144) are prerequisites for this class.

BIO 260 | GENETICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Transmission of heritable traits, nature of genetic material, manner of its expression, its mutability, and its significance with respect to organismal and species variation. Lecture-laboratory.

A grade of C- or better in BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 270 | COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This lecture-laboratory course explores the diversity, anatomy, and evolution of vertebrates. The laboratory portion includes dissection and observation of various vertebrates.

BIO 192 and BIO 193 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 290 | TOPICS IN BIOLOGY | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Occasional courses offered at intermediate levels. See the schedule of classes for current offerings. 2 or 4 quarter hours.

Sophomore standing is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 301 | ANIMAL BEHAVIOR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An exploration of the types of animal behavior and modifiers of behavior as based on neuroendocrine function, with special emphasis on Felids. Lecture - Field Studies. Laboratory required.

BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193, BIO 206 and (BIO 215 or BIO 235) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 302 | STUDENT LABORATORY INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Student Laboratory Instruction. Completion of course requires student to serve as teaching assistant for biology laboratory course in the following quarter.

BIO 303 | INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to Scientific Research. Course requires that student has had (or currently having) experience in scientific research.

BIO 304 | FIELD METHODS FOR BIOLOGISTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will focus on the methods needed to initiate and undertake observations on Midwest ecosystems. Students will learn methods and put into practice the tools required to begin a site inventory and to assess population characteristics. The data gathered by the class will be archived and used as a starting point for subsequent studies. Each student will have an original research project involving extensive field work in nature.

Junior Standing or above is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 306 | RESEARCH METHODS & APPLIED BIOSTATISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Approaches to conducting research and a variety of statistical approaches will be discussed and used to answer questions applied to biological data. A computer lab will introduce and use the statistical software program R for graphing and statistically analyzing biological data sets. Includes such topics as: study design, data management, presenting data, analysis of variance (one-way and multi-factor), analysis of covariance, multiple regression, logistic regression, and AIC model selection.

BIO 206 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 307 | ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Physiology is a branch of biology dealing with the functions of living organisms; it addresses questions that relate to how living organisms work. This lecture-laboratory course focuses on the physiology of a broad range of animals including both vertebrates and invertebrates. The primary objectives of the course are (1) to define many of the physiological challenges experienced by animals living in different environments (respiratory gas exchange, temperature regulation, ion and water balance, etc.) and (2) to study the strategies and physiological mechanisms involved in dealing with these challenges. Although this course will take a broad approach examining many interesting physiological adaptations, students will learn to appreciate that there are far more similarities between how different animals do things than there are differences. (Cannot receive credit for both BIO 307 and BIO 308. Cannot receive credit for BIO 307 if credit already earned for BIO 310.)

A grade of C- or better in BIO 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 308 | HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Physiology is a branch of biology dealing with the functions of living organisms; it addresses questions that relate to how living organisms work. This lecture-laboratory course focuses on human physiology at the organ system level. The human approach has immediate personal relevance; most of us are interested in how the human body solves the basic problems associated with life. The primary objectives of the course are (1) to define many of the physiological problems experienced by the human body (respiratory gas exchange, body nutrition, temperature regulation, body fluid regulation, etc.), (2) to study the concepts and mechanisms involved in solving these problems, and (3) to evaluate the effects of various disease states (e.g., emphysema, hypertension, renal failure, fever, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes) on normal body function. Although this course focuses on the human organism, the concepts and mechanisms to be addressed are applicable to a broad range of other vertebrates. (Cannot receive credit for both BIO 307 and BIO 308. Cannot earn credit for BIO 308 if received credit for BIO 310.)

A grade of C- or better in BIO 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 309 | PLANT PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to take a detailed look at how vascular plants function. Specifically to understand what biochemical life sustaining processes are occurring in the plant, what a plant needs from the environment, and how a plant reacts to and influences its environment. The general topics that will be covered in this course include: 1) The properties of water and its function in plants; 2) Substances moved in plants and the pathways involved in this movement; 3) Mineral uptake and roles of essential elements; 4) Intermediary metabolism and metabolic regulation as they pertain to plants; and 5) Control of plant growth and development. The laboratory portion of this course will be used to reinforce and expand upon the topics covered in lecture.

BIO 250 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 310 | VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Functions and regulatory mechanisms of vertebrate cells, organs and organ systems with special emphasis on mammals. Lecture-Laboratory.

BIO 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 311 | HISTOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A Lecture/Laboratory course covering the microscopic structure of the tissues that make up animal organs. The development of these tissues as well as their relationship to the principles of gross anatomy, physiology, cell biology and molecular biology is stressed.

BIO 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 312 | TOPICS IN EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an introduction to exercise physiology to enable exploration of current research topics in the field. Weekly discussion and presentation of articles from peer-reviewed journals will reinforce and elaborate on concepts covered in lecture. Topics include: muscle structure and bioenergetics, cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise, human evolution and endurance, training and adaptation, nutrition and ergogenic aids, and the relationships between exercise, health, and longevity.

BIO 250 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 315 | TOPICS IN ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The focus of this course is to read and critique classic papers in ecology and to connect their foundational ideas with modern research and understanding.

BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and BIO 215 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 316 | PHYCOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to algae with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, ultrastructure, physiology, life histories of freshwater and marine species. Lecture-laboratory. Cross-listed as BIO 416.

BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 317 | AQUATIC BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The study of biological, physical and chemical phenomena in freshwater environments. Emphasis on organisms and their ecology. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and BIO 215 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 318 | FIELD STUDIES IN MARINE AND ESTUARINE BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed for science majors with an interest in marine and estuarine biology and will examine this subject from an ecological perspective. The primary objectives of the course are: 1) to explore the diversity of marine and estuarine life; 2) to understand the manner in which physical and biological factors influence biological diversity in marine systems; 3) to understand the role that humans play in shaping these dynamics; and 4) to develop professional connections and gain real-life experiences in marine science.

BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and (BIO 215 or BIO 235) or instructor consent are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 319 | TOPICS IN BEHAVIORAL PARASITOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed for science majors and graduate students with an interest in animal behavior, ecology, evolution, health science, veterinary science and parasitology. The course adopts an integrative approach to the study of Behavioral Parasitology, which draws on modern developments in the fields of Animal Behavior, Parasitology, Ecology and Evolution. The primary objectives of the course are to: 1) explore the diverse relationships that occurs between parasite infection and host behavior; 2) understand proximate mechanisms that underlie behavioral manipulation by parasites; 3) explore the ecological and evolutionary impacts of behavioral manipulation in nature; 4) extend findings from animal systems to human-related issues (health, psychology); 5) develop familiarity with reading and interpreting primary literature. The teaching approach will be primarily discussion- and presentation-based and will be highly-interactive in nature.

(BIO 191 and BIO 192 and BIO 193) and (BIO 215 or BIO 235) are prerequisites for this class; or consent of instructor.

BIO 320 | ADVANCED MICROBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Advanced microbiology lecture-lab course designed for science majors and graduate students that will focus on developing technical and critical thinking skills in the field of microbiology. Labs will involve independent or small group research projects.

BIO 210 and Junior standing (or consent of instructor) are prerequisites for this class.

BIO 321 | MOLECULAR METHODS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide hands-on experience in methods of detecting and analyzing molecular variation in nature. By the end of the course, students should be competent employing molecular markers to answer a wide variety of basic questions in ecology and evolution.

BIO 215 or BIO 235 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 325 | PALEOBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This lecture/laboratory course will introduce students to various principles of paleobiology and to provide a broad survey of important taxonomic groups. This course will cover topics such as: the concept of geologic time, evolution, extinction, morphology, taxonomic classification, fossilization, paleoecology, biogeography, and biostratigraphy. The laboratory portion of the course will reinforce the lecture topics and offer an opportunity to examine fossil specimens and compare them with modern forms.

BIO 192, BIO 193 and (BIO 215 or BIO 335) or instructor's consent are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 330 | DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of developmental phenomena in animals from fertilization to sexual maturity. Students will gain a current understanding of the genetic, cellular, and environmental mechanisms that shape the body and its major organs.

BIO 250 and BIO 260 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 331 | TOPICS IN DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This seminar course examines the current embryological literature using both evolutionary and molecular perspectives. Previous student-led topics include: how early embryos are organized, the signals controlling left-right asymmetry, the evolutionary origin of feathers and the development of the retina.

BIO 330 or 360 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 332 | POPULATION ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course covers concepts and models in population ecology and their applications for predicting population trends and disease spread across populations, understanding conservation biology approaches, and the sustainable management of wildlife populations.

ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 333 | MYCOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate their knowledge of cell biology, genetics, ecology and physiology at the organismal level by focusing on fungi. Students will gain an appreciation of the biological diversity within the major groups of fungi and their role in the environment, research and biotechnology. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 215, BIO 250, and BIO 260 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 335 | CONCEPTS IN EVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Study of evolution and diversity in the living world. Lecture only.

BIO 235 or (BIO 215 and BIO 260) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 339 | CELLULAR NEUROBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuronal function and the changes that occur in processes such as learning and memory. Emphasis on electrophysiology, synaptic communication, and cellular signaling. Cross-listed as BIO439, NEU339, NEU439.

BIO 250 (or PSY 377 or HLTH 301) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 340 | BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Explores the organization of the nervous system on a gross anatomical level and based on functional units. The emphasis is on understanding how individual behaviors are produced by different neural systems and how these individual behaviors integrate into the activities of whole organisms. Formerly Systems Neurobiology. Cross-listed as BIO 440.

NEU 201 (or BIO 339 or BIO 310 or HLTH 301 or PSY 377) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 341 | TOPICS IN NEUROBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A seminar course examining current topics in neurobiology. Original readings will include both current review and classic neuroscience articles.

BIO 340 (or BIO 339 or NEU 339 or BIO 342 or PSY 377) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 342 | COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the neuroscience of human behaviors such as emotions, attention, executive function, language, learning, memory, and social interaction by exploring both the underlying biological mechanisms and the psychological theories behind these behaviors. Cognitive Neuroscience is an emerging field of study that attempts to help one gain an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the human mind.

NEU 201 (or BIO 339 or BIO 340 or BIO 341 or PSY 377) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 345 | TOPICS IN PALEOBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A seminar course examining various topics in paleobiology (the study of ancient life) including morphological concepts, macroevolutionary processes, extinction events, phylogenetic systematics, paleoecology, paleoebiogeography, and the adequacy of the fossil record. Readings include classic and recent articles in the fields of paleobiology.

BIO 192, BIO 193 and (BIO 215 or BIO 235) or instructor's consent are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 347 | TOPICS IN MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will address current topics of concern and research in medical bacteriology. Students participating in this course will explore key concepts used in bacterial pathogenesis and learn how to critically appraise recent research papers in the field.

(BIO 210 or BIO 250) and Junior/Senior Biology standing (or consent of instructor) are prerequisites for this class.

BIO 348 | THE BIOLOGY OF INFECTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide students with detailed knowledge of medically important bacteria. The course will first examine common events in infections and the body's responses to infection. We will highlight in these studies the changes in both hosts and pathogens as strategies of infection and immunity evolve relative to one another. Within this framework we will examine a spectrum of infectious diseases in detail.

BIO 210 and BIO 370 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 349 | TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will address current topics of concern and research in microbiology and biotechnology. Students participating in this course will explore fundamental concepts being used and new discoveries and emerging technologies in microbiology and biotechnology. Students will learn how to critically appraise recent research papers in these fields.

BIO 210 or BIO 220 or consent of instructor is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 350 | ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to the ecological concept of adaptation. Adaptation is defined and illustrated using specific animal examples. Discussion will focus on how these specializations in structure and function equip the animal for survival.

Status as a Biology major with Junior or Senior standing or consent of the instructor is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 352 | ADVANCED COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Comparative and environmental approach to the functions and mechanisms of vertebrate organ systems. Selected topics will be addressed using a lecture/discussion/seminar format. Cross-listed as BIO 452.

BIO 310 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 354 | PROBLEMS IN CELL MOTILITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analysis of contemporary problems in cellular movements, with emphasis on the biochemistry, biophysics and regulation of cell and organelle movements. Lecture, seminar, discussion.

BIO 250, (PHY 152 or PHY 172 or PHY 156) and (MAT 149 or MAT 152 or MAT 162 or MAT 172) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 355 | GENETIC TOXICOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will deal with the study of agents that damage the genome or alter the proper functioning of the genome that can lead to disease in humans. Topics covered will include basic spectrum of genetic damage and chromosomal effects, mechanisms of mutations, DNA repair, genetic assays used for evaluation of genetic toxicology, health consequences of genetic damage, including cancer and inheritable mutations, and the current position of US government and global regulatory agencies on the issues of genetic toxicology.

BIO 260 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 360 | MOLECULAR BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Study of biology at the molecular level, focusing on the regulation of gene expression and the principles of genetic engineering. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 250 and BIO 260 are prerequisites for this class.

BIO 361 | TOPICS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Discussion and seminars in selected areas of molecular biology. Cross-listed as CHE 461.

BIO 360 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 362 | BIOINFORMATICS FOR BENCH SCIENTISTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Study how high-throughput technologies like whole-genome sequencing have changed biological research, and learn to use computers in real research tasks such as primer design, DNA sequencing, homology searches, sequence alignment, and more. Cross-listed with BIO 462.

BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and BIO 260 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 365 | PRINCIPLES OF TOXICOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms, including the chemical natures, kinetics, dose-response relationships, metabolism, and mechanisms of action of various toxins and toxicants.

BIO 193 and (CHE 234 or CHE 238) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 370 | IMMUNOBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Basic factors governing immune phenomena and antigen-antibody reactions. Lecture-laboratory. Cross-listed as BIO 471.

BIO 250 or BIO 260 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 375 | INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to Pharmacology will explore the relationships between an organism and its response to an administered drug. This will include: 1) How drugs are administered to the body 2) What is their fate once in the body, i.e. Pharmacokinetics 3) What their mechanisms actions are - i.e. Pharmacodynamics, and 4) Adverse reactions to drugs. We will explore these relationships in different physiological systems of the human body including (but not limited to) the nervous system, circulatory system, digestive system and endocrine system. Lastly, this course will provide an understanding of the pharmaceutical system by providing a framework to explore how drugs are discovered, produced, tested, and regulated.

BIO 250 and 310 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 380 | CANCER BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore the cellular and molecular aspects of cancer. Topics will include the pathology and epidemiology of cancer, the origin and spread of cancer, hereditary and familial cancers, cancer associated genes and strategies of cancer therapy.

BIO 250 and BIO 260 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 381 | TOPICS IN CANCER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a seminar based course that discusses current topics in the field of cancer biology from a cellular and molecular perspective. This course demonstrates the recent advances made in the most common cancers in the western world, toward etiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention. Scientific articles taken from peer-reviewed scientific journals will illustrate available and potential chemotherapeutic approaches towards achieving a treatment for the most common cancers.

BIO 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 385 | MAMMALIAN REPRODUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Molecular, cellular, physiological, and behavioral aspects of mammalian reproduction. Mechanisms and strategies used by mammals in reproductive processes including sexual differentiation, gamete production, puberty, reproductive hormone cyclicity, neuroendocrine control mechanisms, pregnancy, parturition, and reproductive behavior. Cross-listed with BIO 485.

BIO 250 and BIO 310 or instructor consent are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 386 | INTRODUCTION TO ENDOCRINOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of hormones as chemical regulators of development, growth, metabolism, homeostasis, reproduction, response to stress, and behavior; as well as hormone synthesis, chemistry, mechanisms of action, and endocrine gland structure.

BIO 250 and (BIO 310 or [HLTH 301 & HLTH 302]) are prerequisites for this course.

BIO 389 | RESEARCH IN FIELD BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

BIO 389/489 is a research-intensive course designed for science majors and graduate students that will focus on developing skills of collaborative field-based research. Throughout the course, students (working in groups of 2 or 3) will utilize the scientific method to develop and carry out an original research project. Students will utilize the primary literature to learn the current state of research in an area that interests them, then use that knowledge to develop a novel question they can test with a field-based experiment. Data collected will be analyzed and results compiled into a publication quality paper. Students will then present their study to their peers in the form of an oral or poster presentation.

Study Abroad Course

BIO 390 | SPECIAL TOPICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Occasional courses offered at an advanced level. See the schedule of classes for current offerings. Cross-listed as BIO 490.

Junior or Senior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 392 | EXTRAMURAL INTERNSHIP | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic experience with real-world work situations; supervision is provided by a member of the DePaul Faculty in the Biological Sciences and the private or public enterprise. 0-4 credit hours.

At least Sophomore standing and a declared Biological Sciences major, or by arrangement with the Biology internship director or department permission are prerequisites for this class.

BIO 395 | BIOLOGY CAPSTONE SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The aim of this course is to integrate current biological view(s) of humanity with the perspectives of the liberal studies curriculum. Students will develop and debate topics that demonstrate mastery of the biology core curriculum (cell biology, genetics, physiology and ecology) while touching on history, philosophy, ethics and the law.

BIO 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4.5 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

independent Study. 1-4 quarter hours.

BIO 400 | DEVELOPMENT OF TOPICS FOR RESEARCH | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The purpose of this course is to help graduate students in formulating research questions and design methods while improving written expression and oral presentation skills. Students will, with the guidance of a faculty member, undertake a detailed investigation of a topic, formulate a potential research project in that area, and present their proposal orally to the faculty at the end of the quarter.

BIO 401 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 2-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Experimental and/or Library study of selected topics in the life sciences. A-Cell Biology, B-Immunobiology, C-Developmental Biology, D-Physiology, E-Endocrinology, F-Genetics, G-Structural Biology, H-Ecology, I-Molecular Biology, J-Neurobiology. Offered in the Autumn, Winter, Spring and Summer quarters. 2 or 4 quarter hours.

BIO 402 | INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDIES | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Presents the biology faculty and facilities. Various research and teaching methods in biology will be explored. Required of all graduate students. Formerly BIO 495.

Status as a graduate Biology student (MA or MS) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 403 | DEVELOPMENT OF TOPICS FOR RESEARCH | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The purpose of this course is to help graduate students in formulating research questions and design methods while improving written expression and oral presentation skills. Students will, with the guidance of a faculty member, undertake a detailed investigation of a topic, formulate a potential research project in that area, and present their proposal orally to the faculty at the end of the quarter. Formerly BIO 400.

Status as a graduate Biology student (MA or MS) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 406 | RESEARCH METHODS & APPLIED BIOSTATISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Approaches to conducting research and a variety of statistical approaches will be discussed and used to answer questions applied to biological data. A computer lab will introduce and use the statistical software program R for graphing and statistically analyzing biological data sets. Includes such topics as: study design, data management, presenting data, analysis of variance (one-way and multi-factor), analysis of covariance, multiple regression, logistic regression, and AIC model selection.

Status as a graduate Biology student (MA or MS) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 409 | PLANT PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A study of the functional and developmental aspects of flowering plants. Lecture-laboratory. Cross-listed as BIO 309.

BIO 412 | TOPICS IN EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides an introduction to exercise physiology to enable exploration of current research topics in the field. Weekly discussion and presentation of articles from peer-reviewed journals will reinforce and elaborate on concepts covered in lecture. Topics include: muscle structure and bioenergetics, cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise, human evolution and endurance, training and adaptation, nutrition and ergogenic aids, and the relationships between exercise, health, and longevity.

BIO 415 | TOPICS IN ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The focus of this course is to read and critique classic papers in ecology and to connect their foundational ideas with modern research and understanding.

BIO 416 | PHYCOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Introduction to algae with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, ultrastructure, physiology, life histories of freshwater and marine species. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 417 | AQUATIC BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The study of biological, physical and chemical phenomena in fresh water and marine environments. Emphasis on organisms and their interactions. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 419 | TOPICS IN BEHAVIORAL PARASITOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed for science majors and graduate students with an interest in animal behavior, ecology, evolution, health science, veterinary science and parasitology. The course adopts an integrative approach to the study of Behavioral Parasitology, which draws on modern developments in the fields of Animal Behavior, Parasitology, Ecology and Evolution. The primary objectives of the course are to: 1) explore the diverse relationships that occurs between parasite infection and host behavior; 2) understand proximate mechanisms that underlie behavioral manipulation by parasites; 3) explore the ecological and evolutionary impacts of behavioral manipulation in nature; 4) extend findings from animal systems to human-related issues (health, psychology); 5) develop familiarity with reading and interpreting primary literature. The teaching approach will be primarily discussion- and presentation-based and will be highly-interactive in nature.

BIO 420 | ADVANCED MICROBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Advanced microbiology lecture-lab course designed for science majors and graduate students that will focus on developing technical and critical thinking skills in the field of microbiology. Labs will involve independent or small group research projects.

BIO 421 | MOLECULAR METHODS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will provide hands-on experience in methods of detecting and analyzing molecular variation in nature. By the end of the course, students should be competent employing molecular markers to answer a wide variety of basic questions in ecology and evolution. Cross-listed with BIO 321.

BIO 425 | CELLULAR EVENTS IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Analysis of cellular and subcellular interactions in the immune response. Lecture, seminar, discussion. BIO 470 recommended.

BIO 430 | DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A survey of developmental phenomena in animals from fertilization to sexual maturity. Topics include gametogenesis, early cell divisions, organ formation, metamorphosis, regeneration, birth defects, stem cells, reproductive technology and mammalian cloning. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 431 | TOPICS IN DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar course examines the current embryological literature using both evolutionary and molecular perspectives. Previous student-led topics include: how early embryos are organized, the signals controlling left-right asymmetry, the evolutionary origin of feathers and the development of the retina. BIO 430 or BIO 460 recommended.

BIO 432 | POPULATION ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course covers concepts and models in population ecology and their applications for predicting population trends and disease spread across populations, understanding conservation biology approaches, and the sustainable management of wildlife populations.

ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 433 | MYCOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate their knowledge of cell biology, genetics, ecology and physiology at the organismal level by focusing on fungi. Students will gain an appreciation of the biological diversity within the major groups of fungi and their role in the environment, research and biotechnology. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 435 | CONCEPTS IN EVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Study of evolution and diversity in the living world. Lecture only.

BIO 439 | CELLULAR NEUROBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuronal function and the changes that occur in processes such as learning and memory. Emphasis on electrophysiology, synaptic communication, and cellular signaling. Cross-listed as BIO439, NEU339, NEU439.

BIO 440 | BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

An examination of the ways in which neural systems underpin behavior with an emphasis on vertebrates. In this course, behavior is understood in its broadest sense, from the functioning of organs and organ systems to the activities of whole organisms. Formerly Systems Neurobiology. Lecture-Laboratory.

BIO 441 | TOPICS IN NEUROBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A seminar course examining current topics in neurobiology. Original readings will include both current review and classic articles in the fields of neurobiology, neuroethology and the related neurosciences. BIO 439 or BIO 440 is recommended.

BIO 442 | COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores the neuroscience of human behaviors such as emotions, attention, executive function, language, learning, memory, and social interaction by exploring both the underlying biological mechanisms and the psychological theories behind these behaviors. Cognitive Neuroscience is an emerging field of study that attempts to help one gain an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the human mind.

BIO 445 | TOPICS IN PALEOBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A seminar course examining various topics in paleobiology (the study of ancient life) including morphological concepts, macroevolutionary processes, extinction events, phylogenetic systematics, paleoecology, paleobiogeography, and the adequacy of the fossil record. Readings include classic and recent articles in the fields of paleobiology.

BIO 447 | TOPICS IN MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will address current topics of concern and research in medical bacteriology. Students participating in this course will explore key concepts used in bacterial pathogenesis and learn how to critically appraise recent research papers in the field.

BIO 448 | THE BIOLOGY OF INFECTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will provide students with detailed knowledge of medically important bacteria. The course will first examine common events in infections and the body's responses to infection. We will highlight in these studies the changes in both hosts and pathogens as strategies of infection and immunity evolve relative to one another. Within this framework we will examine a spectrum of infectious diseases in detail. BIO 470 is recommended.

BIO 449 | TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will address current topics of concern and research in microbiology and biotechnology. Students participating in this course will explore fundamental concepts being used and new discoveries and emerging technologies in microbiology and biotechnology. Students will learn how to critically appraise recent research papers in these fields.

BIO 450 | PROBLEMS IN CELL MOTILITY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Analysis of contemporary problems in cellular movements, with emphasis on the biochemistry, biophysics and regulation of cell and organelle movements. Lecture, seminar, discussion.

BIO 452 | ADVANCED COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Comparative and environmental approach to the function and mechanisms of vertebrate organ systems. Selected topics in comparative physiology will be addressed using a lecture/discussion/seminar format.

BIO 455 | GENETIC TOXICOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will deal with the study of agents that damage the genome or alter the proper functioning of the genome that can lead to disease in humans. Topics covered will include basic spectrum of genetic damage and chromosomal effects, mechanisms of mutations, DNA repair, genetic assays used for evaluation of genetic toxicology, health consequences of genetic damage, including cancer and inheritable mutations, and the current position of US government and global regulatory agencies on the issues of genetic toxicology.

BIO 260 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 460 | MOLECULAR BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Study of biology at the molecular level, focusing on the regulation of gene expression and the principles of genetic engineering. Lecture-laboratory. Cross-listed as BIO 360.

BIO 461 | TOPICS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Discussion and seminars in selected areas of molecular biology.

BIO 462 | BIOINFORMATICS FOR BENCH SCIENTISTS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Study how high-throughput technologies like whole-genome sequencing have changed biological research, and learn to use computers in real research tasks such as primer design, DNA sequencing, homology searches, sequence alignment, and more. Cross-listed with BIO 362.

BIO 465 | PRINCIPLES OF TOXICOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A study of the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms, including the chemical natures, kinetics, dose-response relationships, metabolism, and mechanisms of action of various toxins and toxicants.

BIO 471 | IMMUNOBIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Basic factors governing immune phenomena and antigen antibody reactions. Lecture-laboratory.

BIO 475 | INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Introduction to Pharmacology will explore the relationships between an organism and its response to an administered drug. This will include: 1) How drugs are administered to the body 2) What is their fate once in the body, i.e. Pharmacokinetics 3) What their mechanisms actions are - i.e. Pharmacodynamics, and 4) Adverse reactions to drugs. We will explore these relationships in different physiological systems of the human body including (but not limited to) the nervous system, circulatory system, digestive system and endocrine system. Lastly, this course will provide an understanding of the pharmaceutical system by providing a framework to explore how drugs are discovered, produced, tested, and regulated. Cross-listed with BIO 375.

BIO 480 | CANCER BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will explore the cellular and molecular aspects of cancer. Topics will include the pathology and epidemiology of cancer, the origin and spread of cancer, hereditary and familial cancers, cancer associated genes and strategies of cancer therapy.

BIO 481 | TOPICS IN CANCER | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a seminar based course that discusses current topics in the field of cancer biology from a cellular and molecular perspective. This course demonstrates the recent advances made in the most common cancers in the western world, toward etiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention. Scientific articles taken from peer-reviewed scientific journals will illustrate available and potential chemotherapeutic approaches towards achieving a treatment for the most common cancers.

BIO 485 | MAMMALIAN REPRODUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Molecular, cellular, physiological, and behavioral aspects of mammalian reproduction. Mechanisms and strategies used by mammals in reproductive processes including sexual differentiation, gamete production, puberty, reproductive hormone cyclicity, neuroendocrine control mechanisms, pregnancy, parturition, and reproductive behavior. Cross-listed with BIO 385.

BIO 486 | INTRODUCTION TO ENDOCRINOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A study of hormones as chemical regulators of development, growth, metabolism, homeostasis, reproduction, response to stress, and behavior; as well as hormone synthesis, chemistry, mechanisms of action, and endocrine gland structure.

BIO 488 | ADVANCED ENDOCRINOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Analysis of non-hypothalamic-hypophyseal pathways for hormonal regulation of the structure, function and biochemistry of hard tissues, calcium metabolism, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Lecture-seminar. BIO 486 is recommended.

BIO 489 | RESEARCH IN FIELD BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

BIO 389/489 is a research-intensive course designed for science majors and graduate students that will focus on developing skills of collaborative field-based research. Throughout the course, students (working in groups of 2 or 3) will utilize the scientific method to develop and carry out an original research project. Students will utilize the primary literature to learn the current state of research in an area that interests them, then use that knowledge to develop a novel question they can test with a field-based experiment. Data collected will be analyzed and results compiled into a publication quality paper. Students will then present their study to their peers in the form of an oral or poster presentation.

BIO 490 | SPECIAL TOPICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Occasional courses offered at the graduate level. See schedule for current offerings.

BIO 491 | MASTER OF ARTS SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A seminar course dealing with current readings in the biological sciences. Students will evaluate and interpret these readings both orally and in writing.

BIO 494 | COMMUNICATING SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students will refine their oral and written presentation skills using their own research as the subject. The components of an effective research talk, poster presentation, and formal thesis will be examined. Students will have several opportunities to present their research and to receive and participate in peer review. This course is required for second year Biology MS students.

Status as a graduate Biology student (MA or MS) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 495 | INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDY | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Presents the biology faculty and facilities. Various research and teaching methods in biology will be explored. Required of all graduate students.

BIO 496 | RESEARCH | 2-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Experimental work in selected areas of biology. These studies do not necessarily relate to a thesis. Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer. Laboratory. Two or four quarter hours.

BIO 498 | RESEARCH FOR MASTER'S THESIS | 2-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Original study of a specific biological problem leading to a thesis.

BIO 499 | THESIS RESEARCH | 2-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Original study of a specific biological problem leading to a thesis. Formerly BIO 496, BIO 498.

BIO 502 | CANDIDACY CONTINUATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students who have completed their coursework and are actively working on the requirements for the Master's thesis (MS), or final project (MA), must enroll in candidacy continuation each quarter of the academic year until the Master's requirement has been completed. This course carries the equivalent of half-time enrollment status. Course requires graduate program director approval and proof of work each quarter. Pass/No Pass grading. (0 credit hours)

BIO 503 | CANDIDACY MAINTENANCE | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is meant for Master's students not actively working on their thesis. It is only used to maintain active student status. It will not give the student full- or half-time enrollment status and will not permit deferment of student loans. Course requires graduate program director approval each quarter. (0 credit hours)