Curriculum Studies (CS)

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CS 447 | CURRICULUM DESIGN FOR THE MIDDLE GRADES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the history of and rationale for middle level education as well as the curricular and pedagogical knowledge needed to meaningfully engage middle level students in learning within and across the content areas. Important considerations and strategies for disciplinary and interdisciplinary learning in the middle school classroom, as well as the importance of reading and writing across the curriculum with regard to these, will be addressed.

CS 460 | LEARNING IN A TECHNOLOGY-SUPPORTED CLASSROOM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

An examination of current theories about instructional technology and of recent literature in the field. Students will become familiar with particular technology appropriate for their areas of interest and will learn to evaluate this technology for a variety of instructional purposes. The course includes: frameworks for classifying educational uses of the technology; an analysis of selected research on educational technology; theories and practices of using technology in classrooms; and the advantages and disadvantages of distance learning. Emphasis throughout will be on why and how technology can be used to enhance the learning process.

CS 461 | LITERACY PROCESSES AND PRACTICES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Foundational theoretical perspectives and practices for teaching and learning language and literacy in a diverse, changing, and political world. Background of knowledge in the area of learning and exposure to the controversies that surround the teaching of literacy will be used to develop an understanding of literacy learning in action. Students will be invited to participate in the current conversations around literacy learning and teaching in order to inform their everyday curricular decisions.

CS 463 | ASSESSMENT, DIAGNOSIS, DEVELOPMENTAL/REMEDIAL MATERIALS & RESOURCES: EMERGENT & DEVELOPING READING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Assessment, diagnosis and instructional planning for early and emergent learners. Building on a knowledge base of emergent reading processes and literacy practices, teachers will explore the ways in which young learners construct meaning and use language purposefully in their unique social worlds, even before beginning school. Participants in this course will learn to use performance based assessments as well as more formal standardized measures of achievement to support emerging and struggling readers with appropriate materials and theoretically sound instructional practices.

CS 461 is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 464 | ASSESSMENT, DIAGNOSIS, DEVELOPMENTAL/REMEDIAL MATERIALS & RESOURCES:MIDDLE SCHOOL/ADOLESCENT READING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Assessment, diagnosis and instructional planning for middle school students. Building on a knowledge base of reading processes and literacy practices, teachers will explore the ways in which students construct meaning and use language purposefully in their unique social worlds. Participants in this course will learn to use performance based assessments as well as more formal standardized measures of achievement to support middle school and adolescent readers with appropriate materials and theoretically sound instructional practices.

CS 461 is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 465 | TEACHING READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on teaching reading in various subject (content) areas and emphasizes non-fiction reading process, strategies, and theories for grades K-9. The course will examine what it means to be literate in the elementary content areas (e.g. science, math, social studies, arts). Emphasis will be placed on learning effective literacy strategies for different subject areas. There will also be a focus on how one uses reading and writing to think, act, speak, question, and apply the tools of each content/subject area in ways that are unique to that discipline. Additionally, as teachers it is important to remember that students will bring various literacies from their homes and communities. An important emphasis will be on creating learning environments that honor student diversity, and learning about multiple ways of knowing, acting, and communicating.

CS 461 is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 470 | TEACHERS AS LEADERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Assists teachers in becoming leaders for positive change in schools and districts. Provides overview of major theoretical models in research on teaching and teacher leadership, historical perspectives on the teaching profession, and overview of select best practice in teacher collaboration, mentoring and coaching. Specific topics addressed may include: developing leadership among existing teaching staff; fostering professional collaboration; improving instruction school-wide; organizing colleagues, administrators, parents and students to improve achievement; fostering sustainability in teaching/fighting teacher attrition; teaching standards; team teaching; and curriculum mapping.

CS 471 | DIVERSITY IN THE CLASSROOM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Examines issues related to diversity that result when students from diverse socioeconomic, cultural, linguistic, and academic backgrounds are in the same classroom. Explores the impact of inclusion, ESL, bilingual, and bicultural programs on instruction. Emphasis on developing strategies to meet individual student needs within the regular classroom.

CS 472 | ETHICS, CURRICULUM AND SOCIAL CHANGE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Explores some major issues impacting curriculum, including cultural and socioeconomic factors, legal issues, conflicting values, pressures for assessment, and the push to include technology. Examines the historical development and current state of education in the U.S. as compared to education in other cultures. Emphasis on ways that educators can work as change agents within the competing demands of these forces.

CS 473 | ASSESSMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Explores current theory and practice regarding alternate forms of assessment, including formal, standardized, and informal tests and inventories; selection, evaluation, and interpretation of tests used in educational settings; portfolio assessment, video performances, and presentations; preparation and use of teacher-made tests; evaluating outcomes; and utilizing data to improve instruction. The critical examination of multiple perspectives of assessment theories, policies and practices center around the emphasis on developing strategies to evaluate student progress.

CS 481 | THE STUDY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A selective survey and analysis of research on teachers and teaching. Particular emphasis will be placed on the assumptions which are built into various forms of research and the effect these assumptions have on how results should be interpreted and used in supervision and curriculum development. Each student will be expected to become familiar with alternative ways of studying teachers and the teaching process in his/her area of expertise. While many school settings will be utilized because of the many studies done in this area, research in non-school settings will be given a good deal of emphasis.

CS 482 | THE HISTORY OF CURRICULUM PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A survey of trends and movements in curriculum practice. Particular emphasis will be placed on the recurrent nature of curriculum practices and the reasons for this. The class will consider underlying models of curriculum practice in their historical settings as possible methods for meeting contemporary social needs as well as the assets and liabilities of these models.

CS 484 | MULTIMEDIA MATERIALS PRODUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will analyze the role of multimedia materials in instruction. A variety of media will be explored (including software, internet, audio, video, and film). Students will be expected to manipulate a variety of images and produce sample materials for critique and analysis. The primary focus will be on enhancing learning in elementary and secondary schools.

CS 485 | CURRICULUM/PROGRAM EVALUATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Evaluation is essential for curriculum/program development and implementation. Hence, understanding evaluation methods, technologies, and quality criteria is particularly relevant to educational leaders, curriculum/program designers, and technology specialists. In this course, students will critically examine a variety of current evaluation models, instruments, and resources. Students will also conduct a comprehensive analysis of a significant evaluation study relevant to their specific professional interest. Registration is restricted to students in Advanced Master's programs.

Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 487 | INTRODUCTION TO CURRICULUM DELIBERATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

An introduction to systematic and collaborative deliberation on curriculum problems. A pattern for deliberation (including situation analysis, problem discrimination and formulation, development of alternative courses of action, and anticipation of consequences) will be developed and exemplified. This pattern will be contrasted with other descriptions of curriculum planning. Each student will complete a project which describes his/her systematic formulation of a curriculum problem and a plan of action for resolving it.

Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 488 | CURRICULUM DESIGN | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Provides a project-based opportunity to develop curriculum that promotes student understanding, student voice, and student involvement in school or community change. Encourages educators to think carefully about what does and should constitute the curriculum and why, who and what is served and who/what is marginalized by current curriculum arrangements, and how collaboration in curriculum design can assist in organizing classrooms, schools, and communities.

CS 489 | CREATIVITY AND CRITICAL THINKING - VYGOTSKY, BAKHTIN, MAKIGUCHI, IKEDA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Introduces students to the educational philosophies of Russian thinkers Lev Vygotsky (1896 - 1934) and Mikhail Bakhtin (1895 - 1975) and Japanese thinkers Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871 - 1944) and Daisaku Ikeda (1928 - ). Students will locate confluences in these thinkers' philosophies and apply them to current curriculum or curriculum theorizing in their chosen discipline(s) (e.g., mathematics, social studies, language education, etc.), context(s) (e.g., policy, gender, socioeconomics, identity, etc.) and K-12/adult level(s). Topics covered include, among others, cultural-historical theory, socially constructed meaning making, zone of proximal development, dialogism, carnival, value and value-creating pedagogy, humanitarian competition, and human revolution.

CS 492 | CREATING AND SUSTAINING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will provide the framework for the creation, development and sustainability of a professional learning community. Professional learning communities have at their core three guiding principles: 1) a focus on learning, 2) the creation of a collaborative culture and 3) a results-orientation. Within the professional learning community, members are committed to working collaboratively in an ongoing process of collective inquiry and action research in order to achieve better results for the students and community they serve. Professional Learning Communities operate under the assumption that the key to improved learning for students is continuous, job-embedded learning for educators.

CS 493 | CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT IN K-12 SCHOOLS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course prepares future school leaders with knowledge; understanding; and application of planning, assessment, and instructional leadership for roles in the K-12 school setting at the supervisory or administrative level. The emphasis of the course will be planning, implementation, and refinement of standards-based curriculum aligned with instruction, assessment, and instructional decisions as they affect the teaching and learning environment of the school with diverse cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and special needs populations.

CS 494 | CURRICULUM 2.0: CURRICULUM FOR LEARNING IN GLOBAL NETWORKS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will explore curriculum theories and practices for the age of global networks, including themes such as the shift from industrial to post-industrial educational paradigms, online learning, and more. New communications technologies make it possible for teaching and learning to take place anywhere and anytime, in many cases under conditions radically different from those of formal schooling. This course considers the implications of curriculum under such conditions.

CS 495 | DESIGN THINKING IN EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Design Thinking is a problem solving methodology for collaborative innovation. This course introduces the methods of design thinking applied to curriculum design and education in general. Students will learn how to use design thinking for insight, ideation, and implementation of collaborative solutions to complex educational problems. In addition, students will understand design thinking within the context of the history of ideas and be able to critically analyze and evaluate implementations of design thinking in a variety of educational settings.

CS 579 | RESEARCH IN TEACHING READING: DEVELOPMENTAL & REMEDIAL READING INSTRUCTION & SUPPORT: BEST PRACTICES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students will explore and analyze current literacy research through the critical lenses of educational practitioners. Students will: identify meaningful questions about literacy practices in their classrooms and schools; create a plan for addressing the identified research question(s); collect and analyze data relevant to the research question(s); and organize and present the research findings. This inquiry project, or an extension of it, may subsequently become the basis for the student's Master's paper or thesis.

CS 461 is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 580 | RESEARCH SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to help graduate students in Curriculum Studies through the difficult process of planning, organizing, drafting, and revising their Master's papers. Students will be expected to complete a literature review and to develop a strong proposal for an integrative paper as a prelude to selecting an advisor for their Master's papers. For M.Ed. students only.

SCG 410, 6 additional graduate courses and status as an Advanced Masters student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 582 | PRACTICUM IN CURRICULUM STUDIES: READING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides directed experiences in decision-making for curriculum, participation, and leadership in the planning and management of reading curricula. Students will: assess students' reading capabilities; make informed curricular choices to address students' needs; identify and implement short and long-term learning goals for students; manage instructional materials needed to guide students; develop curriculum based on assessments of the needs of students. It is designed to offer students an opportunity to put into practice, in a summer school classroom, previous learning about the teaching of reading, especially their beliefs and understandings regarding literacy as social practice. Provides students with multiple opportunities to share their thinking with each other in a supportive community of learners.

CS 461 is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 588 | INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CURRICULUM STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Independent Study in Curriculum Studies.

CS 589 | THESIS RESEARCH IN CURRICULUM STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A student writing a thesis registers for this course for four quarter hours of credit. Where the thesis research and the writing of the thesis itself are prolonged beyond the usual time, the program advisor may require the student to register for additional credit.

SCG 410 and CS 580 are prerequisites for this class.

CS 591 | CURRICULUM THEORIZING: MULTIPLE LENSES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines diverse curriculum discourses, historical as well as contemporary, within a broader context of issues related to education and schooling. It is designed to engage students critically in the study of curricular frameworks, their assumptions, values, and implications for education, schooling, teaching and learning. Major topics include frameworks for defining and conceptualizing curriculum and curricular visions; social, political, and historical contexts of curriculum construction; issues of gender, race, class, and the media; and the curriculum as socially constructed and historically contextualized discourse(s) about what is and what should be taught. Particular content areas will be used as examples.

CS 600 | REGISTERED STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is open to students who are not registered for any other courses but need to complete requirements/assignments for previously taken courses. It provides access to University facilities. Permission of advisor required. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 606 | REVIEW OF LITERATURE | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Review of Literature. This paper will give students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate written competence in a subfield of their disciplines and to enhance life-long learning. Specifically, they will broaden their knowledge base and inform themselves about a topic, issue, theory, etc., reviewing and synthesizing existing literature. To do so, students will need a variety of bibliographic skills including searching data bases. (See the student handbook for additional information about completing Master's papers.) (0 credit hours)

CS 607 | INTEGRATIVE PAPER | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Integrative Paper. Non-credit. Students will observe and/or participate in the reciprocal interaction of theory and practice, by investigating actual practice in the field as it relates to theory. This might take the form of investigating how a particular theory is applied in the field, developing a practical application of a theory, or, conversely, developing/refining a theory based on investigations made in the field. (See the student handbook for additional information about completing Master's papers.) (0 credit hours)

CS 608 | CAPSTONE IN CURRICULUM STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students who have completed the majority of the Curriculum Studies coursework will engage in a thorough analysis of a school or other educational institution (e.g., museum, community organization) and develop an action plan for: professional development; mentoring and inducting new teachers; teacher evaluation and training; instructional coaching; curriculum development, assessment, or alignment; using assessments or other data to improve student learning; or building collaboration with teachers and stakeholders. Students will gather and analyze demographic, financial and testing data, develop a narrative to tell the story of a school's (or educational institution's) history and recent past, capture the school by way of photographs and interviews, and collect documents or other pertinent artifacts to support their action plan.

CS 625 | CANDIDACY CULMINATING PROJECT (STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING) | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing culminating projects for their program of study, including theses, papers, and final portfolios. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. Registration limited to three terms. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 700 | REGISTERED DOCTORAL STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This registration is required of all doctoral students who are not enrolled in a doctoral course, but are completing course requirements and/or dissertation research. It provides access to University facilities. Academic advisor approval required. After the third enrollment, dissertation chair approval required. (0 credit hours)

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 704 | CURRICULUM DISCOURSES/PERSPECTIVES OVER TIME | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on the examination of the ways in which curriculum - both pK-12 and college/university curriculum - has developed over time. It looks at changes in how curriculum has been defined and conceptualized, theoretical and philosophical developments, evolving assumptions and values, and implications for teaching and learning across varied historical and social contexts. Readings include primary texts by major theorists as well as secondary material including commentary and critique. A primary goal of the course is to provide students with an overview of major movements in curriculum history as a foundation for further study.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 706 | CANDIDACY PAPER | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing a dissertation. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. This registration indicates that a student has successfully completed the candidacy paper as specified in the Doctoral Student Handbook. (0 credit hours)

Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 751 | CURRICULUM FOR HUMAN AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on the relationships between schools and the communities they serve. Specifically, it focuses on how pk-12 schools as well as colleges/universities can and cannot promote human development (healthy growth, learning, and maturation) and community development (creating healthy, safe, connected, & politically-enfranchised communities). The course explores contemporary models of educational reform and community development, notably: project- and community-based learning, asset-based development, participatory action research (PAR), full-service community schools, and university-assisted community schools. Additional topics may include: Explicit and implicit goals of educational reforms and how these (re-)shape civic and democratic opportunities; how universities, schools, and communities can collaborate on individual and community development; and the benefits and liabilities of hybrid educational improvement/community development projects (e.g., Promise Neighborhoods/Promise Zones, the Harlem Children's Zone, etc.)

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 754 | CURRICULUM THEORIZING: MULTIPLE LENSES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Curriculum Theorizing: Multiple Lenses. This course examines diverse curriculum discourses, historical as well as contemporary, within a broader context of issues related to education and schooling. It is designed to engage students critically in the study of curricular frameworks, their assumptions, values, and implications for education, schooling, teaching and learning. Major topics include: frameworks for defining and conceptualizing curriculum and curricular visions; social, political, and historical contexts of curriculum construction; issues of gender, race, class ableness, and the media; the curriculum as socially constructed, and historically contextualized discourse(s) about what is and what should be taught. Particular content areas will be used as examples.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 761 | ASSESSING SCHOOL CURRICULUM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course develops a framework for assessing the content, characteristics, and outcomes of the curriculum in a school. The framework will include the collection, organization and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative measures of effective instruction. Particular attention will be given to local, state, and national standards for content, teaching and outcomes. Attention will also be given to the qualities of the lived experiences of students in school and thus to the unintended as well as intended outcomes of schooling. Each student will be expected to begin assessing the curriculum in his or her school and to outline a proposal for a more complete assessment of the school's curriculum.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 764 | YOUTH DEVELOPMENT,IDEOLOGY, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the ideological significance of "youth," youth development, and education in societies characterized by structural inequalities based on class, race, ethnicity, and sexual/gendered relations of domination and subordination. Texts from a range of academic disciplines -- psychology, sociology, cultural studies, social work -- are studied to show the influence these perspectives have had in shaping discourse about youth, youth development, and education as a vehicle for social reproduction and social change. Youth and education are looked at as the locus of arguments about social crises and social change and the impacts of framing social problems as educational and youth problems are explored.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 774 | ENGAGING IN CURRICULUM DELIBERATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course engages students in systematic and collaborative deliberation on curriculum problems. A pattern for deliberation -- including situation analysis, problem discrimination and formulation, development of alternative courses of action, and anticipation of consequences -- will be developed, exemplified, and contrasted with other descriptions of curriculum development. The importance and role of alternative conceptions of learners, of situation, and of knowledge structures within disciplines will be emphasized. After engaging in stimulated deliberations, each student will be asked to examine the intellectual commitments underlying this approach to curriculum change, to reconsider his or her role as a curriculum leader in a school or other educational setting, and to develop realistic plans for engaging a particular school community in collaborative curriculum deliberation.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 784 | CURRICULUM AND PROGRAM DESIGN | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course studies principles underlying the design of effective, coherent, and comprehensive instructional programs. Topics include: the design and organization of core courses of study and related curricular components; the associated staff development program; and alignment with local, state, and national mandates. Particular attention will be given to planning for diversity, including differences in learning styles, special needs, culture and language.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 794 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN CURRICULUM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In order to assure that the program remains flexible, responsive to the needs of students, and inclusive of the areas of interest of both faculty and students, this variable topics course will provide an opportunity for critical examination of compelling topical issues related to education. Topics could include: issues in educational reform; special education; controversies in curricular discourse; current issues such as the education of homeless children; or legal and constitutional issues in education and schooling. The course will be conducted in a seminar format.

Status as an EDD or EdS student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 849 | SUPERVISED DISSERTATION (PHD) PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertation proposals. Permission of dissertation chair required.

CS 859 | INDEPENDENT DISSERTATION RESEARCH (PHD): CURRICULUM STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertations. Permission of dissertation chair required.

CS 889 | SUPERVISED APPLIED CAPSTONE (EDD) PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their capstone proposals. Permission of capstone chair required.

CS 899 | INDEPENDENT APPLIED CAPSTONE (EDD): CURRICULUM STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their capstone projects. Permission of capstone chair required.