Early Childhood Education (ECE)

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ECE 91 | CLINICAL EXPERIENCES WITH INFANTS AND TODDLERS | 1 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates will observe and interact with infants and toddlers (25 clock hours) and attend a weekly seminar in which they will be required to reflect on their experiences in relation to the development and learning processes of infants and toddlers. Appropriate early childhood lesson planning and assessment techniques and tools will be emphasized. COREQUISITE: ECE 290. (1 credit hour)

ECE 92 | CLINICAL EXPERIENCES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN AND FAMILIES | 1 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates will observe and interact with young children and their families in school and child care settings with family/parent education programs; family conferences and home visits will be included in the options. (25 clock hours). Candidates will meet once a week in a seminar to reflect and discuss topics around parental involvement, parental support, and building communities through connections between schools and homes. COREQUISITE: ECE 302. (1 credit hour)

ECE 93 | CLINICAL EXPERIENCES WITH PRE-SCHOOLERS | 1 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates will observe and interact with preschool age children (25 clock hours) and attend a weekly seminar in which they will be required to reflect on their experiences in relation to the development and learning processes of preschool age children. Appropriate early childhood assessment and instructional methodologies will be emphasized. COREQUISITE: ECE 310. (1 credit hour)

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 94 | CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN PRIMARY GRADES | 1 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates will observe and interact with primary age children (25 clock hours) and attend a weekly seminar in which they are required to reflect on their experiences in relation to the development and learning processes in the primary years (K-3). Appropriate assessment and instructional methodologies for children in the primary grades will be emphasized. COREQUISITE: ECE 311. (1 credit hour)

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 175 | EDUCATING THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY YOUNG CHILD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Course is for students with interests in early childhood programs in the United States. Course explores issues influencing early childhood education, such as socio-historical factors, family policy, diversity, and federal/state regulations. Students examine programs using readings from the Vincentian Collection, child psychology, social theories and the current media. Students compare Vincentian Heritage, current and past federal policies, applying this study to their understanding of social justice to modern childcare practices. To guide students deeper into understanding the lives of young children, the course offers an option for service learning with Jumpstart, Chicago-area Head Start, and other early childhood education centers.

ECE 280 | INTERNSHIP WITH INFANTS AND TODDLERS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates conduct 75 hours of intense supervised fieldwork in an infant/toddler center where they are observing and documenting behavior and interactions, planning activities, and assessing development in children ages birth to 3. Candidates will also participate in a twice a quarter, hour and a half, seminar to reflect and discuss aspects of infant/toddler development and care, making connections between theory and practice. Onsite meetings with groups of candidates will be held weekly for supervision and reflection on practice. Co-requisite ECE 290. (2 credit hours)

ECE 286 | ART, MUSIC, AND MOVEMENT FOR THE YOUNG CHILD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on the theory, research, methods, and activities of art, music, and movement for young children birth through age 8. Emphasis will be on the integration of developmental domains, creative and critical thinking as developmental domains are integrated.

ECE 290 | CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines human growth and development of the child from pregnancy through age eight, including cognitive, language, physical, social, spiritual, creative, and emotional areas of development. Learning and development theories of young children, including those of Freud, Erikson, Bowlby, Piaget, Vygotsky, Bronfenbrenner, and other modern developmental theorists are explored. Pedagogical implications of these developmental theories are embedded in class discussions and course activities. COREQUISITE: ECE 280.

ECE 298 | CHILD HEALTH SAFETY AND NUTRITION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the interrelationships among child, family and the areas of health, safety and nutrition. Special emphasis will be placed upon the issues of health, safety and nutrition that affect young children from the ages of birth through age 8. Understanding cultural issues and special needs of individual children are addressed, as are aspects of health and safety. Central to this course is the acquisition of knowledge and application of practices that promote good nutrition, dental health, and the physical, social and emotional well being of young children. The course includes information on common diseases and health problems.

ECE 302 | CHILD AND FAMILY IN THE URBAN COMMUNITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on understanding the diversity of children and families in approaches to development, learning, and disability. Strategies in developing positive and supportive relationships with families of young children with special needs, including family-centered practices, will be explored. Particular attention is given to the challenges faced by teachers and other professionals in early intervention in assessing children?s needs and providing services, which are reflective of the child's development within his/her diverse cultural and community context. In addition, the course examines ways to develop and maintain productive and collaborative relationships among professionals and families, communities, and other professionals across the range of support systems in the IFSP and IEP planning processes.

ECE 303 | INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to the professional ethics of early childhood education and the critical role of federal policy in the evolution of the field. Historical, sociological, philosophical, and psychological foundations of early childhood education are explored. Of special interest is a review of key theories and research that inform the development of early childhood education goals and practices, as well as administrative, pedagogical, and ethical professional standards for working with children from diverse communities. The course includes foci on Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP), inclusive pedagogical practice, appropriate use of technology with young children, and various curricular models: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, High Scope, and Creative Curriculum.

ECE 306 | FUNCTIONAL BEHAVIOR ASSESSMENT: INTERVENTION AND SUPPORT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to prepare early childhood pre-service teachers to work with children who present a variety of challenging behaviors in the classroom. Grounded in principles of Applied Behavior Analysis, the philosophy of the course is based on the premise that understanding the underlying causes of children's externalizing and internalizing behavior enables the teacher to utilize appropriate techniques in conducting behavior intervention and classroom management. Using Positive Behavioral Support and Functional Behavior Analysis (a competency required for all teachers under the provisions of IDEA), students will learn how to design and develop a Behavior Intervention Plan. Diverse methods for addressing a variety of behaviors are explored and practiced through field-based assignments that also include application of behavioral assessment and intervention tools, as well as techniques.

ECE 290 and edu major or minor

ECE 307 | LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (BIRTH TO 8) | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines language acquisition and development in young children, including culturally and linguistically diverse learners and children with atypical language development. Attention will be given to dialectical issues as these apply to growth and development of linguistic competencies through the early childhood years. Explored in this course are the core topics of linguistic?morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonetics, and phonology. Psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic theories anchor the discussion of language learning in childhood. Issues of language delay and processing of symbolic information to facilitate the development of articulation, fluency, voice, and functional language are included.

ECE 290 and edu major or minor

ECE 309 | YOUNG EXCEPTIONAL CHILD: METHODS AND CHARACTERISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a survey of the field of early childhood special education, including the Early Intervention System. Characteristics of infants, toddlers, and young children with special needs are examined in this course. Methods of working with different disabilities during children's early years will be explored. Strengths and needs of families of young children with disabilities and collaboration with family members will be emphasized. Understanding the impacts of current legislation, policy, and research on practice is fostered and developed. Completing 15 hours of field experience in an early childhood special education setting is a part of this course's requirements.

ECE 290 and edu major or minor

ECE 310 | PREPRIMARY PROGRAMS: CURRICULUM AND STRATEGIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates will plan, implement, and evaluate activities that promote the physical, emotional, social, spiritual, cognitive, and creative development of preschool children from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Emphasis will be placed on creating learning environments that facilitate children's learning through play. Developmentally appropriate practices, with a particular emphasis on social studies, use of technology, and learning centers will be thoroughly investigated. COREQUISITE: ECE 381.

ECE 290 and edu major or minor

ECE 311 | CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN PRIMARY GRADES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an examination of the objectives, content methods and materials used in the primary grades of elementary schools (K-3). A variety of teaching methods and classroom management strategies will be discussed and illustrated, including teacher-led and student-centered instruction. Candidates will be encouraged to reflect upon their own emerging educational philosophies and teaching styles as they take part in laboratory and clinical experiences. Many opportunities for planning, using and evaluating a variety of teaching methods will be offered. Each student will develop at least one teaching unit on a primary social studies theme. COREQUISITE: ECE 382.

ECE 290, ECE 310 and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

ECE 312 | BILINGUAL THEORY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to equip bilingual and second language teachers with the knowledge and philosophy to work effectively in the education of early childhood language minority students in the context of bilingual/ESL programs. The course will explore the historical, political and legal foundations of bilingual education programs in the United States. It will examine different models of bilingual programs and the psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic principles upon which they are based.

ECE 313 | CROSS CULTURAL STUDIES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will discuss the historical, philosophical and cultural foundations of education of young children in a multicultural society, emphasizing the role of ethnicity and cultural variables in development of young children within the context of families, childcare centers, and educational systems. Topics include: history of immigration and predictions for the future; the effects of population shifts on the education of English Language Learners and their families; the impact of laws, litigation and executive orders on bilingual/English-as-a-Second-Language education; understanding cultural and linguistic differences regarding locating and using educational resources.

ECE 314 | METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on best practices in teaching English Language Learners, helping them to learn English while maintaining their native language, in bilingual/ESL early childhood classrooms, from birth through age 8. Candidates will demonstrate competencies with different approaches and methodologies currently used to support the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in social and academic contexts in learners' first and second language. Curriculum- based assessment, cultural awareness, and self-reflective practice will also be addressed.

ECE 325 | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND EARLY LITERACY DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the process of learning and using a second language. Research in second language acquisition (SLA) is multi-disciplinary in nature, reflecting the complexity of language learning and use. Linguistic, psychological and social processes that underlie language learning and use will be introduced and applied to the understanding of this learning in young children. Language acquisition theory concerning relationships between early literacy and oral language development in first and subsequent languages will be explored. Understanding developed through this exploration will then be applied to the classroom in the form of strategies and literacy development activities.

ECE 326 | PRINCIPLES AND STRATEGIES FOR FAMILY ADVOCACY AND ACTION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course develops knowledge and skills to assist families of young children who face the stress of living in poverty. The focus will be on developing empathetic relationships with families so that family service and education can be optimized. Candidates will be assisted in learning to identify community resources and ways to support families in accessing resources. A focal point will be on ways to empower families, recognizing family strengths and respect for cultural variables, as they apply.

ECE 302 and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

ECE 327 | IMPACT OF PUBLIC POLICY ON FAMILIES OF YOUNG CHILDREN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is grounded in social justice practice and designed to promote an understanding of the ethical principles, legal issues, policies, and law influencing the well being of families, including those families of young children with disabilities and those who are English Language Learners. A particular focus will be on how federal childcare and education policy affects and shapes early childhood practice and service delivery to families. This course explores historical development of laws and public policy affecting families. Ethics and ethical implications of social change will be explored.

ECE 328 | WORKING WITH FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES AND CHRONIC ILLNESS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will strengthen the knowledge and skills of early childhood educators and other professionals working with young children in cultural competency (at the individual and institutional level), family-centered care, family-professional partnerships, family-directed practices, and family empowerment. Candidates will develop best practices to assure the health and well being of children and their families and to honor the strengths, cultures, traditions and expertise that everyone brings to this relationship.

ECE 329 | YOUNG CHILDREN'S LITERATURE AND FAMILY LITERACY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This class explores the joys of reading and provide strategies for candidates to awaken and encourage the joy of reading in the children and families with whom they work. It focuses on how early childhood educators are uniquely positioned to foster literacy in children and their families through thoughtful, theoretically based programming and activities.

ECE 331 | BEGINNING MATH AND SCIENCE INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course applies child development principles to the planning of science and mathematics experiences for both typically and atypically developing young children. Emphasis is placed on understanding how children develop problem-solving skills, and on recognizing how teachers can facilitate inquiry-discovery experiences for young children with diverse learning styles and needs. Course assignments include participation in experiments and field-based experiences in mathematics and sciences. Teacher candidates are required to develop and provide developmentally and culturally appropriate activities in science and mathematics activities for young children.

ECE 290 and edu major or minor

ECE 332 | EARLY LITERACY AND ASSESSMENT FOR YOUNG CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the nature of the reading process, current literacy theory and practices, and research-based instructional strategies to develop literacy skills in emergent and developing readers and young children with reading/learning disabilities. Emphasis is placed on understanding the reading process, analyzing and applying research-based instructional practices, administering, analyzing, and interpreting formal and informal reading assessments, and making informed instructional decisions to meet the unique needs of individual readers. Differences in reading abilities will be examined in light of providing appropriate, effective, and meaningful literacy instruction for young children with disabilities.

ECE 333 | EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION FOR LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on an examination of the developmental and learning characteristics of young children with low incidence disabilities. A specific focus is on educating early childhood students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and those with Intellectual Disabilities. A primary goal of this course is to understand the learning needs of these children, and to examine and evaluate various educational and therapeutic methods of working with them. A major part of this course is devoted specifically to the characteristics associated with and interventions for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

ECE 334 | SPECIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM AND STRATEGIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Study of the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for young children with high incidence disabilities. Emphasis is placed on the development of supportive learning environments, using special curricular and behavioral management strategies for all early childhood settings; application of collaborative practices with multiple service providers and families to meet the needs of diverse learners with high incidence disabilities. Strategies and materials for improving the social, emotional, and academic adjustment and functioning of young children with high incidence disabilities are examined. Includes teaching social and emotional curricula; implementing functional behavioral assessment; and monitoring growth and development in targeted areas. Strategies to increase the young child's self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem are considered. Application of diagnostic information into teaching strategies and implementation of an instructional plan (IEP) is a central tenet of the course. It is recommended for students to take ECE 290 and ECE 309 and to have 25 clock hours of Level II Experience prior to taking this class.

ECE 375 | ASSESSMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD INCLUSIVE SETTINGS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates will study, use and evaluate early childhood assessment methods and tools that are appropriate for use with young children with diverse cultural and socioeconomic experiences. Focus of the course is on the teacher candidate?s acquisition of knowledge and skills regarding an array of formal and informal assessment instruments and techniques used to gather information needed for making decisions about typical and atypical children served in individual and group learning situations. Focus is directed toward the development of curricular goals and instructional approaches that evolve from the development of curricular goals and instructional approaches that evolve from the assessment information. Such information is used to create learning plans, including Individual Family Service plans (IFSP) and Individualized Education Plan (IEP), serving child and family responsively.

ECE 290 and edu major or minor

ECE 377 | ASSESSMENT OF YOUNG BILINGUAL/ESL STUDENTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on the discussion of basic principles and current approaches to assessment of language learning students in ESL and bilingual early childhood and early elementary educational settings. Candidates will learn about the different purposes of process and product assessment tools, authentic and curriculum-based forms of assessment, issues in the assessment of English Language Learners (ELLs), and assessment in academic areas for early elementary ELLs. Research on language and literacy acquisition in multilingual learners vis a vis instruction and assessment will be discussed. Candidates will have opportunities to critically examine and learn how to administer assessment tools used in current practice.

ECE 380 | EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION PRACTICUM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Supervised teaching in a cooperating school serving young children with disabilities for 150 clock hours; arranged in collaboration with supervising faculty member and the Field Experience Office. Candidates will reflect upon their teaching experiences with young children with disabilities and collaborate with colleagues and instructor to identify alternative strategies for problematic situations. Application and approval required prior to registration. Open only to DePaul students.

ECE 381 | INTERNSHIP IN PRESCHOOL SETTING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates conduct 75 hours of intensive supervised field work in preschool during the winter quarter. The internship is designed to be taken by ECE teacher candidates before student teaching. Candidates enrolling in this internship have completed or are taking ECE 310: Preprimary Programs: Curriculum and Strategy concurrently. (2 credit hours)

ECE 290 and edu major or minor

ECE 382 | INTERNSHIP IN PRIMARY SETTING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates conduct 75 hours of intense supervised field work in a primary grade (K-3) during the spring quarter. The internship is designed for advanced ECE candidates to be taken before student teaching. Candidates taking this internship have taken ECE 311: Curriculum and Instruction in Primary Grades. (2 credit hours)

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 383 | INTERNSHIP IN EARLY CHILDHOOD ESL/BILINGUAL EDUCATION SETTINGS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on application of the theories of effective teaching practices and assessment procedures appropriate for young English Language learners. It will emphasize an application of knowledge gained from previous ESL/ELL courses and demonstration of skills necessary to work collaboratively and effectively with families of young English Language Learners. Professional behaviors that respect, value, and support all children's native language and culture will be reinforced. (100 clock hours)

ECE 313, ECE 314, ECE 325, ECE 377, and (BBE 305 and BBE 306) or (BBE 325 and BBE 366) are prerequisites for this class.

ECE 384 | EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CAPSTONE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The senior capstone course is designed to help Candidates integrate the central emphases of their liberal learning studies curriculum with their professional behavior. It will provide prospective early childhood educators with opportunities to engage in activities requiring them to be reflective, to consider value commitments, to use critical and creative thinking, and to examine their practice from a multicultural perspective as they discuss issues specific to early childhood education. Candidates will develop a professional portfolio that reflects the standards of the various guiding professional organizations. The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator, which also reflects the goals of the Liberal Studies program. This course is taken before student teaching.

ECE 385 | EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDENT TEACHING | 12 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course requires students to participate in supervised teaching at a cooperating school, five full days per week, for an academic quarter. Part of the teaching will be in a preprimary setting and part will be in a primary setting. Feedback and discussion of issues encountered in student teaching as well as new materials and techniques of student teaching will be included. Application and approval are required. Open only to DePaul students. (12 credit hours)

ECE 387 | CAPSTONE SEMINAR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to help candidates integrate the central emphases of their Liberal Studies curriculum with their professional knowledge and behavior. It provides opportunities and activities to prospective educators that engage them in being analytic and reflective upon their major and related disciplines; guide them in further considering their value commitments and how they relate to their chosen profession; apply critical and creative thinking in addressing 'real-time' professional issues and needs; and examine extant practices from multicultural perspectives. Candidates develop a professional teaching portfolio that reflects the standards of the various guiding professional organizations and the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator as well as the goals of the Liberal Studies program. The course is taken simultaneously with student teaching. COREQUISITE(S): ECE 385. (2 credit hours)

ECE 390 | DEVELOPMENTAL THERAPY STRATEGIES FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS IN EARLY INTERVENTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills needed to work effectively with young children from birth through age 3, who have disabilities and special learning needs. The course will use child-centered, play-based interventions and developmentally appropriate practice as the central approach. Furthermore, students will examine learning outcomes and related intervention (lessons), which will be used to effectively address these outcomes, as well as aligning ongoing assessment of the intervention strategies. Students will examine issues related to the impact that disability conditions have on young children's learning needs in all developmental domains. Additionally, students will explore issues related to intervention of young children within the context of families and caregivers - that is within natural and inclusive settings, such as the family's home, community settings, or center-based programs.

ECE 290, ECE 309 and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

ECE 391 | ASSESSMENT OF INFANT AND TODDLERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Built on a partnership with families, this course focuses attention on all aspects of development including social/emotional, cognitive, sensory/motor and communication. Beginning with observation and naturalistic assessment processes, teachers examine the principles of best practice for assessing babies and toddlers for service in infant/toddler care, Early Head Start and early intervention. Teacher candidates learn to administer screening tools, criterion referenced instruments and leading standardized instruments and procedures, including the transdisciplinary approach and the Hawaii Early Learning Profile.

ECE 290, ECE 309 and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

ECE 392 | WORKING WITH FAMILIES OF INFANTS AND TODDLERS: PARTNERSHIP AND COLLABORATION IN EARLY INTERVENTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills needed to work effectively with families of young children from birth through age 3, who have disabilities and special learning needs. The course will examine philosophical foundations and collaboration strategies for teachers and other professionals working with families of young children with exceptionalities in Early Intervention programs and inclusive settings where the infants and toddlers may be served.

ECE 306 and an Education major or minor are prerequisites.

ECE 393 | INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCES WITH INFANTS, TODDLERS AND TWOS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a supervised internship, in which the candidates will practice early intervention strategies in a field experience of 40 clock hours with infants and toddlers with special needs. In this internship candidates will practice 1) assessment of infants and toddlers, 2) developmental therapy and play strategies with infants and toddlers, and 3) collaboration working in partnership with family members of children with special needs. Co-requisite: ECE 390; ECE 391; ECE 392. (2 credit hours)

ECE 395 | DESIGNING CURRICULUM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Research in neuroscience indicates that the brain developmental foundation for all later learning is created in the first three years of life. The impact and impetus for the adults (families and caregivers) who nurture and teach children from birth to three will be explored in this course. The course will examine the developmental milestones, as well, as each child?s developmental profile to create a developmentally appropriate curriculum to enhance the ?foundation for all later learning?. The course explores ways to provide a safe and challenging environment; to focus on play as a vehicle for learning for optimal developmental outcomes. Collaboration with families in addressing each child?s development is featured in the course. Candidates will be expected to design curricula to meet the needs of linguistically and culturally diverse children, as well as young children with special needs.

ECE 398 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course offers intensive study of selected topics in the field of early childhood education and care. Course content and credits vary according to topic. Syllabus is tailored to the topic of special study. Example topics include: Implementing common core in kindergarten; Social-emotional learning programming in K-3; Using data to make curricular decisions in PK-3; Mentoring families who are teen-agers.

ECE 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(1-4 Credits) PREREQUISITE(S): Permission from instructor, program chair and associate dean.

ECE 490 | DEVELOPMENTAL THERAPY STRATEGIES FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS IN EARLY INTERVENTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills needed to work effectively with young children from birth through age 3, who have disabilities and special learning needs. The course will use child-centered, play-based interventions and developmentally appropriate practice as the central approach. Furthermore, students will examine learning outcomes and related intervention (lessons), which will be used to effectively address these outcomes, as well as aligning ongoing assessment of the intervention strategies. Students will examine issues related to the impact that disability conditions have on young children's learning needs in all developmental domains. Additionally, students will explore issues related to intervention of young children within the context of families and caregivers that is within natural and inclusive settings, such as the family's home, community settings, or center-based programs.

SCG 404 and T&L 427 (or equivalent) are prerequisites for this class.

ECE 491 | ASSESSMENT OF INFANT AND TODDLERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Built on a partnership with families, this course focuses attention on all aspects of development including social/emotional, cognitive, sensory/motor and communication. Beginning with observation and naturalistic assessment processes, teachers examine the principles of best practice for assessing babies and toddlers for service in infant/toddler care, Early Head Start and early intervention. Teacher candidates learn to administer screening tools, criterion referenced instruments and leading standardized instruments and procedures, including the transdisciplinary approach and the Hawaii Early Learning Profile.

SCG 404 and T&L 427 (or equivalent) are prerequisites for this class.

ECE 492 | WORKING WITH FAMILIES OF INFANTS AND TODDLERS: PARTNERSHIP AND COLLABORATION IN EARLY INTERVENTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills needed to work effectively with families of young children from birth through age 3, who have disabilities and special learning needs. The course will examine philosophical foundations and collaboration strategies for teachers and other professionals working with families of young children with exceptionalities in Early Intervention programs and inclusive settings where the infants and toddlers may be served.

T&L 421 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 493 | INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCES WITH INFANTS, TODDLERS AND TWOS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a supervised internship, in which the candidates will practice early intervention strategies in a field experience of 40 clock hours with infants and toddlers with special needs. In this internship candidates will practice 1) assessment of infants and toddlers, 2) developmental therapy and play strategies with infants and toddlers, and 3) collaboration working in partnership with family members of children with special needs. Co-requisite: ECE 490; ECE 491; ECE 492. (2 credit hours)

ECE 704 | SEMINAR IN RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The focus of the seminar is to introduce the doctoral students to major research questions and issues in child development. The doctoral students will lead discussions on the most current and seminal research in the field of child development. In addition, the students will participate in analyses of existing US Policies in regards to child development. The seminar will have the following objectives: 1) Examination, analysis, and evaluation of the seminal and contemporary research and research methodologies in child development. 2) Examination and analysis of major theories of child development through a study of the original literature. 3) Examination and analysis of contemporary issues regarding maternal health and early development. 4) Examination, analysis, and evaluation of US policy approaches to maternal health and early child development and education.

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 706 | CANDIDACY PAPER | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing a dissertation. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. This registration indicates that a student has successfully completed the candidacy paper as specified in the Doctoral Student Handbook. (0 credit hours).

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 714 | SEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENT, RISK, AND RESILIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar will examine the concept of risk and its influence on child development within various frameworks such as environment, genetics and neurobiology, psychopathology, family, public policy and education. An issue of interest will be the development of children who are at-risk due to environmental factors. The U.S. policies in addressing this population will be examined. The seminar will have the following objectives: 1) In-depth analysis of the concepts of risk and resilience through examination of the original research literature. 2) Examination and analysis of various risk factors (e.g.: genetics, biology, poverty, family, socio political influences) with attention given to neurobiological risk factors, including disabilities. 3) Examination and analysis of factors of resilience (including implications for intervention and early childhood education). 4) Examination and analysis of U.S. Policies in relationship to promotion of resilience via early childhood intervention and education programs.

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 724 | SEMINAR IN CURRICULAR APPROACHES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar will examine issues related to curriculum in early childhood education and intervention, including assessment and other contemporary schooling issues. An in-depth analysis of various theoretical approaches influencing curriculum design in early childhood and family intervention will be conducted, as well as a review of the most influential and current educational models guiding curriculum in current early childhood settings. Through participation in this seminar candidates will meet the following objectives: 1) Examination of theoretical approaches influencing early childhood curriculum design. 2) Examination and analysis of contemporary curricular and assessment issues in early childhood education. 3) Examination and analysis of current early childhood educational models guiding curriculum. 4) Observation and analysis of model early childhood programs. 5) Exploration of other relevant contemporary early childhood education issues.

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 734 | SEMINAR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM DESIGN AND EVALUATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Doctoral students will examine the design and goals of various nationally funded early childhood programs from their philosophical and policy perspectives. Doctoral students will devote the major part of this seminar to conducting a research evaluation of one selected national early childhood program as a class team project. The research may require utilizing field research methodologies of one or more centers belonging to the selected program. When feasible the students will present their research findings in a local or national conference. The seminar will have the following objectives: 1) Understanding program design. 2) Developing program evaluation to match questions and address stakeholder needs. 3) Acquiring hands-on experience conducting a program evaluation on a selected early childhood program. 4) Written and oral dissemination of study.

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 744 | SEMINAR IN CULTURE, LANGUAGE AND LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar will focus on examining the influences of culture and language in development and education of children. Current cross-cultural, cross-lingual educational research will be examined in detail. The seminar will have the following objectives: 1) In-depth examination and analysis of influences of race and culture on development based on current research. 2) Examination and analysis of multicultural issues, and implications for early education method and practices. 3) Examination and analysis of issues related to the education of interracial children. 4) Examination of bilingual issues and implications for early education methods and practices. 5) Examination and evaluation of current educational policies in relationship to bilingual and bicultural children in the US.

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 759 | TEACHING INTERNSHIP IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This teaching internship is designed to respond to the growing need for preparing high quality teaching professionals in the field. Early Childhood Education Doctoral students acquire hands-on experience in college-level teaching in early childhood education or related fields. The doctoral student will teach one course under the supervision of an early childhood program faculty member. The course to be taught is recommended by the supervising faculty advisor based on the doctoral student's background and career goals. The major objectives of this internship are: 1) Demonstrating mastery of course content. 2) Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching college and university level students and pre-service early childhood professionals from diverse backgrounds.

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 769 | RESEARCH INTERNSHIP IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This research internship is designed to provide an actual research experience in early childhood education. With the approval of the ECE program faculty, the candidates will work either with a faculty from the College of Education, from another college at DePaul University, or with a research associate or scientist at DePaul or in another institution to assist on a research project in one of the following areas: child development, early childhood education, child and family studies, developmental psychology or another closely related field. The student's progress will be followed up by an early childhood advising faculty. The internship has the following objectives: 1) Understanding DePaul's IRB protocol and application process to acquire certification for conducting research. 2) Acquiring first-hand experience while assisting research faculty in conducting various phases of research. 3) Collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data under supervision. 4) Understanding various research methodologies employed in the field of early childhood education.

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ECE 849 | SUPERVISED DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertation proposals. Permission of dissertation chair required.

ECE 859 | INDEPENDENT DISSERTATION RESEARCH: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertations. Permission of dissertation chair required.