Social & Cultural Studies Ed Human Dev Grad (SCG)

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SCG 25 | BASIC TECHNOLOGY LITERACY | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This online course provides students with a knowledge about assembling, using, and troubleshooting basic technology hardware and software. In this course, students demonstrate understanding of basic computer setup and the use of peripheral devices such as printers, speakers, flash drives, scanners, digital cameras, videos, and computer software. (0 credit hours)

SCG 401 | ADVANCED LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Current research and theories in human development relating to motivation, personality, learning and socialization. Case studies and an analysis of various developmental problems.

SCG 402 | PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Study of the learning-teaching process with specific emphasis on the person as a learner, human capacity and potential, learning theories and materials, motivation, concept formation, and behavior.

SCG 403 | HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING: ELEMENTARY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will focus on the developmental processes of school-age children, kindergarten through middle school, by beginning with the study of the young child's social, emotional, cognitive, and physical growth and change. The theoretical and observational study of child development will be framed by an examination of culture, gender, and socio-economic factors as they inform assumptions about normative processes. The relationship between development and learning in a social context will be examined with particular attention to children's developing concepts in math, science, and language arts. Attention will also be given to the role of teachers and schools and other institutions in fostering the healthy development and learning of young people.

SCG 404 | CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the growth and development of the young child in sociocultural context, from conception through age eight, including cognitive, language, physical, psychosocial, spiritual, creative, and emotional areas of development. Learning and development theories of young children, including those of Freud, Erikson, Garcia-Coll, Ainsworth, Bowlby, Piaget, Rogoff, Spencer, Vygotsky, Bronfenbrenner, and other modern developmental theorists, are explored. This course examines normative assumptions about children's processes of growth and change, and considers how learning and development occur through relationships in social contexts. The pedagogical implications of theories of development and of differences amongst children will be addressed throughout class discussions, child observations, and other course activities. This course requires 35 hours of field experience, working with infants and toddlers in a group care setting. Co-registration in T&L 480: Internship with Infants and Toddlers is recommended and encouraged.

SCG 406 | HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING:SECONDARY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on the multiple factors that contribute to the period of adolescence, bridging childhood and adulthood. Particular attention is given to the intrapsychic, interpersonal, biological, and socio-cultural processes that are mediated by the meanings that youth give to their identity vis a vis race, class, and gender formations within the broader society. Students will engage in interdisciplinary study of theories to examine the implications for teaching and learning processes and the role of educational institutions in fostering the healthy development of youth in society. Forms of inquiry will include students' examination of their own lives and assumptions, critique of theory, and observations of young people in a variety of contexts.

SCG 408 | EDUCATION AND SOCIETY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A study of social forces that impinge upon the educational enterprise and analysis of the relationship to major social problems in urban education with emphasis on their social, economic, political, historical and philosophical dimensions.

SCG 409 | SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on the relationship between school structures and culture, social relations of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and ideologies organizing education in the United States. Students will explore a range of theories in the sociology of education and explore linkages between school structures and processes and broader social forces. Readings may examine the political economy of schooling, inequalities in educational practices, and student and teacher identities shaped by schools and the larger society.

SCG 410 | INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH: PURPOSES, ISSUES, AND METHODOLOGIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

(formerly CUG 400) This course will examine the basic questions, issues and theoretical frameworks central to the purpose, conceptualization, conduct, writing, reading and the use of educational research as a means for informing educational theory, practice and policy. Students will be exposed to the multiple frameworks which inform education research, the various methodologies employed in collecting and analyzing data and will examine the advantages, limitations and values implicit in conducting and evaluating research.

SCG 411 | PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the relationship of education to the moral and ethical dilemmas or predicaments of the human condition. It will entail issues related to the nature of education's responsiveness, or lack there of, to the concerns of the human condition: for example, human alienation, suffering, success and failure, caring, freedom, responsibility, liberation and agency. Special attention will be given to how these concerns influences or have social, cultural and political implications for how teachers address them within the teaching and learning process.

SCG 435 | YOUNG ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT IN CONTEXT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course considers how race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexuality inform teachers' perceptions of early adolescent development. It also examines middle grades teaching practices and has students analyze how those practices shape the growth and educational/learning experiences of early adolescents. It promotes a broad understanding of social, cultural, and historical conceptions of adolescence, and critically examines the complexities of the physical, social, intellectual, and emotional processes of growth and change of young adolescents. It explores the range of social contexts, interpersonal relationships, and societal views, which influence and give meaning to the development and learning of middle grade youth. This course uses observational experiences, reflective inquiry and interdisciplinary theories to prepare middle grades teacher candidates to design classroom experiences that reflect and are sensitive to the socio-cultural contexts and realities of diverse middle grades learners. ***The course meets in the afternoon and integrates community and/or after school field experience with young adolescents into coursework. Co-requisite for this course is MGE 400. In this course, students will: 1.

SCG 439 | PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It considers how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling, and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn. 10 - 15 field experience hours are required as part of this course.

SCG 451 | DOING CRITICAL PRACTITIONER RESEARCH IN EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to different approaches to education research and research methods with a focus on critical practitioner research. Students will become discerning readers of educational research and be able to design and conduct research related to teaching and learning in a variety of disciplinary areas (English, history/social sciences, mathematics, or science) at the secondary level. They will develop skills to critically examine and reflect on practice in the classroom through discipline-specific research projects. Taken concurrently with TCH 481, TCH 482, TCH 483, TCH 484.

T&L 425 and status as an Education graduate student are prerequisites for this class. SCG 451 has a co-requisite of TCH 481, or TCH 482, or TCH 483, or TCH 484.

SCG 527 | GLOBAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Studies of school systems outside the United States, their methods, curriculum and achievements.

SCG 582 | PRACTICUM IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND NEW MEDIA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides directed experiences in decision-making for curriculum planning, instructional design and delivery, scholarship and leadership in instructional technology-supported learning contexts. Students will engage in co-teaching activities in technology-rich classrooms; develop an instructional technology plan; make field evaluation and use of educational hardware and software; review and discuss research and professional literature in instructional technology; evaluate and use instructional products; develop and present a multimedia-based project; learn and apply theories and principles of instructional and information message design; engage in collaborative, micro-teaching activities online; develop a technology-enhanced instructional program for the K-12 environment; create a staff development plan with focus on technology applications for administrative purposes; conduct an evaluation study on-site; observe and experiment face-to-face and virtually with a range of instructional technology applications; produce comparative reviews on the use of instructional technology in various school settings. The practicum will also provide students with multiple opportunities to reflect and share their thinking with each other in a supportive community of learners and researchers. (Prerequisites: SCG 402 & CS 460).

SCG 588 | INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS IN EDUCATION | 1-4.5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Independent Study in Social and Cultural Foundations in Education. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor, program chair and associate dean. (Variable credit)

SCG 600 | REGISTERED STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is open to students who are not registered for any other courses but need to complete requirements/assignments for previously taken courses. It provides access to University facilities. Permission of advisor required. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 603 | CULTURE AND EDUCATION SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

At its core, this course is an exploration of various ways in which culture has been conceptualized. This exploration will focus on the relationship between education, pedagogy, and theories of culture, all framed by a concern for social justice. Topics may include the pedagogical and political dimensions of popular culture, the interpretation of cultural products and expressions, and the relationship between knowledge and power in the political economy of culture production.

SCG 604 | IDENTITY: CONSTRUCTIONS AND NEGOTIATIONS SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores the self and identity as a complex and dynamic psychological, socio-historical, and cultural process, and is grounded in the theoretical frameworks in human development, cultural studies, psychoanalysis, and philosophy, including critical and postmodern perspectives in education. It examines the intersubjective experiences, social relations, institutional hierarchies, and ideological frameworks through which social identities and subject positions are created, negotiated, and transformed across educational institutions and societal culture.

SCG 608 | IDEOLOGY, POWER AND POLITICS SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines how power operates pedagogically and how domination and resistance get shaped in education. It considers how institutional ideologies and power relations in society enter into educational discourse and practice. It also explores ways in which power produces various educational practices and ways in which power gets psychically configured. Students will examine major theories of power, ideology, and politics and consider the educational implications of such an analysis.

SCG 610 | INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the basic questions, issues and theoretical frameworks central to the purpose, conceptualization, conduct, writing, reading and the use of educational research as a means for informing educational theory, practice and policy. Students will be exposed to the multiple frameworks that inform educational research and the various methodologies employed in collecting and analyzing data, and will examine the advantages, limitations and ethical issues relating to conducting and evaluating research.

SCG 611 | PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION, CULTURE AND ETHICS SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines philosophical questions regarding the moral and ethical meaning and purpose of education. Some of the questions explored are the nature of freedom, liberation, individuality, human difference, community, knowledge, reality, emotion, democracy, politics, aesthetics, self and other. In considering these questions in the context of education, particular attention is given to the philosophy of culture.

SCG 614 | CRITICAL MEDIA LITERACY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on theories of media interpretation, cultural pedagogy, and cultural studies. Literature from critical media literacy, cultural studies, critical pedagogy, communication studies, sociology, and philosophy will inform student understanding of how media educates, how interpretations of media are struggled over, and how such practices relate to broader structures of power, identity formation, political economy of media, theories of communication and representation, and pedagogy.

SCG 615 | THEORIZING IN EDUCATION, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores philosophical and sociological theories of education, technology and society. Topics include the social, political, and pedagogical implications of educational technology and new media. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the history of critical theoretical perspectives on educative technologies through foundational texts in the humanities and social sciences as well as contemporary studies in the multiple educative aspects of technology. Course readings will draw on scholarship in philosophy, sociology, new media, educational foundations, and political theory.

SCG 617 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS IN EDUCATION: | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will provide students with an opportunity for critical examination of issues in the social and cultural foundations of education. Topics could include: educational theory; social context of education; education and social justice; education and social transformation, educational policy; and issues in educational reform.

SCG 625 | CANDIDACY CULMINATING PROJECT (STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING) | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing culminating projects for their program of study, including theses, papers, and final portfolios. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of thesis/capstone advisor required each term. Registration limited to three terms. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 627 | GLOBAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Studies of school systems outside the United States, their methods, curriculum and achievements.

Status as an EDD student with a Global Catholic Educational Leadership concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 635 | ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODOLOGIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course builds on fundamental principles of educational research first introduced in SCG 610. It provides students with experience conducting qualitative research, with particular attention to developing skills in various methods of data collection and analysis.

SCG 610 is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 636 | THESIS RESEARCH | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A student writing a thesis registers for this course for four quarter hours of credit. Where the thesis research and the writing of the thesis itself are prolonged beyond the usual time, the program advisor may require the student to register for additional credit. Completion of this course is required to receive the MA Degree in Social and Cultural Foundations in Education.

SCG 637 | CAPSTONE: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS IN EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The SCFE Capstone allows students to explore substantive areas of scholarship within their areas of interest and to create a final project or paper of their own design under the mentorship of a faculty member in the program. The Capstone is an opportunity to engage in a synthesis of what has been learned through coursework, and to integrate and compare knowledge gained from students' own research with that which was learned in the program. The capstone course will involve preparation of a substantive piece of work. Upon completion of all coursework, students enrolled in this course will select and work with a Capstone Advisor (a faculty member in the SCFE program) to discuss possible paper topics. The paper will generally consist of library-based research and will typically be 20-25 pages in length. Completion of this course is required to receive the MEd Degree in Social and Cultural Foundations in Education.

SCG 701 | PHILOSOPHY OF ETHICS IN EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course applies a philosophical lens to examine the structure and meaning of ethics within k-12 schools and universities, and beyond formal educational settings. Education, a condition for self-formation and self-other relations, is explored as a site of ethical inquiry. It is within this framework that education, which involves learning, teaching, response, and communication, is posed as a condition of ethical possibility and not merely as the vehicle through which a certain ethics gets carried out. Primary and secondary philosophical and non-philosophical literature will be used to study these issues.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 711 | CULTURE, POWER AND EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides a critical understanding of the larger concept of culture within the notion of multiculturalism. This begins by recognizing that k-12 schools and universities are cultural institutions engaged in the making of culture. While the focus of multiculturalism is about theorizing difference in relation to the particular cultural processes that go on in schools and universities, its focus does not address how educational institutions are shaped by broader cultural dynamics outside of the immediate context of educational institutions. It is in this context that students will examine how cultural processes are intimately connected with social relations of class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. They will also explore how culture involves power, which serves to produce inequalities in the abilities of individuals and social groups to define and realize their needs. In addition, culture will be analyzed as a site of social difference and struggle.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 721 | HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will examine the process of human development and learning through the ages by critically examining cross-cultural research and developmental theories designed to describe and interpret the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and psychological processes involved. Emphasis will be placed on the range of individual, familial, environmental, and cultural factors that may enhance or inhibit human growth and development, and on the critical role that human relationships play in the lifelong interactive processes of learning and growth. Considerable attention will be paid to the historical role of power, culture, class, gender and capability in defining and interpreting certain behaviors as indicators of normative development. These normative indicators will be critiqued with regard to underlying cultural assumptions and values, their function in fostering and maintaining current social, educational and political relations, and their contribution to the current crises in urban education and the development of children and youth. Class participants will examine their perspective on human development and learning and explore the socio-cultural and historical bases which contribute to their underlying values and assumptions. Through multifaceted inquiry utilizing self-reflection, case studies, theoretical analyses, and child assessment and observation, participants will consider the implications for their work as educational leaders in approaching current challenges with students, parents, community, and teachers and in creating schools that will foster societal change to support the healthy development of children and youth.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 735 | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to provide doctoral level students with theoretical and practical preparation in quantitative research design including: instrumentation; data collection; statistical analysis; ethics and politics of the conduct of research; and development of analytical skills for critiquing quantitative research. Students will have the opportunity to work with real databases to conduct both univariate and multivariate analyses, including correlations, ANOVAS, and multiple regressions. Prerequisite: SCG 785.

(SCG 785 and status as an EDD student) or (SCG 775 and status as an EdS student) are prerequisites for this class.

SCG 745 | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to provide doctoral level students with theoretical and practical preparation in qualitative methods including: data collection and analysis; ethics and the politics of the conduct of research; and critical analytical skills for review and critique of qualitative research. Students will be introduced to a range of approaches to qualitative inquiry that may include: narrative inquiry; ethnography; case study; phenomenology; grounded theory; and participatory action research from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: SCG 785.

(SCG 785 and status as an EDD student) or (SCG 775 and status as an EdS student) are prerequisites for this class.

SCG 755 | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A continuation of SCG 735. Students will prepare a methodology section of a research project and will learn how to write up quantitative results of their analyses. By the end of the course students should be able to: understand quantitative methodological approaches; select appropriate data collection strategies; and conduct the appropriate analysis for the research question(s) proposed and the nature of the data.

SCG 735 and status as an EDD or EdS student are prerequisites for this class.

SCG 765 | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A continuation of SCG 745. Students will conduct a pilot study on an issue of interest using a qualitative research design. By the end of the course students should be able to: understand qualitative methodological approaches; select appropriate data collection strategies; and conduct the appropriate analysis for the research question(s) proposed and the nature of the data.

SCG 745 and status as an EDD or EdS student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 775 | SEMINAR: FRAMEWORKS OF INQUIRY IN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course offers doctoral students a general introduction to theory and practice in educational research. First, it is designed to help students develop an understanding of the assumptions that underlie multiple approaches to knowledge construction and the conduct of inquiry in education. Second, the course will introduce students to the structural organization of a research manuscript. By the end of the course students should be able to: understand key theoretical and methodological issues in educational inquiry; engage in the critical analysis of multiple educational frameworks; recognize the components of a research manuscript; and identify a general topic area for dissertation research.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 785 | SEMINAR: FRAMEWORKS OF INQUIRY IN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Drawing upon the knowledge and skills developed in Frameworks of Inquiry I, this course is designed to enhance students' ability to critically analyze existing research as a crucial element in completing their own doctoral research. Emphasis will be placed on the preparation of a critical literature review. By the end of the course students should be able to: review the components of a research proposal; develop further the ability to evaluate research critically; conduct a literature review that will involve interpretation, evaluation, and synthesis of literature on a topic of their choice; and refine a topic for dissertation research.

SCG 775 and status as an EDD student is a prerequisite for this class.