Bilingual-Bicultural Education (BBE)

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BBE 96 | 100 FIELD EXPERIENCE HOURS IN ESL / BE DOCUMENTED | 0 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Required of all Bilingual Bicultural students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. The observation hours are a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses. (0 credit hours)

BBE 97 | 100 FIELD EXPERIENCE HOURS IN ESL / BE DOCUMENTED | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Required of all Bilingual Bicultural students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. The observation hours are a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses. (0 credit hours)

BBE 300 | TEACHING ELEMENTARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS: THEORY, POLICY AND PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This introductory course offers candidates a foundation in the critical elements in the education of English Language Learners (ELL) in the Elementary grades: second language acquisition, consequences of additive and subtractive bilingualism, culture and diversity, policies and law, ELL family involvement, language development standards, advocacy, and assessment. The course analyzes factors that influence the acquisition of the first and second language. Emphasis is given to the linguistic process in an individual's acquisition of two languages and the context in which both languages are developed alongside academic attainment. Multicultural perspectives and approaches are examined in relation to culturally and linguistically diverse students' backgrounds and experiences. Teaching practices, curriculum development, appropriate instructional materials and assessments are examined. Family/community relations and partnerships, as well engagement of advocacy are also explored. Current federal and state policies related to ELLs are addressed. This course covers the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards related to addressing the academic, linguistic, and socio-emotional needs of ELLs.

BBE 301 | TEACHING ADOLESCENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS AND DIALECT SPEAKERS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides educators across disciplinary content areas foundational knowledge for teaching and assessing adolescent English language learners (ELLs) and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English. Especial focus is placed on identifying and augmenting students' various (oral and written) proficiencies and inter- and intra-linguistic varieties of English toward increased academic English proficiency. This course also engages educators in realizing in curriculum and instruction the multifaceted aspects of fostering academic proficiency among adolescent ELLs and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English, such as theories of first, second, and heritage language sociolinguistics; language policy and planning; cross-disciplinary collaboration; parental/family language practices; family and community participation and involvement; informed decision making and advocacy; school/community discourses; learner accommodations; WIDA and Common Core standards; and culturally and linguistically appropriate assessment.

SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

BBE 302 | BILINGUAL-BICULTURAL PROGRAM DESIGN AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Reviews theory and application of curriculum development to bilingual instructional programs, such as design, organizational patterns, materials and media, teacher training, parent and community involvement, and evaluation. Principal bilingual education program models are examined and analyzed. Includes a review of multiethnic literature and literacy that advocates for students' self-concept, acceptance, and sense of identity (includes 15 clinical hour requirement).

BBE 304 | LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the linguistic, cultural, and social contexts in which culturally and linguistically diverse communities operate and their relation to educational practices. The class addresses sociolinguistic and multicultural perspectives on language and cultural diversity within and outside the U.S. Case studies examined in class readings provide the conceptual framework for multicultural education in the context of language and literacy development. This course is designed to assist future and current teachers in attaining an expanded understanding on the linguistic, cultural, and sociocultural theoretical frameworks that are at the core of educational transformation and social justice in the US. The course also aims to examine educators? roles in creating culturally and linguistically responsive curricula for diverse students. Topics include language and ethnicity, language and identity, language and social class, literacy practices, language standardization, language discrimination, dialects, language loss, and heritage languages. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 305 | THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS IN BILINGUAL EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to equip bilingual childhood teachers with the knowledge and philosophy to work effectively in the education of early childhood language minority students in the context of bilingual/ESL programs. The course will explore the historical, socio-political and legal foundations of bilingual education programs in the United States. It will examine different models of language education programs: immersion, ESL pullout, transitional bilingual education, maintenance bilingual, enrichment or dual language. It will also address psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic principles upon which they are based.

BBE 306 | FOUNDATIONS OF ENGLISH AS SECOND LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Candidates explore English as a Second Language (ESL), theory and practice as it applies to young children and their families. Candidates also study the sociocultural, pedagogical, linguistic, and political issues underlying current models of education for non-English speaking children, as well as models for ESL instruction in early childhood settings. Critical emphasis is placed upon theories that support young learners in second language acquisition.

BBE 307 | EQUITY ISSUES IN ASSESSMENT OF LANGUAGE LEARNERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines assessment procedures, including standardized and performance-based, as well as ethical standards and practices used in the assessment of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Equity and legal issues related to assessment practices, research, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, cultural and sociopolitical issues related to assessment are discussed. Emphasizes existing biases in assessment and non-discriminatory assessment practices and policies. National, state, and local assessment policies are examined. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 310 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN LANGUAGE EDUCATION AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to explore a specific area of study in the field of linguistics, such as sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, applied linguistics, language planning and policy, and cognitive bilingualism, among other related topics. The particular focus of study will vary and change as the course is offered. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 311 | FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This introductory course offers candidates a foundation in the critical elements in the education of ELLs: second language acquisition, consequences of additive and subtractive bilingualism, culture and diversity, policies and law, ELL family involvement, language development standards, advocacy, and assessment. The course analyzes factors that influence the acquisition of the first and second language. Teaching practices, curriculum development, selection of instructional materials, use of appropriate language and content assessments are examined. This course covers the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards related to addressing the academic, linguistic, and socio-emotional needs of ELLs.

BBE 316 | SOCIOCULTURAL AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN BILINGUAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Presents theoretical constructs of bilingual schooling in the U.S. and other multilingual societies from historical, theoretical and sociocultural perspectives. Emphasizes issues in bilingual education related to the sociocultural and legal aspects of language policy and bilingual education in the U.S. The historical trajectory of language policy and bilingual education in the U.S. is discussed in reference to Native American languages and early European settlers' language schooling practices. The focus shifts to 20th and 21st century bilingual education and immigration policies that have influenced both the advocacy for and opposition to bilingual education as well as the movement to make English the official language in the U.S.

BBE 320 | ANALYZING RESEARCH ON IDENTITY, CULTURE & LANGUAGE EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduces students to, and engages them in reading, research design within the context of bilingual-bicultural education and second language learning and instruction. Students will consider important linguistic and sociocultural issues in language education as examined with various research methods, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods. Students will conduct and present a mini-action research project about their own learning and development, and will write a cogent review of literature about a personally meaningful topic, problem, or issue related to language and culture education. (Includes 15 clinical hour requirement.)

BBE 310 and at least 4 BBE courses (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this class.

BBE 324 | METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces instructional methods, approaches, strategies and materials for teaching English language learners. Particular importance is placed on the relationship of reading and writing development to second language acquisition, teaching language and content, and fostering cognitive development through the four domains of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 325 | BILITERACY PRACTICES IN BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND ESL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analyzes and evaluates methods and materials used in bilingual education and ESL programs. Stresses effective instructional strategies and best practices in first and second language literacy development and content learning. Reviews language teaching approaches and cooperative models of learning relating to development of reading and writing in the first and second language. Presents the acquiring language through content learning versus learning language programs. Investigates appropriate first language usage in bilingual classrooms, focusing on the different content areas, appropriate terminology for native language instruction, and the study of language distribution issues (includes 15 clinical hour requirement).

BBE 326 | THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING ESL AND WLE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces key foundational theories of English as a second language and world language education that form the basis of our development as language education practitioners and professionals. The course explores theories of language, theories of learning and learners, and theory-driven teaching, as well as the philosophical paradigms that inform them. Foundational theories are introduced as problem-solving tools that provide interdisciplinary perspectives of English as a second language and world language education, and as frameworks for critically reading literature on language education theory, research, and methods.

BBE 330 | LATINOS AND EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines historical and current issues related to the education of Latinos in the US that includes PK-12 and higher education. The course explores the sociolinguistic, theoretical, historical, sociocultural, legal, and political contexts that shape the educational experience of Latinos in the US. Demographic trends and data are examined in light of the various characteristics that make up the diverse Latino population. The course also analyses the theoretical, historical, and political constructs of bilingual schooling and the underlying assumptions and implications for Latino students. Current research conducted by prominent scholars in the field are presented and examined. The course considers factors that influence, positively or negatively, the educational attainment of Latino students. The readings and class discussions emphasize how power relations in the wider society influence patterns in Latino education outcomes and policy-making. The course also examines arguments, assumptions, and interpretations of current and past legislation in regards to the education of Latinos in the US.

BBE 350 | ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS IN THE MIDDLE GRADES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Presents an introduction to the field of English as a second language, with attention to fundamental concepts of second language acquisition in various language learning contexts. The course analyzes possible factors that influence the acquisition of the first and second language, including linguistic, cognitive, social, and affective dimensions. Emphasis is given not only to the linguistic process in individuals? acquisition of two languages, but also the social, cultural, political, and educational context in which both languages are developed alongside academic attainment. Discusses interdisciplinary perspectives of second language acquisition and their application to classroom practices. This introductory course is designed for mainstream educators and covers the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards related to addressing the academic, linguistic, and socio-emotional needs of ELLs. ***This course counts toward ESL endorsement. Co-requisites for this course are MGE 301 and MGE 311. In this course, students will: 1.

MGE 300 and Junior standing are prerequisites for this class.

BBE 355 | HOW ENGLISH WORKS: ENGLISH SYNTAX FOR ESL AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION TEACHERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the structure of English from a descriptive linguistic framework. It addresses the inner workings of the English language through objective investigation of the lexical, phrasal, and clausal structures of the language to provide ESL and bilingual education teachers the syntactic foundation of the language they will teach. Topics include parts of speech, constituency, phrase structure, clause types, complements versus adjuncts, question formation, tense, negation, and the grammar of dialects. Additionally, this course will provide special emphasis on how these areas of English grammar interface with Common Core and WIDA standards for ELLs.

BBE 360 | SECOND, WORLD AND HERITAGE LANGUAGE ACQUISITION K-12 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to the theoretical study of second, world and heritage language acquisition (SLA) from a generative and psycholinguistic perspective at the K-12 levels. The content of the class is founded on the major concepts and issues of language acquisition, including UG-access, L1-transfer, age effects, and the acquisition of form vs. meaning. The course pays particular attention to empirical second and world language studies at the syntax/semantics interface. Course readings and discussion examine the complexities of the processes involved in acquiring a world language that includes the relation between first and SLA; contrastive and error analysis; interlanguage; the social and cultural influences on SLA; learner variability; learning strategies; and classroom interaction analysis. Issues surrounding second and world language acquisition are discussed and deliberated through university classroom experiences as well as required field experiences. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 366 | FIRST AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines principles, processes, theories, and research in first and second language acquisition and bilingualism with implications for language teaching. The course provides an introduction to the fields of first and second language acquisition (SLA) that include universal, individual, and social features and dimensions of the second language learning process that determine the nature and path of acquisition. These features include age and critical periods; cross-linguistic influences; role of the environment; cognitive contributions; interlanguage variability; linguistic features; motivation; and affect. Socio-cultural and sociopolitical aspects of second language acquisition and bilingualism are also discussed. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 370 | SECOND & WORLD LANGUAGE LITERACIES AND CULTURES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the interdisciplinary study of first, second and world languages and multiple L1 and L2 literacies in their cultural, social, and political contexts, with emphasis on issues of ethnicity, identity, social class, gender, power, and other related topics relative to ideologies of reading and writing the world through reading and writing the word. Especial focus is placed on these topics as they pertain to the extant research on language, literacy, and culture represented in the WLE certification language communities, as well as in the literature, art, music, and popular culture of those communities as a means of advocating students' sense of identity as global citizens. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 400 | TEACHING ELEMENTARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS: THEORY, POLICY AND PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This introductory course offers candidates a foundation in the critical elements in the education of English Language Learners (ELL) in the Elementary grades: second language acquisition, consequences of additive and subtractive bilingualism, culture and diversity, policies and law, ELL family involvement, language development standards, advocacy, and assessment. The course analyzes factors that influence the acquisition of the first and second language. Emphasis is given to the linguistic process in an individual's acquisition of two languages and the context in which both languages are developed alongside academic attainment. Multicultural perspectives and approaches are examined in relation to culturally and linguistically diverse students' backgrounds and experiences. Teaching practices, curriculum development, appropriate instructional materials and assessments are examined. Family/community relations and partnerships, as well engagement of advocacy are also explored. Current federal and state policies related to ELLs are addressed. This course covers the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards related to addressing the academic, linguistic, and socio-emotional needs of ELLs.

BBE 402 | BILINGUAL-BICULTURAL PROGRAM DESIGN AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Reviews theory and application of curriculum development to bilingual instructional programs, such as design, organizational patterns, materials and media, teacher training, parent and community involvement, and evaluation. Principal bilingual education program models are examined and analyzed. Includes a review of multiethnic literature and literacy that advocates for students' self-concept, acceptance, and sense of identity. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 404 | LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the linguistic, cultural, and social contexts in which culturally and linguistically diverse communities operate and their relation to educational practices. The class addresses sociolinguistic and multicultural perspectives on language and cultural diversity within and outside the U.S. Case studies examined in class readings provide the conceptual framework for multicultural education in the context of language and literacy development. This course is designed to assist future and current teachers in attaining an expanded understanding on the linguistic, cultural, and sociocultural theoretical frameworks that are at the core of educational transformation and social justice in the US. The course also aims to examine educators? roles in creating culturally and linguistically responsive curricula for diverse students. Topics include language and ethnicity, language and identity, language and social class, literacy practices, language standardization, language discrimination, dialects, language loss, and heritage languages. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 406 | SOCIOCULTURAL AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN BILINGUAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Presents theoretical constructs of bilingual schooling in the U.S. and other multilingual societies from historical, theoretical and sociocultural perspectives. Emphasizes issues in bilingual education related to the sociocultural and legal aspects of language policy and bilingual education in the U.S. The historical trajectory of language policy and bilingual education in the U.S. is discussed in reference to Native American languages and early European settlers' language schooling practices. The focus shifts to 20th and 21st century bilingual education and immigration policies that have influenced both the advocacy for and opposition to bilingual education as well as the movement to make English the official language in the U.S.

BBE 407 | EQUITY ISSUES IN ASSESSMENT OF LANGUAGE LEARNERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Examines assessment procedures, including standardized and performance-based, as well as ethical standards and practices used in the assessment of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Equity and legal issues related to assessment practices, research, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and cultural and sociopolitical issues related to assessment are discussed. Emphasizes existing biases in assessment and non-discriminatory assessment practices and policies. National, state, and local assessment policies are examined. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 408 | BILINGUAL EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to equip bilingual and second language teachers with the knowledge and philosophy to work effectively in the education of early childhood language minority students in the context of bilingual/ESL programs. The course will explore the historical, political and legal foundations of bilingual education programs in the United States. It will examine different models of bilingual programs and the psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic principles upon which they are based.

BBE 409 | ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE INSTRUCTIONAL FOUNDATIONS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTINGS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Candidates explore English as a Second Language (ESL), theory, and practice as it applies to young children and their families. Candidates also study the socio-cultural, pedagogical, linguistic, and political issues underlying current models of education for non-English speaking children, as well as models for ESL instruction in early childhood settings. Critical emphasis is placed upon theories that support young learners in second language acquisition.

BBE 411 | FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This introductory course offers candidates a foundation in the critical elements in the education of English Language Learners (ELL): second language acquisition, consequences of additive and subtractive bilingualism, culture and diversity, policies and law, ELL family involvement, language development standards, advocacy, and assessment. The course analyzes factors that influence the acquisition of the first and second language. Emphasis is given to the linguistic process in an individual's acquisition of two languages and the context in which both languages are developed alongside academic attainment. Multicultural perspectives and approaches are examined in relation to culturally and linguistically diverse students' backgrounds and experiences. Teaching practices, curriculum development, selection of instructional materials, use of appropriate language and content assessments are examined. Family/community relations and partnerships, as well engagement of advocacy are also explored. Current federal and state policies related to ELLs are also addressed. This course covers the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards related to addressing the academic, linguistic, and socio-emotional needs of ELLs.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

BBE 425 | BILITERACY PRACTICES IN BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND ESL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Analyzes and evaluates methods and materials used in bilingual education and ESL programs. Stresses effective instructional strategies and best practices in first and second language literacy development and content learning. Reviews language teaching approaches and cooperative models of learning relating to development of reading and writing in the first and second language. Presents the acquiring language through content learning versus learning language programs. Investigates appropriate first language usage in bilingual classrooms, focusing on the different content areas, appropriate terminology for native language instruction, and the study of language distribution issues. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 450 | ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS IN THE MIDDLE GRADES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Presents an introduction to the field of English as a second language, with attention to fundamental concepts of second language acquisition in various language learning contexts. The course analyzes possible factors that influence the acquisition of the first and second language, including linguistic, cognitive, social, and affective dimensions. Emphasis is given not only to the linguistic process in individuals' acquisition of two languages, but also the social, cultural, political, and educational context in which both languages are developed alongside academic attainment. Discusses interdisciplinary perspectives of second language acquisition and their application to classroom practices. This introductory course is designed for mainstream educators and covers the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards related to addressing the academic, linguistic, and socio-emotional needs of ELLs. ***This course counts toward ESL endorsement. Co-requisites for this course are MGE 401 and MGE 411. In this course, students will: 1.

MGE 400 is a prerequisite for this class.

BBE 451 | TEACHING DUAL LANGUAGE LEARNERS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD: THEORY, POLICY AND PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This introductory course is designed for early childhood educators and leaders, and covers the academic, linguistic, and socio-emotional needs of young dual language learners (English Learners). This course builds the foundation for the effective learning and teaching of dual language learners (DLLs) in the early childhood context. The course covers: second language acquisition, culture and diversity, policies and law, family involvement, state required second language development standards, advocacy, and assessment. The course analyzes possible factors that influence the acquisition of the first and second language, including linguistic, cognitive, social, and affective dimensions. The consequences of additive and subtractive bilingualism for dual language learners? cognitive development, academic progress, linguistic processing, and metalinguistic abilities are addressed. Cross-cultural aspects are addressed in the contexts of integrating and celebrating their cultural diversity in school/center contexts. Family/community relations and partnerships, as well engagement of advocacy are also explored. Current federal and state policies related to ELLs are addressed.

BBE 466 | FIRST AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines principles, processes, theories, and research in first and second language acquisition and bilingualism with implications for language teaching. The course provides an introduction to the fields of first and second language acquisition (SLA) that include universal, individual, and social features and dimensions of the second language learning process that determine the nature and path of acquisition. These features include age and critical periods; cross-linguistic influences; role of the environment; cognitive contributions; interlanguage variability; linguistic features; motivation; and affect. Socio-cultural and sociopolitical aspects of second language acquisition and bilingualism are also discussed. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 474 | READING AND ELLS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines current theories of second language acquisition, literacy teaching and learning for English language learners (ELLs), and explores the relationships between the first and second language as it relates to the approach to teaching for transfer with ELLs. This course links theory and practice by examining pedagogical approaches that most effectively promote ELLs reading and writing development. Multicultural and multilingual characteristics of ELLs are also discussed as they relate to their literacy development. Other factors that impact the academic achievement of ELLs in relation to literacy include sociocultural, sociolinguistic, and sociopolitical dimensions of teaching ELLs. This course is designed to assist teachers with a specialization in reading to develop expanded understandings of theoretical and pedagogical perspectives related to the literacy and language processes of students learning English as a new language. In addition, literacy assessment in the first and second language represented by standardized testing as well as authentic performance-based evaluations are also presented.

BBE 476 | BILITERACY PRACTICES: SECONDARY/ADULT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Analyzes and evaluates current research and pedagogical approaches used in second language programs in relation to literacy instruction in the secondary and adult classroom settings. The course focuses on effective instructional strategies and best practices in first and second language literacy development. Special attention is given to content area learning in relation to acquiring literacy skills in a second language for secondary students. The course reviews language and literacy instructional approaches and cooperative models of learning related to the development of reading and writing in the first and second language. Discussions center on issues of acquiring language and literacy skills through content instruction as well as authentic and performance-based assessment. Investigates appropriate first and second language development in bilingual, ESL and foreign language classrooms, focusing on the different aspects of literacy and subject matter learning (includes 15 clinical hour requirement).

BBE 490 | MULTICULTURAL AND MULTILINGUAL CHILDREN'S LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will use multicultural and multilingual children's books to survey pluralism and linguistic diversity. Students will analyze folk and modern literature, including application of literary and culturally responsive criteria to these selections. Students will explore means of teaching using multicultural literature to encourage diverse learners and learning styles. Students will evaluate literature for its literary value as well as cultural acceptability. Students will read a broad variety of current multicultural literature for children and young adults. Students interested in specializing in one specific age group or grade level may focus their literature selections on literature appropriate for specific ages. Genres of children's and young adult literature will be examined and criteria for selection and renewing collections for school and public libraries will be discussed. Notable authors, poets, and illustrators of children's and young adult literature will be studied with an emphasis on those who contribute to bilingual, multilingual, and multicultural, and multiethnic collections. The use of children's and young adult literature to develop literacy, particularly for ELLs will be studied and the use of children's and young adult literature in meeting national, state, and district standards will be discussed. Children's and young adult literature will be examined from diverse perspectives in particular literature reflecting African American, Asian, Latino, and Native American cultures. However, students will read literature from all cultural groups including traditional children's and young adult literature.

BBE 501 | TEACHING ADOLESCENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS AND DIALECT SPEAKERS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides educators across disciplinary content areas foundational knowledge for teaching and assessing adolescent English language learners (ELLs) and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English. Especial focus is placed on identifying and augmenting students' various (oral and written) proficiencies and inter- and intra-linguistic varieties of English toward increased academic English proficiency. This course also engages educators in realizing in curriculum and instruction the multifaceted aspects of fostering academic proficiency among adolescent ELLs and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English, such as theories of first, second, and heritage language sociolinguistics; language policy and planning; cross-disciplinary collaboration; parental/family language practices; family and community participation and involvement; informed decision making and advocacy; school/community discourses; learner accommodations; WIDA and Common Core standards; and culturally and linguistically appropriate assessment.

T&L 425 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing or status as a TEACH student are prerequisites for this class.

BBE 510 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN LANGUAGE EDUCATION AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to explore a specific area of study in the field of linguistics, such as sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, applied linguistics, language planning and policy, and cognitive bilingualism, among other related topics. The particular focus of study will vary and change as the course is offered. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 520 | ANALYZING RESEARCH ON IDENTITY, CULTURE & LANGUAGE EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Introduces students to, and engages them in reading, research designed within the context of bilingual-bicultural education and second language learning and instruction. Students will consider important linguistic and sociocultural issues in language education as examined with various research methods, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods. Students will conduct and present a mini-action research project about their own learning and development, and will write a cogent review of literature about a personally meaningful topic, problem, or issue related to language and culture education. For many students, this paper forms the beginning stages of their BBE Masters thesis or M.Ed. paper. (Includes 15 clinical hour requirement.)

SCG 410 or SCG 610 and at least 5 BBE courses (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this class.

BBE 524 | METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces instructional methods, approaches, strategies and materials for teaching English language learners. Particular importance is placed on the relationship of reading and writing development to second language acquisition, teaching language and content, and fostering cognitive development through the four domains of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 526 | THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING ESL AND WLE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces key foundational theories of English as a second language and world language education that form the basis of our development as language education practitioners and professionals. The course explores theories of language, theories of learning and learners, and theory-driven teaching, as well as the philosophical paradigms that inform them. Foundational theories are introduced as problem-solving tools that provide interdisciplinary perspectives of English as a second language and world language education, and as frameworks for critically reading literature on language education theory, research, and methods.

BBE 530 | LATINOS AND EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines historical and current issues related to the education of Latinos in the US that includes PK-12 and higher education. The course explores the sociolinguistic, theoretical, historical, sociocultural, legal, and political contexts that shape the educational experience of Latinos in the US. Demographic trends and data are examined in light of the various characteristics that make up the diverse Latino population. The course also analyses the theoretical, historical, and political constructs of bilingual schooling and the underlying assumptions and implications for Latino students. Current research conducted by prominent scholars in the field are presented and examined. The course considers factors that influence, positively or negatively, the educational attainment of Latino students. The readings and class discussions emphasize how power relations in the wider society influence patterns in Latino education outcomes and policy-making. The course also examines arguments, assumptions, and interpretations of current and past legislation in regards to the education of Latinos in the US.

BBE 554 | METHODS OF TEACHING ESL: ELEMENTARY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course provides an in-depth study of instructional approaches and curricular designs for the second language elementary classroom setting. Presents reviews and critiques specific methods and strategies for teaching second language learners, as well as comparative methods of learning the first and second language. Emphasizes methods for implementing constructivist strategies such as cooperative learning, thematic approach, flexible grouping, and sheltered instruction. The course provides guidelines for planning effective lessons using both thematic units and content-based subject matter. A critical focus of this course is on teaching and learning ESL through the content areas for elementary students (includes 15 clinical hour requirement).

BBE 555 | HOW ENGLISH WORKS: ENGLISH SYNTAX FOR ESL AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION TEACHERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the structure of English from a descriptive linguistic framework. It addresses the inner workings of the English language through objective investigation of the lexical, phrasal, and clausal structures of the language to provide ESL and bilingual education teachers the syntactic foundation of the language they will teach. Topics include parts of speech, constituency, phrase structure, clause types, complements versus adjuncts, question formation, tense, negation, and the grammar of dialects. Additionally, this course will provide special emphasis on how these areas of English grammar interface with Common Core and WIDA standards for ELLs.

BBE 556 | METHODS OF TEACHING ESL: SECONDARY/ADULT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course explores the theoretical underpinnings and the applications of second-language theories and cultural knowledge to ESL teaching methodology and curriculum design in secondary and adult classroom settings. In addition, various approaches to second language teaching and learning as well as methods for modifying lessons to suit the needs of second-language learners to enhance their acquisition and use of English are presented. Concentrates on assisting educators in the development of appropriate strategies for teaching speaking, listening, reading, writing, and grammar in ESL environments. A major focus of this course is on teaching and learning ESL within the content areas through effective lesson planning using both thematic units and content-based subject matter. The course explores constructivist approaches such as sheltered language instruction (includes 15 clinical hour requirement).

BBE 560 | SECOND, WORLD AND HERITAGE LANGUAGE ACQUISITION K-12 | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an introduction to the theoretical study of second, world and heritage language acquisition (SLA) from a generative and psycholinguistic perspective at the K-12 levels. The content of the class is founded on the major concepts and issues of language acquisition, including UG-access, L1-transfer, age effects, and the acquisition of form vs. meaning. The course pays particular attention to empirical second and world language studies at the syntax/semantics interface. Course readings and discussion examine the complexities of the processes involved in acquiring a world language that includes the relation between first and SLA; contrastive and error analysis; interlanguage; the social and cultural influences on SLA; learner variability; learning strategies; and classroom interaction analysis. Issues surrounding second and world language acquisition are discussed and deliberated through university classroom experiences as well as required field experiences. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 570 | SECOND & WORLD LANGUAGE LITERACIES AND CULTURES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the interdisciplinary study of first, second and world languages and multiple L1 and L2 literacies in their cultural, social, and political contexts, with emphasis on issues of ethnicity, identity, social class, gender, power, and other related topics relative to ideologies of reading and writing the world through reading and writing the word. Especial focus is placed on these topics as they pertain to the extant research on language, literacy, and culture represented in the WLE certification language communities, as well as in the literature, art, music, and popular culture of those communities as a means of advocating students' sense of identity as global citizens. Includes clinical hour requirement.

BBE 588 | INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BILINGUAL BICULTURAL EDUCATION | 1-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Permission required. (1 credit hour)

BBE 589 | THESIS RESEARCH IN BILINGUAL-BICULTURAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A student writing a thesis registers for this course for four quarter hours of credit. When the thesis research and writing of the thesis are prolonged beyond the usual time, the program advisor may require the student to register for additional credit.

BBE 599 | LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATING LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course is designed for educators who currently are or will be serving in a leadership capacity involving linguistically and culturally diverse learners. The purpose of this course is to develop foundational knowledge of the theories, research, policies, and practices related to the education of English language learners. The aim is to support current and future education leaders in constructing a well-informed basis of the critical elements of ELL education that include: second language acquisition, culture and diversity, policies and law, ELL family involvement, language development standards, advocacy, and assessment. The course examines various pedagogical and assessment constructs related to teaching ELLs, including state mandated standards and assessments such as ACCESS and WIDA standards.

BBE 600 | REGISTERED STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is open to students who are not registered for any other courses but need to complete requirements/assignments for previously taken courses. It provides access to University facilities. Permission of advisor required. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

BBE 608 | CAPSTONE IN BILINGUAL-BICULTURAL EDUCATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Culminating experience(s) that help(s) students acquire the qualities of professionalism and leadership needed to play a significant role in one's professional education community. Students are expected to situate and understand educational issues in a larger context; keep current in and be able to organize and present a body of research on an education-related question; connect research with practical, professional activity; demonstrate mastery of a sub-field of a discipline; write in a format that meets accepted scholarly criteria and participate in an ongoing professional conversation. A final product such as master's paper(s), comprehensive exam, or collection of professional work products is required. (0 credit hours)

BBE 625 | CANDIDACY CULMINATING PROJECT (STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING) | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing culminating projects for their program of study, including theses, papers, and final portfolios. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. Registration limited to three terms. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

BBE 699 | LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATING CULTURALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course is designed for educators who currently are or will be serving in a leadership capacity involving linguistically and culturally diverse learners. The purpose of this course is to develop foundational knowledge of the theories, research, policies, and practices related to the education of English language learners. The aim is to support current and future education leaders in constructing a well-informed basis of the critical elements of ELL education that include: second language acquisition, culture and diversity, policies and law, ELL family involvement, language development standards, advocacy, and assessment. The course examines various pedagogical and assessment constructs related to teaching ELLs, including state mandated standards and assessments such as ACCESS and WIDA standards.

Status as an EDD student with a Global Catholic Educational Leadership concentration is a prerequisite for this class.