Journalism (JOUR)

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JOUR 245 | NEWS EDITING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to editing and publishing procedures, including proofreading, copyediting and layout for different types of publications, including newsletters, brochures, periodicals and books. Skills in grammar, punctuation, style, organization, design and headline writing are emphasized along with the editor's role in the ethics of the profession, including questions of libel. Students will understand the editor's central role in the newsroom and the flow of a story from a reporter to the public.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 275 | INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to the field of journalism. Instruction and practice in writing and reporting news stories. Students will learn the skills needed to become better communicators and to understand the news in the world around them.

JOUR 276 | PHOTOJOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to the theoretical and technical foundations of photography with exploration of the medium's aesthetic, documentary and narrative purposes. Cross-listed as ART 377.

JOUR 278 | NEWS REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to go beyond the inverted pyramid of basic news writing and focus on some of the sophisticated newsgathering techniques used by journalists. Story generation techniques will be examined along with interviewing techniques. The course will also explore how databases and documents can enhance a story, including the use of surveys, field experiments and participant observation.

JOUR 275 is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 279 | FEATURE WRITING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This practicum develops the observational and narrative skills essential to writing feature stories in a variety of journalistic contexts. Students will learn the story telling techniques that emphasize human interest, description and the details of a subject. Instruction will include illustrated lectures, class discussions, writing exercises and critiques.

JOUR 275 and 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 280 | INTRODUCTION TO ONLINE REPORTING AND PRODUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of online journalism. Students learn both conceptual and technical skills in multimedia reporting. Although the course provides groundwork in using digital tools to produce online content, the focus is on journalism. As much as possible, assignments will allow students to grasp online journalism concepts and apply them to real-world scenarios. This class uses Chicago as a testing ground for innovative reporting ideas.

JOUR 275 and 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 281 | NEWS DOCUMENTARY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students learn how to conceive, research, report, and tell news documentary video and film stories in this hands-on course that requires no formal documentary experience. *Students shouldn't take the course if they took JOUR 376 News Documentary in Fall 2017 or Winter 2017 ... this is assigning a permanent number to that class.

JOUR 282 | TOPICS IN VISUAL COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This class focuses on selected topics of visual communication with an emphasis on applicability to journalism. See schedule for description of current topic. Students are introduced to the theoretical best practices and technical skills of visual communication with attention to aspects such as lighting, framing, aperture, lens choices, and visual reporting ethics used by professional journalists.

JOUR 290 | JOURNALISM WORKSHOP (VARIABLE TOPICS) | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course allows students to sample variable topics that build skills in digital media and software and/or provide extra emphasis on particular topics of interest such as photography, video, social media, audience engagement, freelancing, issues affecting journalists from minority populations, and reporting on topics such as religion and environment.

JOUR 294 | HOW TO USE FOIA | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Open government laws like the Freedom of Information Act provide journalists with powerful reporting tools, but we don't always know how to use them. This class covers the most effective techniques for gaining access to public records and helps students become more skillful requesters, more effective reporters and better citizens. Students will learn to overcome records roadblocks; better understand government officials' perspectives so you can more successfully work with them; find more and better online resources and mine them effectively; and write document-based stories that resonate with readers.

JOUR 295 | COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARK LAW | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The expansion of digital media has made knowledge of intellectual property law more important than ever. In this class, students learn the basics of copyright and trademark law, including their own rights as creators and how to avoid infringing on the copyright and protected trademarks of others. Important case law is covered including providing an understanding of fair use, the public domain and trademark dilution. Learn the law as it applies to common activities including creating a website, sharing photos on Instagram, uploading videos to YouTube or posting your podcast to SoundCloud.

JOUR 301 | REPORTING FOR 14 EAST MAGAZINE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students gain hands-on experience reporting, writing and producing multimedia stories and other storytelling elements for the College of Communication's 14 East Magazine. (http://fourteeneastmag.com) Students may take the course twice for credit.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 302 | BUSINESS WRITING AND REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students develop skills for responsibly researching, reporting, writing, and editing business and financial news. Topics including reporting with data; ethical responsibilities of business journalists; and the unique opportunities available to the digital reporters of business and financial news.

JOUR 275 and 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 303 | ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on entrepreneurship and innovation in digital journalism and related digital media endeavors. The impact of digital technologies on the news industry is examined with special attention to changes in business and distribution models and the ways people consume and produce news. Students learn the basics of the business of digital journalism, including the financing digital start-ups and strategies for bringing digital media products or services to market.

JOUR 275 is a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 304 | INTRO TO DATA JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces techniques for more effective use of statistics and data in journalism and related mass communications professions. Students learn how to acquire, interpret and present data in multimedia formats, including skills in spreadsheet and data analysis for issues such as business, economics, entertainment, health care, science, politics, government and sports. Other emphases include public opinion polling, surveys, data visualization, and discussion of the legal and ethical issues that arise from reporting with data and numbers.

JOUR 275 is a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 309 | SPORTS TALK & MULTIMEDIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students learn best practices for careers related to sports talk through hands-on experience with audio, social media and related multimedia news content.

JOUR 310 | COMPARATIVE MEDIA SYSTEMS OR GLOBAL JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to major issues, concepts, and theories of international media and global journalism. It surveys the world's news systems, determinants of international news, development communication, communication and international relations, media responsibilities in international conflicts, communication technology, and the globalization of media.

JOUR 311 | CLIMATE CHANGE COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Individuals make up their minds on climate change, energy development, and other science of pressing public policy importance through a complex set of factors: values, demographics, political ideology, and so on. Journalists, strategic communicators, scientists, and policy analysts need to be able to communicate effectively with diverse public audiences on climate and energy topics. This course is oriented from a science communication perspective and draws on social scientific research on communicating on climate change and energy issues. We will take a human perspective on climate issues and focuses on the social, political and cultural aspects of climate change. The course covers best practices for promoting and facilitating public dialogue on climate change policy and global energy systems. Topics covered include: climate change public opinion and knowledge, media portrayals of climate change and its societal effects, climate skepticism and denial, psychological factors that contribute to values and beliefs on climate science, journalism and covering climate issues, framing and developing narratives on climate impacts, and climate change in popular culture. Students will conduct original research to analyze and evaluate climate change communication. For the final project, students have the option of completing a major journalistic reporting project, designing an advocacy or marketing campaign, or conducting a research project.

JOUR 316 | SOUND AND VISION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the unique ways that photography and audio documentary can blend together. The course will combine documentary and experimental production to help students learn to create audio documentary and visual projects and to work in mixed-media contexts.

JOUR 317 | EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students learn advanced reporting techniques while developing projects under the direction of a faculty supervisor. This course is designed to take learning out of the classroom and enables students to develop portfolio pieces while gaining critical real world experiences in reporting.

JOUR 325 | POLITICS & GOVERNMENT REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course teaches skills, resources and institutional context for covering politics, government, elections and other aspects of public affairs in Chicago and elsewhere. Students learn journalistic techniques and immerse in the political culture of Chicago. Topics include how are campaigns organized, financed and operated; how elections are covered; how to read polls and campaign finance reports; how and write stories based on records, data and other public affairs information.

JOUR 275 is a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 330 | WRITING FOR BROADCAST | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the writing and formatting requirements of broadcast journalists. Part of this instruction is to give students an understanding of how writing for broadcast differs from writing for print and the awareness it takes to write copy that supports and strengthens the visuals that viewers will be watching. Strong writing is the backbone of broadcast journalism, and this course gives students a firm foundation in the writing skills that produce broadcast stories worth watching.

JOUR 275 and 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 342 | SOCIAL MEDIA & THE NEWS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Journalists use mobile devices and social media in news-gathering, distributing content and engagement with active audiences. This course blends the theory and practice of social media to provide a hands-on introduction to, and practice on, a digital-first approach to journalism. We will analyze and apply a range of social and mobile media tools. This course has a dual purpose. On a skills level, you will be able to hone your professional social media practice and to build your technical skills with social media apps and platforms. By the end of the quarter you should have developed a "voice" on social platforms for your professional self. Secondly, we will put a critical lens to social journalism and the application of journalistic ethics to mobile and social media. The course covers emerging theory on social media, including: social listening, audience engagement and analytics, citizen journalism, visual storytelling, best practices for content curation and covering breaking news events with social tools, as well as verification of social content and ethics. You will develop and implement a professional social media strategy, practice with a variety of mobile journalism and social media tools and curate an online professional brand.

JOUR 275 is a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 343 | JOURNALISM AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This seminar analyzes the current condition of American print, broadcast and online journalism in light of their historic past. Journalism's social responsibilities and its functioning as a business are examined across major periods of American history-the colonial and revolutionary press, the early Republican and penny press, the Civil War press and the press of industrializing America, the rise of the tabloid press, and the role of the press in reporting the development of the United States as a world power during World War II and in its aftermath-will be captured.

JOUR 349 | TOPICS IN MEDIA LAW | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This class focuses on selected topics of First Amendment rights, media law, and press freedom. See schedule for description of current topic.

JOUR 350 | RADIO NEWS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Nowhere has the rise of new technologies had a greater impact than in radio reporting. This course gives students opportunities to stream their stories through field and studio productions that connect listeners within communities and around the world. Students will be trained in writing for the ear, and the unique local and international possibilities of radio reporting.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 355 | NEWSCAST PRODUCING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This class teaches the basics of television newscast production. This includes creating newscast rundowns, pacing the program, incorporating headlines and teases, slotting in weather and sports, and creating a logical and interesting order of stories. Newscast producers are in heavy demand in television news. This course provides the basics needed for working in that capacity.

JOUR 330 is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 360 | POLITICAL COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the political communication process, including the press, public opinion, civic life, elections, public policy, civic institutions, and other elements of democratic decision-making. Students study how journalists, politicians, citizens, and political strategists construct, transmit, and understand political messages at all levels of government, including how news, advertising, and entertainment media contribute to the shaping of political perceptions, emotions, and behaviors in a variety of circumstances domestically and internationally. Topics covered include how the political communication is affected by different forms of government and press systems; ownership and regulation economics of journalism; the sociological processes of the news industry; the psychological and sociological effects of news; and technological forces and shifting news consumption patterns.

JOUR 361 | JOURNALISM LAW AND ETHICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines legal and ethical issues in journalism with a focus on the First Amendment and the rights and responsibilities of the news media. Students will learn the constitutional rights of all citizens regarding censorship, defamation, privacy, intellectual property, and commercial speech, and will study how technological developments are challenging the courts with how to apply the law to digital media. Those legal aspects are considered in relation to case studies that chronicle journalists' ethical responsibilities, including protecting sources, balancing professional duties and personal values, sharing and using social media content, and avoiding deceptive reporting practices.

JOUR 362 | THE PRESS AND THE PRESIDENCY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This seminar describes the current and historic relationship between the mass media and the American presidency, focusing on the connections between press coverage to agenda-setting and public opinion in presidential campaigns. Students will analyze conditions in which press-presidential relations are cooperative or adversarial, including the market forces that have shaped that relationship and the news values that have reinforced it.

JOUR 364 | INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will include discussions and reporting projects that will analyze how investigative story ideas are developed; how decisions are made in the selection and development of investigative stories; how public records and other sources of information are obtained and used in investigative reporting; ethical dilemmas; and the impact of investigative journalism on public opinion and policy, with a particular focus on issues of race, diversity, and urban affairs.

JOUR 275 and 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 365 | TELEVISION NEWS I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a course in electronic newsgathering. Student teams will shoot and edit stand up news packages. To do this, students will learn the basic elements in developing a broadcast news story--from originating the story idea, researching it, illustrating it, doing interviews, and then packaging the story for air.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 330 are a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 366 | MAGAZINE REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The digital world of reporting and editing has created unparalleled opportunities to reach specific readers with targeted stories. This course introduces students to the opportunities of magazine writing and the strategies used by magazine writers. Writing assignments will strengthen a student's grasp of the resources available to modern magazine writers and the techniques of research and interviewing that are the basis of skilled storytelling.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 367 | INTERNATIONAL REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed as a workshop to introduce students to the practice of international reporting. It provides students with the background, knowledge and techniques needed to cover world affairs. Discussion topics include reporting strategies, challenges and opportunities for foreign correspondence in the light of globalization and technological change. Students are expected to develop cross-cultural sensitivity and critical thinking about international news. As much as possible, the course links global issues to the local community.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 368 | SPORTS REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Sports reporting is a go-to destination for online, print, and broadcast consumers of sports information. This course gives students an understanding of the social and cultural significance of sports. It trains them to look for themes and details that go beyond the simple score of a contest to the symbolic importance of athletics in the post-modern experience. Students will complete the course with a new appreciation for what makes for strong sports reporting and what accounts for its unique hold on the popular imagination.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 370 | MULTIMEDIA NEWS PRODUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course builds on what students learned in Introduction to Online Reporting and Production. The emphasis is on developing a story package that utilizes interactivity and multimedia features to engage the online audience.The class is designed to simulate the workflow in digital newsrooms. Students are expected to develop and manage content for a class project, thereby gaining hands-on learning of the process of multimedia news production.

JOUR 280 is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 371 | ADVANCED REPORTING I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Advanced Reporting I combines classroom instruction with hands-on field experience producing professional-quality broadcast reporting. Students select a single topic for the class and participate in the initial research, production, scripting and editing. Some stories may take longer than one quarter to complete, therefore a two-quarter commitment is required. In addition students must have a working knowledge of government at the local, state and federal level. Students will be required to file Freedom of Information Act requests and track campaign contributions. The class is open to a limited number of underclass and graduate students who will need to make application for the class at the Center for Journalism, Integrity and Excellence.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 and instructor permission are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 372 | ADVANCED REPORTING II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Advanced Reporting II is a continuation of the project work started in JOUR 371 and combines classroom instruction with hands-on field experience broadcast reporting. Students continue reporting work on their topics including research, production, scripting and editing. Projects reach completion in the second of the two-course sequence. As in JOUR 371, students must have a working knowledge of government at the local, state and federal level. Students will be required to file Freedom of Information Act requests and track campaign contributions. The class is open to a limited number of underclass and graduate students who will need to make application for the class at the Center for Journalism, Integrity and Excellence.

JOUR 275, JOUR 278, JOUR 371 and instructor consent are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 374 | COMMUNITY JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students will examine the work of major news chains that have begun experimenting with local coverage patterns that are informed by community leaders and community organizations identifying what matters in their community. Supporters of this approach claim it is the future for news organizations attempting to fulfill their social responsibility. Critics claim it undermines the independence of the press.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 375 | LONG FORM JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a project-based television reporting class that emphasizes longer form magazine and documentary journalism. Students will examine and apply story telling methods used in television news magazine programs and documentaries. The course will cover story arcs, character development, timelines, and other form techniques. Students will be in the field producing TV news magazine and mini-documentary reports.

JOUR 365 or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 376 | TOPICS IN JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Focuses on a specific topic related to the field of journalism. See schedule for description of current topic.

JOUR 377 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Focuses on a specific topic related to the field of journalism. Included might be such topics as sports reporting, Chicago journalism, tabloid journalism, and Front Page news. See schedule for description of current topic.

JOUR 275 and 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 380 | REPORTING FOR GOOD DAY DEPAUL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will give students extensive experience doing on-air reporting for the DePaul student television news program, "Good Day DePaul." Reporters will cover breaking news stories, features, and serious enterprise stories. Students must have experience shooting in the field and editing in Final Cut Pro, either through previous television news courses at DePaul, or from other work. Students will be permitted to take this course in two different quarters.

JOUR 365 and 278 are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 382 | ADVANCED PHOTOJOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course builds on the introductory lessons of Photojournalism training by helping students gain experience with professional photo equipment and building skills in publishing images professionally. Students will learn about shooting, editing and sharing their work via digital media platforms while developing an understanding of the ethical obligations of photographers in news organizations.

JOUR 276 (or instructor permission) is a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 385 | TELEVISION NEWS II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Television News II builds on the knowledge students have gained in our introductory Television News class in producing news packages for broadcast. Students will develop longer format feature pieces that combine skills in writing, reporting, shooting, narration, editing, and producing. The best of this work should serve as portfolio pieces for students considering careers in broadcasting and related industries. TV News I and Writing for Broadcast are prerequisites for taking this course.

JOUR 365 or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 389 | LIFESTYLE REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course gives students the tools to write Lifestyle stories and to think creatively. Assignments will include human-interest stories, health, fitness, design, fashion, food, leisure and social issues. The class concentrates on the tools reporters need to create this kind of work, from good quotes to relevant sourcing.

JOUR 275 and 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 390 | WRITING FOR THE DEPAULIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed for the serious journalism student who wants on-deadline experience writing for The DePaulia newspaper and web site. Students will cover beats of interest to the DePaul community throughout the quarter and also will receive assignments from DePaulia editors. Stories and beats can be as varied as campus news, sports, the arts or news in the Lincoln Park and South Loop communities. Students may repeat the course once for credit. Not available for DePaulia editors.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 396 | JOURNALISM CAPSTONE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students connect their journalism skills and knowledge with their learning in liberal studies to contemplate journalism's societal responsibilities and construct a multimedia reporting project that informs the public about an important issue. Students report for 10 weeks on a subject of societal significance and assemble a digital portfolio of their work from classes, internships, and student media. They analyze, synthesize, and reflect on material that draws interdisciplinary connections to deepen their understanding of journalism's democratic function, probe professional ethical issues, and improve their ability to articulate complex ideas when reporting the news.

Senior standing and status as either a Journalism or Communication and Media major are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 398 | JOURNALISM STUDY AWAY/ABROAD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course exposes students to experiential learning and immersive educational experiences in newsrooms and professional journalism worksites at locations around the nation and world. Sites may vary based on topic but include key locations in the journalism world such as New York City. Students apply concepts from their journalism course work to their experience during the study away/abroad, articular the impact of the experience on their understanding of how professional news operates, and reflect on how the experience helps them add depth to their understanding of professional journalism ethics and its application to their career goals.

JOUR 275 and JOUR 278 are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 501 | THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to the historic development of social responsibility theory and its continuing role in defining the obligations of journalists in creating an informed citizenry as a critical part of the democratic process. The course analyzes the ongoing tension between journalistic responsibility and the obligations of news organizations to turn profits for their shareholders and the constitutional imprimatur of journalism to offer the information that makes self-governance possible.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 502 | NEWS NOW: JOURNALISM IN THE INFORMATION AGE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course offers students a culmination of their journalism graduate experience through reflection and reinforcement of key concepts and skills in writing, cross-platform reporting, media history, ethics, and new frontiers in journalism. Students work with the instructor to customize a reporting or research project on a topic of their interest that reflects their professional development. Through experimentation on a project-based learning experience, students demonstrate their understanding of the process of handling, presenting and evaluating the news of the day as well as the social responsibility of journalists.

Status as a graduate Journalism student with at least 24 credits is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 503 | REPORTING FOR CONVERGED NEWSROOMS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to equip journalists with the techniques needed in assembling and producing stories that can be published and distributed across integrated media platforms. Students will learn to write and edit reports for online media in ways that add value to stories and encourage readers to drill down into these news narratives for information worth knowing. Students will develop an understanding of how newsgathering practices are evolving through digital media and the role of teamwork in disseminating these stories to an informed citizenry.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 504 | MULTIMEDIA NEWS PRODUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course builds on what students learned in basic online journalism classes. The emphasis is on producing a story package that utilizes interactivity and multimedia features to engage the online audience. The class is designed to simulate the workflow in digital newsrooms. Students are expected to develop and manage content for a class project, thereby gaining hands-on learning of the process of multimedia news production. (Formerly Backpack Reporting)

JOUR 503 and status as a Graduate Journalism student are a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 505 | TELEVISION NEWS REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will teach students how to be responsible broadcast news reporters, anchors, producers, and editors, who bring added value to stories in today's converged newsroom environment. Students will learn all aspects of the news gathering and distribution process from story conception to the research, interviewing, reporting, writing, shooting, editing, and producing that goes into a successful, must-see story.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 506 | NEWSCAST PRODUCING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will teach the skills necessary to become a television newscast producer, one of the most important jobs in a news department. Students will learn which stories should go into a newscast, how much time to give those stories, and what order the stories should run in during the program. They will also learn about some of the key elements of a newscast: headlines, teases, transitions into sports and weather, and end pieces. Finally, the course will cover many of the ethical and philosophical issues a producer will face on a daily basis.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 507 | VISUAL COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course gives students a theoretical and practical grounding in the digital world of photo-journalism. Students will be introduced to the wide array of tools available to reporters in illustrating content from their stories on the web. This includes the hardware and software packages now available in digital story-telling and how citizens use the information in interpreting the news of the day.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 509 | JOURNALISM LAW AND ETHICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the philosophical roots of the First Amendment and how free speech jurisprudence impacts the journalism profession. Students will learn how legal and moral issues arise when newsgathering and free speech conflict with other constitutional and common law rights, and how developments in technology and economics are creating new challenges for journalists and the courts.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 510 | SPORTS REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course gives students an historic understanding of the role of the sports writer and sports section and the impact the online universe is having on sports writing and reporting. Students will learn the values of modern sports editors and the techniques used by modern sports writers. Students will learn the perspective and context that makes good sports writing truly exceptional.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 511 | ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Arts and Entertainment reporting is among the most widely read, but often is the most poorly executed aspect of a publication or broadcast. Students taking this course will develop a critical appreciation for the role of arts and entertainment reporting in the history of the press and its current role in creating a culture that appreciates and understands the arts and their profound contribution to human understanding.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 512 | BUSINESS WRITING AND REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will help students better understand the critical role that business and finance reporting plays in the United States and the world economy. Students will develop the techniques that are necessary in responsibly researching, reporting, writing, and editing business and financial news. Segments of the course will be devoted to the history of the discipline, the ethical responsibilities of the business press, and the unique opportunities now available to the digital reporter of business and financial news.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 513 | POLITICAL REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course analyzes what is distinctive about Chicago reporting. Students will be introduced to the rich tradition and history of reporting in this city, and the central role this work has played in the development of urban reporting nationwide. To do this, students will take a close look at the institutions, people, neighborhoods, decision-makers and events that impact Chicago residents in their everyday lives. The emphasis will be on localizing our approach to stories through a beat system that will allow students to regularly report on important areas of municipal life.

Completion of at least 8 JOUR graduate credits or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 514 | OPINION AND COLUMN WRITING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students will learn what makes for extraordinary opinion and column writing with an emphasis on strong reporting that enables writers to assemble arguments based on the firm foundation of fact. Also examined will be the new ways in which digital delivery systems both empower and threaten the free flow of ideas within and across interest communities.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 515 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Topics have included Advanced Reporting; The Chicago Olympics; The Press and The Presidency; Reporting Campaign 2008; and From Franklin to the Internet: A History of American Journalism. Students pursuing the Sports Journalism concentration can use the following courses: Reporting the Olympics, Sports Blogging, and Sports Universe as special topics courses to count towards the concentration.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 517 | EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING IN JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students learn advanced reporting techniques while developing projects under the direction of a faculty supervisor. This course is designed to take learning out of the classroom and enables students to develop portfolio pieces while gaining critical real world experiences in reporting. Instructor Permission Required.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 518 | WRITING AND REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course teaches foundational journalistic skills in writing and reporting for those students coming into the program without significant previous course work or professional experience in journalism.

Status as a Graduate Journalism student and department consent are prerequisites for this course.

JOUR 519 | INTERNATIONAL REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed as a workshop to introduce students to the practice of international reporting. It provides students with the background, knowledge and techniques needed to cover world affairs. Discussion topics include reporting strategies, challenges and opportunities for foreign correspondence in the light of globalization and technological change. Students are expected to develop cross-cultural sensitivity and critical thinking about international news. As much as possible, the course links global issues to the local community.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 520 | DATA JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Data Journalism explores methods and practices in news reporting with the tools of social science. Students will learn how to collect, verify, manage, analyze, interpret and present data, including skills used in database management, data analysis software and data visualization. This class focuses on finding newsworthy stories hidden behind numbers and writing data-driven reports. Students will learn best practices and pitfalls involved in data-based reporting.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 521 | SPORTS PRODUCING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will focus on producing sports content for broadcast with an emphasis in television production. Students will learn to write and produce compelling stories through the lens of sports, including coverage of DePaul athletics. The best of this work will be featured on DePaul's broadcast and online outlets as well as the university's athletics website. Instructor permission required for this course. Students must have a working knowledge of television production equipment.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 522 | MULTI-PLATFORM NEWS EDITING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to editing and publishing procedures, including proofreading, copy editing and headline writing for various publications, including newspapers and online media. Skills are emphasized in AP style, grammar, usage, punctuation, story organization, brevity, basic layout, photo editing, cutline writing, news judgment, ethics and print/online headline writing. In addition to editing basics, students learn industry-standard InDesign software to lay out print news pages.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 523 | ONLINE SPORTS REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students will report, write, edit and produce online stories about sports issues, features and other topics. Skills are emphasized in game coverage, sports blogging, building a sports community on Twitter, shooting and editing video, recording and editing audio, and building basic web pages in HTML. The course also will explore ethical and legal issues pertaining to video and audio usage rights, athlete branding and other topics in the multimedia sports journalism culture.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 524 | WRITING FOR THE DEPAULIA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed for the serious Journalism student who wants on-deadline experience writing for The DePaulia newspaper and website. Students will cover stories from each section of the paper (news, features, entertainment, opinion and sports) throughout the quarter. Some assignments will come from DePaulia editors, but students are expected to come up with their own ideas. Stories can be as varied as campus news or news in the Lincoln Park and South Loop communities. Supplementing stories with photos and video is expected.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 525 | URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

There are stories hidden in plain sight throughout the city, and this course will cover how to find and cover those stories from the ground up. Urban Affairs Reporting will focus on the stories that happen beyond City Hall, in neighborhoods and communities, among individuals and groups - stories that influence and are influenced by government, business, and other powerful institutions. The course will help students improve their ability to develop sources, find story ideas, and thereby cover critical urban issues with greater depth, originality, and excitement. Students will learn how to report these often fascinating stories across a variety of print and online platforms.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 526 | POLITICAL COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines how political communication and related media affect public opinion, civic life, elections, and public policy, and the impact of these communication dynamics on civic institutions and democratic decision-making. Students will study how journalists, elected officials, citizens, and political strategists construct, use, and understand political messages, including how news, advertising, and entertainment media contribute to the shaping of political perceptions, emotions, and behaviors in a variety of circumstances domestically and internationally.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 527 | LIFESTYLE REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will give students the tools to write Lifestyle stories and to think creatively. Assignments will include human-interest stories, health, fitness, design, fashion, food, leisure and social issues. The class will concentrate on the tools reporters need to create this kind of work, from good quotes to relevant sourcing.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 528 | REPORTING FOR GOOD DAY DEPAUL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will give students extensive experience doing on-air reporting for the DePaul student television news program, "Good Day DePaul." Reporters will cover breaking news stories, features, and serious enterprise stories. Students must have experience shooting in the field and editing in Final Cut Pro, either through previous television news courses at DePaul, or from other work.

JOUR 505 and status as a Graduate Journalism student are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 529 | ONLINE NEWS BUREAU | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course offers first-hand experience on a digital newsroom. Students should already have a grasp of basic online journalism skills through earlier classes or practical experience. The emphasis of the course is on producing high-quality stories both in terms of content and in terms of presentation. Throughout the quarter, students will work as multimedia producers, editors and reporters to create content for thewiredloop.info, a platform for news experimentation.

JOUR 503 and status as a Graduate Journalism student are a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 530 | RADIO NEWS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The radio news business has been radically altered through the rise of new media. This course analyzes that transformation. The move of radio news to the web has greatly increased opportunities for local and community-based reporting. Radio News helps students acquire the skill sets they'll need to do socially responsible work in this new and challenging environment. This course prepares students for careers in radio news and documentary by training them in the audio platforms and news narratives that have made radio one of the strongest of personalized, niche media in the digital landscape.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 531 | JOURNALISM BY NUMBERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Journalism by Numbers introduces students to techniques for using numbers, data, statistics, and quantitative reasoning to improve their reporting. Students learn how to interpret data for reporting on issues such as business, economics, health care, science, politics, and sports. Other topics include public opinion polling, statistical analysis software, and discussion of the legal and ethical issues that arise from data analysis and data reporting.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 532 | THE PRESS AND THE PRESIDENCY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course analyzes the historic competition between candidates, the media, and presidential campaigns. It examines how public understanding of political issues, public policy, and the candidates is created. We'll drill down into conditions that lead to a cooperative or adversarial press in campaign reporting and how the public perceives the political process and the role of the press in forming public opinion in presidential campaigns and during presidencies.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 533 | JOURNALISM & FREEDOM OF INFORMATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on developing skills in obtaining, interpreting and reporting using public records available from the government. Students will complete hands-on assignments on how to acquire public records, including law enforcement and court documents; how to file FOIA requests and appeals, and other legal remedies for obtaining publicly available information; and how to decipher government records and spreadsheets for use in documents-driven reporting. By sharpening skills on access and use of public records for journalism, the course better equips students to fulfill the watchdog role of the press. (Formerly PUBLIC RECORDS REPORTING)

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 534 | TOPICS IN PHOTOJOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a practicum designed to prepare visual journalists for the skills they'll need in a rapidly changing profession. Students will learn about the strategic use of photographs in digital storytelling, including the role of photographs in multimedia production. Students will also understand the ethical obligations faced by today's photojournalist.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 535 | RADIO DEPAUL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course enables students in journalism to learn on air and production skills in news, public affairs, and sports programming. This experiential learning class enables students to work at our award-winning student radio operation, where participants host shows, cover DePaul sports, and develop long format news, interviews, and public affairs programming.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 536 | SPORTS BLOGGING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Blogging has become an essential component of all sports coverage, and this course will provide the skills to excel in this growing area of journalism. Students will learn about news tracking, news aggregation, the fundamentals of blog posts, social media and multimedia in blogging, live blogging, and being part of an online community. By building blogs they'll have an opportunity to brand themselves as sports journalists and learn how to become an authoritative voice in a particular area of sports.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 537 | FROM FRANKLIN TO THE INTERNET: A HISTORY OF AMERICAN JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course analyzes the impact journalism has had and is having on the country and the impact technologies have had on journalism. We examine the stories journalism tells, how it tells them, and the difference it makes in American society, culture, and politics.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 538 | MASS COMMUNICATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the rise of the information age through the development of new media platforms and the changing impact media are having in creating community and shaping citizenship and American life as journalism, radio, television, film, advertising, and public relations transition from analog to digital eras.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 539 | CURRENT ISSUES IN THE JOURNALISM INDUSTRY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course probes all aspects of the journalism industry and media business, including issues of funding models, revenue, editorial, marketing, advertising, and distribution. (formerly THE FUTURE OF AD-SUPPORTED MEDIA)

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 540 | THE INTERNET, TECHNOLOGY, AND POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores the evolving relationships that reside at the intersection of the internet and politics. Some of the themes covered in the course include the ways in which politicians and organizations use the internet and new media and how this is changing the relationship between governments and citizens. (Cross-listed with PSC 315 Internet, Technology and Politics)

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 541 | MASS MEDIA & AMERICAN POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores the role of the media in American politics and the impact it has on government, policymaking, campaigning, and most importantly, the general public. The course has three major sections: an analysis of the news media as a political and economic institution; an examination of the ways in which political actors try to shape the messages transmitted through the media; and an investigation of the effects media have on citizens. (Cross-listed with PSC 321 Mass Media and American Politics)

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 542 | SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE NEWS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Journalists use mobile devices and social media in newsgathering, distributing content and engagement with active audiences. This course blends the theory and practice of social media to provide you with a hands-on introduction to, and practice on, a digital-first approach to journalism. We will analyze and apply a range of social and mobile media tools. This course has a duel purpose: on a skills level, you?ll be able to hone your professional social media practice and to build your technical skills with social media apps and platforms. By the end of the quarter you?ll have an online professional portfolio and should have developed a ?voice? on social platforms for your professional self. We will put a critical lens to social journalism and the application of journalistic ethics to mobile and social media. The course covers emerging concepts on social media, including: networked gatekeeping, social listening as applied to journalism, audience engagement and analytics, citizen journalism, visual storytelling, best practices for content curation and covering breaking news events with social tools, as well as verification of social content and ethics. You will develop and implement a professional social media strategy, practice with a variety of mobile journalism and social media tools.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 543 | LONG FORM REPORTING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is a project-based television reporting class that emphasizes longer form magazine and documentary journalism. Students will examine and apply story telling methods used in television news magazine programs and documentaries. The course will cover story arcs, character development, timelines, and other form techniques. Students will be in the field producing TV news magazine and mini-documentary reports.

JOUR 505 and status as a Graduate Journalism student are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 544 | ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on entrepreneurship and innovation in digital media. The impact of digital technologies on the news industry is examined with attention to changes in business and distribution models. Students gain a better understanding how to turn ideas into sustainable plans for new socially responsible start-up businesses, including the basics of digital news finances and strategies for bringing products or services to market. Students get hands-on experience with social media monitoring software, web analytics, and other tools for engaging audiences.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 545 | NEWS DOCUMENTARY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students learn how to conceive, research, report, and tell news documentary video and film stories in this hands-on course that requires no formal documentary experience. Use state-of-the-art video and audio editing tools to create news video projects.

Status as a graduate student in Journalism or Digital Communication and Media Arts is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 548 | ADVANCED GRADUATE REPORTING FOR GOOD DAY DePAUL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will allow graduate students to take a second quarter of Reporting for Good Day DePaul. It will provide enhanced work in reporting, writing and video production. It will also provide additional instruction in interview lighting, graphics, and high-end sound techniques. On the research side, it will include a paper on issues in television journalism.

JOUR 528 and status as a Graduate Journalism student are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 551 | ADVANCED REPORTING I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Advanced Reporting I combines classroom instruction with hands-on field experience producing professional-quality broadcast reporting. Students select a single topic for the class and participate in the initial research, production, scripting and editing. Some stories may take longer than one quarter to complete, therefore a two-quarter commitment is required. Graduate students will function as senior producers and editors helping oversee the initial research, production, scripting and editing of a story selected by the class. In addition students must have a working knowledge of government at the local, state and federal level. Students will be required to file Freedom of Information Act requests and track campaign contributions. The class is open to a limited number of underclass and graduate students who will need to make application for the class at the Center for Journalism, Integrity and Excellence.

Status as a JOUR graduate student and instructor permission are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 552 | ADVANCED REPORTING II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Advanced Reporting II is a continuation of the project work started in JOUR 551 and combines classroom instruction with hands-on field experience producing broadcast reporting. Graduate students function as senior producers and editors helping oversee the initial research, production, scripting and editing of a story selected by the class. Students continue reporting work on their topics including research, production, scripting and editing. Projects reach completion in the second of the two-course sequence. As in JOUR 551, students must have a working knowledge of government at the local, state and federal level. Students will be required to file Freedom of Information Act requests and track campaign contributions. The class is open to a limited number of underclass and graduate students who will need to make application for the class at the Center for Journalism, Integrity and Excellence.

JOUR 551 and status as a Graduate Journalism student are prerequisites for this class.

JOUR 587 | SOUND AND VISION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to the unique ways that photography and audio documentary can blend together. The course will combine documentary and experimental production to help students learn to create audio documentary and visual projects and to work in mixed-media contexts.

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 588 | REPORTING FOR 14 EAST MAGAZINE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students gain hands-on experience reporting, writing and producing multimedia stories and other storytelling elements for the College of Communication's 14 East Magazine (http://fourteeneastmag.com)

Status as a College of Communication Graduate Student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 590 | JOURNALISM WORKSHOP | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course allows students to sample variable topics that build skills in digital media and software and/or provide extra emphasis on particular topics of interest such as photography, video, social media, audience engagement, freelancing, issues affecting journalists from minority populations, and reporting on topics such as religion and environment.

Status as a Graduate Communication student is a prerequisite for this class

JOUR 594 | HOW TO USE FOIA | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Open government laws like the Freedom of Information Act provide journalists with powerful reporting tools, but we don't always know how to use them. This class covers the most effective techniques for gaining access to public records and helps students become more skillful requesters, more effective reporters and better citizens. Students will learn to overcome records roadblocks; better understand government officials' perspectives so you can more successfully work with them; find more and better online resources and mine them effectively; and write document-based stories that resonate with readers.

JOUR 595 | COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARK LAW | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The expansion of digital media has made knowledge of intellectual property law more important than ever. In this class, students learn the basics of copyright and trademark law, including their own rights as creators and how to avoid infringing on the copyright and protected trademarks of others. Important case law is covered including providing an understanding of fair use, the public domain and trademark dilution. Learn the law as it applies to common activities including creating a website, sharing photos on Instagram, uploading videos to YouTube or posting your podcast to SoundCloud.

Status as a Graduate Communication student or department consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 598 | JOURNALISM STUDY AWAY/ABROAD | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students expand their learning opportunities in domestic study away or study abroad contexts that introduce them to different professional journalism contexts and prepare them to be successful, innovative leaders and community members in a diverse global society.

JOUR 602 | CANDIDACY CONTINUATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is a 0-credit hour course that requires permission from the graduate director. Students can enroll in this course if they are finishing a course in which they received an incomplete (IN) and are not registered for any other regular credit-bearing courses in the quarter they plan to finish the incomplete. Enrollment in this course is limited to the two quarters following the quarter of the original incomplete (IN) grade. Enrollment in this course allows access to the library and other campus facilities. This course does not carry any enrollment status. Students enrolled in this course are not eligible for loan deferment or student loans. This course is not graded. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.