Educating Adults (EA)

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EA 505 | APPLIED INQUIRY PROJECT PROPOSAL I | 0.5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Each student will design his/her EA 528 Applied Inquiry Project, in consultation with the faculty mentor and a project advisor. Proposal I emphasizes selecting a project topic/focus, identifying the primary users, and conducting a literature review. Proposal II emphasizes shaping and designing the inquiry project, and outlining the final product(s). Upon completion of both phases, the proposal must be approved by the Academic Committee and Graduate Student Program Review Committee (GSPRC). (.5 quarter hour)

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 506 | APPLIED INQUIRY PROJECT PROPOSAL II | 0.5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Each student will design his/her EA 528 Applied Inquiry Project, in consultation with the faculty mentor and a project advisor. Proposal I emphasizes selecting a project topic/focus, identifying the primary users, and conducting a literature review. Proposal II emphasizes shaping and designing the inquiry project, and outlining the final product(s). Upon completion of both phases, the proposal must be approved by the Academic Committee and Graduate Student Program Review Committee (GSPRC). (.5 quarter hours)

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 507 | APPLIED INQUIRY PROJECT PROPOSAL I | 1 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Each student will design his/her EA 528 Applied Inquiry Project, in consultation with the faculty mentor and a project advisor. Proposal I emphasizes selecting a project topic/focus, identifying the primary users, and conducting a literature review. Proposal II emphasizes shaping and designing the inquiry project, and outlining the final product(s). Upon completion of both phases, the proposal must be approved by the Academic Committee and Graduate Student Program Review Committee (GSPRC). (1 quarter hour)

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 508 | APPLIED INQUIRY PROJECT PROPOSAL II | 1 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Each student will design his/her EA 528 Applied Inquiry Project, in consultation with the faculty mentor and a project advisor. Proposal I emphasizes selecting a project topic/focus, identifying the primary users, and conducting a literature review. Proposal II emphasizes shaping and designing the inquiry project, and outlining the final product(s). Upon completion of both phases, the proposal must be approved by the Academic Committee and Graduate Student Program Review Committee (GSPRC). (1 quarter hour)

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 515 | DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this foundation course, students will situate their own area of practice in broader contexts of adult learning and adult education. Students will systematically reflect on their professional identity(ies), examine their practice in the context of philosophical traditions, and construct their ?own philosophy? of education to guide their practice. They will expand their academic sources and professional networks. Students will begin work on their individual program portfolios, which will be constructed throughout their program.

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 516 | DESIGNING EDUCATIONAL OFFERINGS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students will be introduced to major components involved in designing educational offerings for adult learners in various face-to-face settings. Students will develop (or revise) a design plan for an educational offering appropriate to their selected adult clientele. In particular, they will articulate learning outcomes around which to build their design plan (backward design). They will apply theories, concepts, and principles of adult learning while making design decisions. While the design principles addressed in this course are relevant to on-line environments, students who wish to delve further into on-line learning/teaching technology are encouraged to do so through the MAEA Electives option.

EA 517 | FACILITATING ADULT LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students will develop and hone skills to facilitate adult learning in a variety of settings. Students will learn about concepts that inform learner-centered methods and techniques of facilitating learning. Throughout the course, they will apply various methods and techniques in various settings and reflect on how these methods influence learning. The repertoire of skills that students develop as facilitators of learning will have both immediate and future application. While the concepts, methods, and techniques covered in this course are relevant to on-line learning, students who wish to delve further into facilitating on-line learning are encouraged to do so through the MAEA Electives option.

EA 518 | ENHANCING PRACTICE WITH THEORY IN ADULT LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this capstone course, students? practices in helping adults learn will be grounded in relevant theories, models, and principles of adult learning and development. Students will examine various strands of research and theory that support, challenge, and enhance their practices in working with adult learners in their selected settings. Students will have many opportunities to explore and share new ideas and approaches through the various perspectives studied, thereby enhancing one another?s theoretical foundations.

EA 525 | CONDUCTING PRACTICE-BASED INQUIRY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students will be introduced to methods, strategies, and techniques appropriate for qualitative research designs. Students will select a topic of inquiry (research topic) relevant to their individual practice setting. The history and philosophy of qualitative research in the social sciences will be briefly explored to provide the framework for designing a research plan appropriate to their selected inquiry topic. Students will investigate various literature related to their topic of inquiry, research designs, data collection and analysis strategies, and research reporting formats. In this way, EA 525 becomes a springboard for independent learning projects, including the Applied Inquiry Project (AIP). Students who wish to augment qualitative research with quantitative approaches are encouraged to do so through the MAEA Electives option.

EA 526 | ASSESSING ADULT LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students will learn about and apply various approaches for assessing learning outcomes of individuals in ways that also contribute to the learning process. The assessment of adult leaning entails examining the actual outcomes of learning activities in relation to intended outcomes in order to make determinations about, and continually improve, both student learning and facilitator instructional practices. Students will address these components as they develop an assessment plan relevant to their practice setting and gain skill in designing assessment instruments.

EA 528 | APPLIED INQUIRY PROJECT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In consultation with the faculty mentor and a project guide, each student will design and carry out a project that addresses a significant question/issue in the student?s area of practice, with the aim of enhancing practice informed by relevant frameworks and ideas. The final product must be approved by GSPRC.

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 535 | REFLECTIVE PRACTICE SEMINAR I | 0.5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is a faculty mentor-guided session, which follows EA 515. Students revisit their selected area of practice, select purposes for their program portfolio, and plan for development of the Elements of Reflective Practice.

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 536 | REFLECTIVE PRACTICE SEMINAR II | 0.5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students meet with their faculty mentor for group reflection and review of their progress in the program. This seminar assists students in planning their electives, reflecting on applications of their learning and assessing growth in the Elements of Reflective Practice, mapping theories and concepts to their practice settings, and sharing approaches to their program portfolios.

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 537 | REFLECTIVE PRACTICE SEMINAR III | 0.5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Meeting with their faculty mentor, this seminar offers students an opportunity to get feedback on plans for the Applied Inquiry Project, conduct an informal mid-program review, examine ways in which students are applying the three Elements of Reflective Practice, identify significant ?threads? across the curriculum, and present on aspects of their program portfolios.

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 538 | REFLECTIVE PRACTICE SEMINAR IV | 0.5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Near the end of the program, students join their faculty mentors in a summit to review their program, engage in discussion on their next steps, review their credo of educating adults, reflect again on the three Elements of Reflective Practice, and present their program portfolio.

Status as an MAEA student or departmental permission is a prerequisite for this class.

EA 540 | DESIGNING AND DELIVERING TECHNOLOGY-ENHANCED LEARNING OFFERINGS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on designing and delivering educational experiences using the web, digital video, animation, gaming and mobile delivery formats. Students explore instructional design theory and bridge its application into/through basic training in each of these technological applications, including consideration of relevant examples of best practices and instructions regarding when to employ each application. This course does not have prerequisites; however, students are expected to be familiar with basic learning design principles.

EA 541 | TEACHING WITH WRITING IN ANY COURSE | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This online course (six-modules) for teachers in any discipline focuses on making the most of writing as a tool for teaching and learning in undergraduate and graduate courses. In the course, teachers will explore practical ideas for in-class writing assignments that initiate discussions and provide quick input regarding student learning. Teachers will also learn strategies for developing assignments and providing feedback while maximizing efficiency and minimizing frustration. Opportunities to share ideas and receive coaching on current writing assignments and ways of giving feedback are included. This course does not have prerequisites; however, those taking it should have undergraduate or graduate courses that they wish to develop or revise and experience teaching at the college level that they can draw upon for discussions. (2 quarter hours)

EA 542 | DESIGNING OUTCOME-BASED PROGRAM EVALUATION: PERSPECTIVES & PRACTICES | 2-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course functions as a Graduate Faculty-Directed Independent Study/GFDIS. (See MAEA Guidebook for general GFDIS details.) Each student designs a plan for outcome-based program evaluation, along with evaluation tools, that are relevant to his/her practice setting. This evaluation approach is then considered in relation to other models and approaches to evaluation of education, training and professional development programs. Illustrations of current program evaluation practices are included (2 quarter hours)

EA 543 | INNOVATIVE FACILITATING GFDIS | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course functions as a Graduate Faculty-Directed Independent Study/GFDIS. (See MAEA Guidebook for general GFDIS details.) Students participate in SNL's Adult Learning Innovation Institute (Module: Innovative Strategies for Facilitating Adult Learning), learn innovative strategies for engaging and motivating adult learners in various educational and training settings and subsequently apply their learning in specific ways within their practice settings. Students also receive feedback and coaching from instructors and institute peers. (Questions? For information regarding the Institute, contact caea@depaul.edu . For information regarding the GFDIS-course, contact its instructors.) (2 quarter hours)

EA 544 | BUILDING GAMES FOR LEARNING GFDIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course functions as a Graduate Faculty-Directed Independent Study/GFDIS. (See MAEA Guidebook for general GFDIS details.) Technology advances make it possible to enhance social learning (interpersonal) in cost-efficient ways by creating simulations and other forms of virtual delivery. This course focuses on ways to apply game concepts and game techniques, supported by foundational theories, that can be applied in various settings, e.g., corporate, higher education, community-based. Using simulation software (Articulate Storyline provided by the instructor), students will produce interactive serious games for virtual delivery for their targeted audience. Students are expected to be proficient in use of Microsoft Work and Power Point and have a computer with Internet access.

EA 545 | PARTNERING FOR SOCIAL ACTION GFDIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course functions as a Graduate-Faculty-Directed Independent Study/GFDIS. (See MAEA Guidebook for general GFDIS details.) This course provides opportunities for students to engage in community settings throughout Chicago. Students will learn how to: observe social agency in action; build relationships across class, race and other barriers to mutual understanding; and, actively participate in service opportunities with organizations addressing social justice concerns. In addition to hands-on engagement in the field, students will explore theories and principles related to community empowerment work in community settings. Students must contact the instructor prior to registering for this GFDIS to obtain information about available community settings/projects and time/schedule/location expectations. Onsite community project work and meeting schedule (max five) will be determined based on the selected project work.

EA 546 | EDUCATING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE GFDIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course functions as a Graduate-Faculty-Directed Independent Study/GFDIS. (See MAEA Guidebook for general GFDIS details.) Students critically examine and apply diverse ways of defining, analyzing and engaging in social justice education, as both educators and learners. Key dimensions of social justice approaches to education of adults (culture, ethics and politics; facilitation; curriculum development; and, educator as change-agent) will be addressed. In addition to critical reflection on assigned readings, students will observe social justice education in a community context (arranged by the instructor) and will apply social justice principles to an educational offering in their own practice sites.

EA 547 | DESIGNING ONLINE LEARNING GFDIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course functions as a Graduate Faculty-Directed Independent Study/GFDIS. (See MAEA Guidebook for general GFDIS details.) Course addresses the process of designing effective, learner-centered online offerings such as webinars, workshops, or modules for use in formal education or training settings. Using adult learning principles, best practices, and backward planning, learning outcomes, content, and assessments are developed and delivered in a virtual environment. Formal and informal learning communities are explored using social media for learner engagement and interaction. The instructor incorporates interactive lectures and group discussions. Assessment criteria and rubrics guide feedback for ongoing learning as well as for final evaluation of performance. Students will have an opportunity to design an offering specifically applicable to their needs and interests with regard to helping adults learn.