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FA 109 | TAX PLANNING FOR A SECURE RETIREMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) administers tax laws which affect retirement income. What investment options are sheltered against taxes? What are some of the growth funds that have historically kept pace with economic growth in spite of taxes? These are some of the questions which will be addressed in this course. Students will learn to describe, differentiate, and explain form, function, and variation within functional business processes. More specifically, this course examines: 1. Social security, medicare, defined benefit plans and defined contribution plans. 2. Quantitative methods to determine the amount of retirement money you may need in the future. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 110 | ESSENTIALS OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a 5-week, 1-competence course on Employee Training and Development. Students will learn the basic processes of employee training and development, including needs assessment, theories of learning and behavior change, training design to support appropriate selection or development of training, delivery of training, issues of transfer, and assessment of results. (2 quarter hours)

FA 112 | EXPLORING SUCCESS TECHNIQUES FOR ENHANCING CAREER SKILLS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will address challenges that individuals encounter as they seek to advance in the job market as well as the problems faced within the workplace. The purpose of the course is to refresh and increase your effectiveness and preparation as a job seeker in your chosen field. The course will cover areas such as resume and cover letter writing, interviewing techniques, and effective job searches. Meets first five weeks of the quarter. May only be taken for one competence.

FA 113 | MANAGING CHANGE FOR ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

If change were simple, all organizations would be effective and thrive in the presence of great challenges. Implementing change involves complex skills combining visionary leadership with project and other management skills. This 5-week class provides an introduction into the management and leadership skills change agents use on a regular basis as they implement organizational change. The focus of the class will be departmental or division change to in the workplace and will provide skill development of both managerial and interpersonal skill elements crucial to the success of change implementations. (2 credit hours)

FA 117 | WORK IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Globalization of the world's economy has dramatically changed the interactions of people from different cultures. As a result, the importance of understanding cultural difference has increased significantly. This seminar will introduce students to the challenges and opportunities associated with living, working and learning in a global environment. This will be done through discussion, reading, case studies, films and exercises to increase cultural self awareness as well as cross-cultural sensitivity. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 120 | ESSENTIALS OF COACHING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Effective coaching has long been recognized as a key element of success in the world of sports. More recently, a new breed of coaches has emerged to help people transform their personal and professional lives. In this course, we will explore the theories, concepts, and techniques of personal life and business coaching. Students will learn about the history of coaching, its uses in personal and professional development and practical applications. Working individually, in pairs, and in small groups, students will practice coaching skills and keep a detailed learning journal. This course will be highly experiential and collaborative in nature. Students will learn concepts of coaching for personal development and professional effectiveness. In addition, students will learn models of collaborative learning and will apply one recognized model in the exploration of their coaching practice in the course.(2 credit hours)

FA 196 | MANAGING A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The intent of business planning is to set the foundation for business success. More than one business has been put out of business when it experienced unplanned rapid growth. Students learn the financial and management aspects of business along with techniques for defining financial tracking methodologies that uncover and deal with potential problems at an early stage. Special emphasis is placed on merger and acquisition as a forward-looking method for creating new business opportunities and success. Students will work in groups to understand the detailed realities associated with being on the seller and buyer side of a business sale/purchase. Methods of post sale business integration are also discussed. It is strongly recommended but not required that students take "Starting a Successful Business" before taking this class. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 198 | FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR RETIREMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course concentrates on the financial issues of retirement: income, savings, pensions, annuities, portfolios, health care, and taxes. We look carefully at the range of decisions facing adults in the U.S. as they plan for their post-working years. Learning focuses on best models of collaborating with financial experts, and planning for balance in life expectancy and assets (including real estate). The culmination of our course lies in the question of whether to remain employed for life; to resist retirement. We examine that possibility in the light of current labor market practices and the potential benefits of elder entrepreneurship. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 199 | CAREER ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students use structured analysis and reflection, research and planning to create a professional development portfolio. Students learn strategies for reflecting, assessing strengths and growth opportunities, identifying support systems and agents, practicing smart goal setting, and attaining goals. Opportunities to return to this portfolio will be built into the major courses for purposes of ongoing assessment, reflection and planning.

FA 202 | EMOTIONAL COMPETENCE FOR ADULTS (2-4 quarter hours) | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

We've all known people who were brilliant but ineffective because they couldn't manage themselves or learn to interact with others. It is nearly impossible to be successful at work or beyond without balancing thinking and feeling and developing skills in self-awareness, self-regulation, and interpersonal communication. This course will examine a framework of emotional competence and its application to a variety of settings, with special emphasis on abilities required to work effectively in teams. Readings will be drawn from emotional intelligence as it relates to the workplace, to parenting and public education, and to personal growth. In addition, film will be used to demonstrate these abilities and to inspire us to work toward our own development. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 206 | HUMAN RESOURCES CASE STUDIES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

HR professionals will tell you that liking people is not a good reason to go into their field. In fact, it sometimes seems likely that HR decisions are made with anything but the human element in mind. Is business in general a field which fits into the human community or is it something which exists outside our social structures and social rules? In this course, students will examine a variety of examples of how people act at work, and how the vicissitudes of the workplace influence their lives. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 208 | SUCCESSFUL SALES AND MARKETING MANAGEMENT FOR BUSINESS TODAY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Sales Management is one of the most important jobs in business today. It is the focal point for managing customer relations, and is critical for sustaining profitability and growth. It draws on a broad spectrum of skills and offers many desirable career paths for both entry level as well as experienced workers. Sales Management techniques are applicable in a wide variety of business settings, and the basic framework and details apply in all of them. The purpose of this course is to present a practical, contemporary framework for Sales Management. It starts with basic sales analysis techniques for determining company position in the market. From there it explores modern sales techniques for facilitating the customer's buying decision. It then covers the major Sales Management job functions, such as Territory Management and Sales Training. The course concludes with a discussion of leadership and psychological skills that make for Sales Management excellence. Students will learn Sales Management via course lectures, textbook reading, Internet searches and independent research on the company they work for.(2-4 quarter hours)

FA 209 | CONSUMER BEHAVIOR INSIGHTS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In the Consumer Behavior Insights course, students explore the processes that consumers use to make decisions. Understanding of consumer segments is developed and applied to create communication strategies using a decision-making framework. Through coursework, students demonstrate an understanding of various topics including how market intelligence is collected, market segmentation, the impact of various cultural influences on behavior, elements of persuasive communication and development of consumer-oriented strategies. Cultural norms influence receptivity to marketing communication messages. In-depth consumer knowledge of a sub-cultural segment is learned and applied as students conduct market research. Based on analysis, students develop communication objectives, positioning statements and strategies for consumer communication. The role of mass media is examined in two distinct areas. Mass media influence cultural values by reinforcing norms for consumer needs and wants. Mass media are also important means for communication of targeted advertising messages. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 214 | ENTREPRENEURIAL ACCOUNTING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Entrepreneurial Accounting is a thorough coverage of financial and management accounting topics in an economically challenging business environment. Clear principles and procedures are used to demonstrate the complete accounting cycle in any type of organization: For-Profit or Non-Profit. General purpose financial statements are prepared and examined from a fundamental understanding of how for-profit and non-profit businesses operate in a dynamic and changing business marketplace. Specifically, the reach of this course will be on a global environment that is characterized by a high degree of uncertainty. We will examine a variety of accounting challenges faced by business from an international perspective. This will have important implications on the way a company becomes more competitive and thus profitable. As such each of you will be assigned a company on day one of class to manage through a series of accounting dilemmas often both inside and outside our borders. As you acquire the requisite skills (throughout the term) to meet those challenges you'll execute decisions that will change the management course of the company. It is through this individual decision making that you'll learn what works and what doesn't and why. This is not a static accounting course. Your decisions will have an impact on the direction of the company. We will also cover a series of topics that will enhance your understanding of financing techniques and options through detailed ratio-analysis. This will advance your ability to understand and seek creative financing for any ideas you might have in the future. This is essential if you have that entrepreneurial spark that just needs some financial backing and support to get started. As this is an accounting course we would expect some proficiency in basic quantitative /mathematical ability. You should also be able to use a calculator reasonably well. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 220 | DEVELOPING CONSULTING SKILLS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will help students learn how to start and operate a consulting business enterprise. Materials will address consulting purposes, skills, and techniques. Through class discussions and exercises, readings and assignments, students will learn how to create, organize, and operate a consulting enterprise. Students will review detailed analyses of consulting proposals, contracting, client needs and expectations, needs analyses and evaluation, project planning, data collection and analysis, resistance, client relationships, change management, feedback, pricing, presentation and facilitation skills, and ethical considerations. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 223 | ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE PRINCIPLES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, we will examine the role of accounting and financial management in the preparation, reporting and analysis of financial information. This topic is particularly important in today?s economically challenging business world. Accounting and Finance concepts and principles serve as the bookends for our exploration. Clear principles and procedures are used to capture financial data, which can then be used to make economic and financial decisions. Specifically, the objective of this course is to present the fundamentals of accounting and finance to assist the non-accountant in understanding the financial statements of an organization and how financial information can be used in the management planning, control, and decision-making processes of both profit and non-profit seeking enterprises. Accounting is often called the language of business and as such, it is appropriate that as participants in the economic activities of our society we should have enough knowledge of this language to make informed decisions and judgments about our role in these economic activities. We will also cover a series of topics that will enhance your understanding of financial information, financing techniques and options through financial and ratio-analysis. This will advance your ability to understand and make relevant financing and investment decisions or develop viable future business strategies. (2-4 credit hours)

FA 224 | LAW, JUSTICE & HOMELAND SECURITY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Homeland Security agencies design and implement plans to thwart threats and manage responses to imminent and prolonged danger. In this course, we investigate the functional integration and coordination of federal, state and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations which respond to threats against safety and security. Students examine the current threat and response landscape, determining its strengths and weaknesses by using models and case studies of homeland security scenarios and their tactical foundations. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 231 | FINANCIAL PLANNING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will help students organize their financial lives by learning and implementing selected principles of accounting, finance, and management. The course will address value and risk determination by dealing specifically with the analysis of one's financial status, goal setting and planning, and decision making. Risk analysis, savings and investment principles, taxes, debt management, retirement, and estate considerations are areas which guide the financial management of individuals and businesses alike. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 236 | MARKETING YOU: COMMUNICATING YOUR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY ON AND OFFLINE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In the emerging world of cloud computing and in the context of a competitive global economy, communicating one's personal brand effectively either virtually or offline will become increasingly important. In this hybrid course, students use innovative tools and approaches to assess their unique strengths and weaknesses, passions and prior learning, and expertise and experience to identity their personal brand, plan career goals, and create or add to a career ePortfolio. Theoretical frameworks that address opportunities and risks associated with hyperconnectivity as well as concerns about managing personal, professional, and social identities are also explored. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 237 | CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND CLIENT RELATIONS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to a variety of strategies for conflict management and negotiation. Students will engage in a number of hands-on activities to develop skills that will benefit them in and beyond the workplace. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 238 | ENGAGING RESILIENCE IN ADULT LIFE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Building & Engaging Resilience (in Adult Life) (4 credit hours) (Fac: Matamonasa) ? An ancient proverb reads: ?Fall down seven times. Stand up eight.? But how? What?s involved in such flexibility, adaptability, tenacity, hardiness and resilience? What understandings, values and skills help? How does one develop these and nurture them across an adult lifetime? Through this seminar, participants will explore various concepts, models and ?best practices? for growing, rebounding and selfguarding one?s resilience?given the challenges and uncertainties of adult life. (Questions? Contact instructor at amatamo1@depaul.edu.)

FA 246 | DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to heighten the students' awareness of diversity. This may take the form of critical self-assessment of one's knowledge of diversity and/or identifying prejudices, what they are and how they began. Through group discussions, analyzing case studies and lectures, students will be provided with opportunities to gain a deeper understanding of their own prejudices and to develop a rationale for valuing human differences in their respective lives. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 254 | STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a ten week course on strategic management in organizations. Students will learn the basic concepts of strategic formulation including understanding the competitive forces, competitive advantage, strategic decisions, and the impact of the internet on strategy. Next students will look at how strategy can be applied to business, governmental, societal and global issues. Students may focus on developing a strategy for an organization for the F-X competence, or look at strategy from a governmental or societal prospective with the H-1-I competence, or analyze the strategy of a country or global issue for the H5 competence. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 260 | ESSENTIALS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of Project Management for non-Project Managers. It introduces the four phases of the project management process: Initiating, Planning, Managing, and Closing; the role of the Project Manager; tools, techniques and deliverables associated with successful project management; and troubleshooting techniques. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 269 | ENTREPRENEURSHIP: HOW TO FIND AND FUND YOUR DREAM | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Did you know that 90% of new restaurants are doomed to fail? Have you always wanted to be your own boss? Are you presently conducting a small business from your garage that you'd like to make bigger and more profitable? Who makes a great entrepreneur? Are businesses easier to manage in the age of technology? In this course, Students will learn how to identify an appropriate small business for their talents and time restrictions. Learners will also consider methods of financing their dream work lives, and review the pit falls awaiting new businesses in today's economic climate. Students need not have a business in mind, but must be willing to consider how they might go about putting together a plan for a successful venture. Ideas about the definition of business in modern society, of entrepreneurship, about the psychological make up of the successful small business owner, and about the long term view for small businesses will also be covered. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 270 | STARTING UP AND RUNNING YOUR OWN BUSINESS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will help students learn how to start and operate an independent business enterprise. We will address entrepreneurship, defining your markets, accounting basics, business plans, financing, establishing the business, hiring employees, business equipment, software, and marketing. Through readings, discussion, and home assignments, students will learn how to increase the probability of reaching their business goals while minimizing risks and costs. By applying management, financial, and software concepts and practices, students will have the knowledge to start and run a new business. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 278 | EFFECTIVE WORKPLACE PERFORMANCE THROUGH COLLABORATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students examine models of effective performance management, within and beyond institutions of banking. We study the connections between organizational and employee goals, giving special attention to the role of collaborative teamwork. Strategies for effective measurement of performance, both individual and group-level, are examined in the light of the need for continuous performance improvement. Course-based collaborative projects offer an opportunity to apply concepts to everyday-worklife scenarios. (2-6 hours)

FA 288 | MARKETING FOR THE SOCIAL GOOD | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a ten week course on the nonprofit and public organizational issue of social marketing. Generally social marketing techniques are used to influence individuals, or groups to change their behavior in order to improve a social good such as: individual health, the environment, and the community. Students will develop an appreciation for the principles of social marketing and will be taught the techniques for conducting social marketing programs. Students will also learn how to develop social marketing plans and meaningful promotions, including utilizing imagery/art to understand and create advertisements. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 300 | PROJECT MANAGEMENT | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Project Management is a business concept which has received a great deal of attention over the last few years. Business managers are discovering that the complexity of human and technological systems forces workers to organize, prepare, and monitor project development in a way which was not necessary in simpler times. In this course, students will discuss and discover methods of project organization and execution which will help them achieve efficacy and success in the workplace. This course will cover concepts in describing project goals, setting priorities, identifying needs, and designing realistic time lines. Students will learn how to execute successful projects from start to finish. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 301 | EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP IN A CHANGING PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this leadership course, students will use readings, behavior/trait surveys, and case studies to understand leadership theories and models. Participants will learn to create, establish, and reinforce cultural rules of engagement designed to increase communication effectiveness and get the most out of the current human dynamic in their respective environments. Understanding these various leadership models allows students to reflect on their own style in today's culturally changing environments. (online) (2 credit hours)

FA 302 | PROJECT MANAGEMENT: DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Project Management is an important discipline that can benefit students in their careers as well as personal life. This course will explore project management methodologies, their common steps and tools. The course translates Project Management theory into a practical and effective methodology, starting with working definitions of Project and Project Management, the course examines project initiation, evaluation and organization using analytic techniques such as discounted cash flow and PERT/CPM. In addition, the course examines project execution and control, along with the documentation and communications skills needed to keep a project on track. The course concludes with an overview of project management applied to computer information systems development. (2 quarter hours)

FA 303 | INDEPENDENT ADVANCED PROJECT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This required course is a problem-solving experience which represents the culmination of an SNL student's learning in a specific area. Students, guided by their academic committee, design and execute an independent project which demonstrates the integration of theory and practice, and the ability to pursue and document avenues of inquiry with excellence. * Successful completion of Research Seminar is required before registration. This course satisfies a residency requirement.

LL 300 is a prerequisite for this class.

FA 304 | ADVANCED PROJECT COURSE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The main purpose of this course is to guide you through the various steps involved in designing and carrying out an Advanced Project (AP) on a subject that is related to your particular focus Area (FA). Whether you want to address a practical problem or a theoretical question, in this course you will be guided through the process of investigating a problem or issue in depth, and establishing clear links between the definition of the problem or issue, discussion of conceptual issues, methods of investigations, analysis of findings, and practical applications. Successful completion of the Advanced Project will satisfy the F-11 and F-12 competences. This course satisfies a residency requirement.

LL 300 is a prerequisite for this class. This class is not open to BAC students.

FA 305 | CAPSTONE IN SAFETY AND SECURITY MANAGEMENT | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course guides students to create an applied artifact expressing the core skills and knowledge developed in the public safety and security management concentration. An implementation plan, an assessment of effectiveness, and a self-assessment of learning complete the capstone project. In addition, students will work to articulate the personal and social value of lifelong learning, assessing their learning in the competence-based undergraduate program, and articulating connections to future personal and professional goals.

FA 309 | STARTING A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Starting a new business is now more possible than ever. All businesses start as an idea but not all ideas are good ones. To decide that an idea is worth a major time, career and financial investment, it is best to critically evaluate its likelihood of success in light of the marketplace, the competition, the economic environment, its financial costs and opportunities, and the needs of the entrepreneur. In this course, students learn evaluation techniques for determining the business viability of a new idea and methods of performing an overall critical financial analysis with special focus on spotting business environment marketing and demographic trends. Students learn the details associated with starting a functional new business with the ultimate deliverable being a written 10-15-page business plan for a new product or service idea that would be worthy of review by potential investors. Students will work together on a group project that entails the writing of a business plan and then a Shark Tank type of group presentation to classmates for evaluation and grade. This is a challenging and potentially life-changing course. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 310 | GENDER IN BUSINESS AND LEADERSHIP | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Women's work is never done. Not only are women mothers and wives, but these days the expectation is that women will take on leadership roles outside the home as well. What makes a woman a leader? How did the workplace differ when women were not corporate leaders? Who are today's prominent female leaders and how are they shaping our future? In this course, learners will study the lives and contributions of various important women from business, politics, and social action. Students will assess equality in management and leadership, the psychological make up of the woman leader, and the ways in which women's contributions to leadership differ from men's. Furthermore, the class will endeavor to define leadership, its consequences, and its personal ramifications. Students should expect to read extensively about the lives and characteristics of contemporary women who have surfaced in leadership roles. Learners will also identify women leaders in their own workplaces and communities and assess their involvement in the corporation and/or general public. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 314 | COLLABORATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING IN POLICING | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students examine and analyze a diverse array of case studies in law enforcement to identify factors linked to successful outcomes. Special attention is given to outcomes linked to collaborative, or ?team,? action, such as community policing. We learn to apply the principles and methods of collaborative problem-solving to the current policing dilemmas experienced in class members? work lives. Students, themselves, collaborate to ?troubleshoot? experiential dilemmas, developing insights into workplace-applicable strategies.

FA 318 | UNDERSTANDING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Business managers as well as investors must have a basic understanding of financial statements as not only a management tool but also as a way of communicating the financial and operational well-being of a company. This course teaches students the essential elements of financial statements, their interpretation and their impact on investors and society. This is a particularly important topic and skill in light of the recent corporate financial reporting scandals plaguing Wall Street and the nation.(2-4 quarter hour)

FA 319 | THE VALUE OF STATISTICS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this class, students will look at how numbers add up to give us reasons to be for or against ideas. This course will center on how to create, decode, and analyze statistics. Some knowledge of mathematics is essential to understanding statistics so prior completion of the Quantitative Reasoning course or it's equivalent would be very beneficial to having success in this class. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 325 | CONNECTING THOUGHT AND BEHAVIOR IN THE WORKPLACE, THE COMMUNITY, AND IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to practical concepts of Cognitive Behavioral Psychology and offers them new perspectives on how to observe and understand the interaction between thoughts and behaviors in their daily lives. Students will evaluate the tendencies and correlations between what a person "thinks" and what that person "does" through observation and interpretation of their own experiences. A report will be generated that will include an analysis of the student's own cognitive behavioral tendencies and a plan for personal development. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 329 | DEVELOPING AND MANAGING A MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide the student with the understanding of the principles of marketing communication, the marking communication vehicles most commonly employed by corporations in America and Western Europe, and the situations in which each marketing communication vehicle may be most effectively used in an ethical manner. The students will learn both the principles of marketing communication and how to target a market demographically, geographically, and psychographically, to ensure that the marketing communication strategy developed and program executed are consistent with the "best in class" principles of marketing communications. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 330 | PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION IN THE WORKPLACE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of professional writing. Through engaging in and reflecting upon a variety of professional writing tasks, you will learn the rhetorical theory and practice necessary for effective written communication in professional contexts. (online) (2 credit hours)

FA 334 | HUMAN RESOURCE AND TALENT DEVELOPMENT FUNDAMENTALS FOR MANAGERS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed as an introduction to the practices of human resources (HR) in a corporate environment. It will target the practices that managers need to know such as recruiting, training, hiring, and terminating employees as well as the basics of HR law. Additional content that will be addressed includes headcount management, performance appraisals, learning & development, compensation basics, and grievance processes. This course will equip managers with the information they need to know without making them Human Resource experts but rather how to work effectively with their HR counterparts. (2-4 hours)

FA 335 | UNDERSTANDING RISK MANAGEMENT IN THE WORKPLACE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This overview course in risk management will introduce managers to the various types of risk that needs to be managed in the workplace. Numerous areas such as operational risk, market risk, global risk, and customer risk will be investigated. While this course is not to create students who will be experts in risk management this course will allow them to identify and analyze areas of potential risk to the assets of their organization. Students will use case studies to ensure that proper communication happens for key risks within the organization. (2-4 hours)

FA 340 | IMPLEMENTING CORPORATE TRAINING PROGRAMS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students will learn about the strategic process of effectively and efficiently implementing a corporate training program based on business drivers from design stages through measurement of results. This process includes defining requirements and success criteria, designing the process, implementing and powerfully communicating the program to the learners, and then understanding how to measure the success of the program. It is imperative to measure and report on the trends of the program and to understand why it is important. Using methodology and models that have been successful in numerous global and domestic companies, students in this course will create their own plan for implementation, communication, and measurement to ensure success in their future training program implementations. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 359 | ETHICAL BUSINESS BEHAVIOR | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Ethical Business Behavior explores the ethical issues that business decision-makers face and examines the moral principles that are used to help resolve these issues. Ethical decisions in the workplace can have tremendous influence on the individuals and the corporations involved. The outcomes of unethical behavior can affect reputations, trust and career path. Results have been as severe as loss of employment, physical harm to individuals, corporate bankruptcy and even impacts to the economy. Students are placed in decision-making roles through exercises, case studies and role-playing. Reasoning skills are honed through identification of ethical issues and alternative means to analyze these issues. Ethical behavior is evaluated using analytical skills to apply ethical concepts to business situations. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 368 | STRESS REDUCTION IN THE WORKFORCE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In the business world, the stress on a person's life and health has a direct impact on their productivity and creativity. Studies have shown that as stress increases in someone's life, their productivity at work goes down. The current state of humanity and technology has created a world with a new type of stress; the pace and speed of interaction has increased to a rate where a person has to deal with an influx of information and, often, interactions with hundreds of people per day via different technologies. In this course we will study another worldview in order to develop survival skills that reduce our stress. This different world view is the Yogic tradition from India called Kundalini Yoga. By taking this course, students will develop stress relief techniques and a sense of great purpose in their business lives. We will lower the stress level in our lives by participating in Kundalini Yoga stress reduction techniques from a video, weekly meditation exercises and textbooks.(2-4 credit hours)

FA 371 | ADVANCED CONSULTATIVE SELLING | 2-6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this six-credit-hour course, students engage a dynamic combination of learning, practice, critique, and revision to become experts in consultative selling. The interests and needs of prospective and current customers form the focal point of the methodology that is called "consultative sales." Applying critical analysis to improve actual consultative experiences provides the "advanced" angle to the active learning for this course. Customers are unique, and their individual needs must be addressed with the twin consultative forces of creativity and productivity. This course offers the content and the experiential application of consultative sales.

FA 381 | CONFLICT AND COOPERATION AMONG NATIONS: BUILDING DEMOCRACY AND A FREE MARKET IN IRAQ | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to international relations, the analysis of the actors, institutions, and events, which influence the processes of international politics, the market, and the development of strategy. The context of the course is based on the changes caused by 9-11 to international politics, markets, strategies, and the consequences of those changes. This course will use the effort to construct a democracy and a free market in Iraq as a case study to explore the larger changes occurring in the international system in the post 9-11 era. Every student will be expected to know the substance and controversies attendant to political, economic, and military developments in Iraq. Each of these areas is fundamentally critical in assessing whether building democracy in Iraq can succeed. A critical analysis of democracy in Iraq is a major goal of this course. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 387 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES IN CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is important for students who seek to gain a comprehensive understanding of African-American history in the United States. It will begin with discussions of African culture, the Atlantic Slave Trade, and early forms of slavery/indenturing. It will pay particular attention to the colonial and Revolutionary experience, delving into the mass exodus of Africans during the Revolutionary War, and African-American's role and position in the country's formative years. Enslavement, the Civil War and Reconstruction will follow as key areas of study. In every discussion, students will be asked to look for parallels between the contemporary and 18th and 19th century African-American experience and, where appropriate, to identify key social and cultural thinkers and leaders of the various historical periods. The primary texts for the course will be John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom, articles and readings written by scholars and important early African-American artists and intellectuals, and video presentations.

FA 389 | INTRODUCTION TO RESTORATIVE PEACEMAKING PRACTICES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will provide an introduction to the emerging field of restorative justice and its application in the criminal justice system, schools, workplaces, communities, families and organizational settings Restorative approaches are based on aboriginal and indigenous practices and traditions to build community, problem solve, resolve conflict, decision make, develop consensus, reconcile, celebrate and possibly heal. It is a growing movement that explores how relationships can be restored or built by recognizing the capacity of the individuals and community to identify, address and resolve their issues in a manner that meets their needs and allows them to move forward. We will examine various approaches to implementing restorative principles as well as the challenges of creating and sustaining restorative environments, initiatives and resources to support communities in developing safer and healthier relationships. The underlying dynamics that are usually at the root of conflict and alienation will also be considered to better understand and appreciate the possibilities and promise of restorative processes. (2-4 quarter hours)

FA 390 | DIVERSITY: IN AND BEYOND THE WORK PLACE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Diversity, Multiculturalism, Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer: these are all words that have historical significance and power in today's workplace. This course will examine how the United States workplace has attempted to address diversity and what have been the challenges along the way. Other aspects of life in the United States such as families, schools, churches and neighborhoods have functioned with less of an effort to represent the pluralism of society. This course will explore these differences and evaluate the experiences of the individual, organizations, and institutions from a multitude of perspectives. Students will demonstrate the competencies through class participation, group projects, journal entries and other assignments that will allow them to apply course readings, films, and discussion to their own personal experience. (2-4 quarter hours)