History (HST)

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HST 111 | THE WORLD TO C.1500 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the phenomenon of civilization as experienced by West Asian, South Asian, East Asian, African, European, and Pre-Columbian American societies to 1500 A.D. Formerly HST 218.

HST 112 | THE WORLD, C.1500-1914 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

For most of human history, people lived in groups whose cultures, faiths, economies and politics scarcely affected, or were even known to, other peoples. Then, beginning in the 13th Century C.E., this began to change. Slowly at first, and then ever-faster, all of the world's peoples became part of a single world civilization, whether they liked it or not. By about 1914, there was only one world civilization, with local variants. How and why did this happen? Who benefitted, and who did not, from this momentous change? This course seeks to answer these questions as we look at the world's civilizations and at the forces and events that drove them together.

HST 113 | THE WORLD, 1900-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

More change -- political, economic, social, technological -- occurred in the 20th Century than in all the previous years of human history combined. The world at end of the century, in 2001, was nothing like the world that our great-great-grandparents were born into just 100 years before. And, unlike previous eras, what happened on one place impacted everyone everywhere on earth. Why and how did such vast changes occur, and why did they happen so quickly? These are some of the themes that History 113 will address.

HST 121 | LATIN AMERICA TO 1765: LIFE BEFORE AND AFTER COLUMBUS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of Latin American history that offers a continental approach to the colonial period. Special attention is given to Native American societies before 1492, to the Spanish conquest of Mexico and Peru, to the trade in African slaves (Spanish and Portuguese colonies), and to issues of race, class, and gender during the colonial period.

HST 122 | LATIN AMERICA, 1765-1914 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

One of the main goals of this course is for students to determine whether the long 19th century was an era of revolution and social change or a continuation of colonial institutions and policies. To address this broad question, the course focuses on the Bourbon Reforms, the Wars of Independence, the problems associated with nation building, and the neo-colonial order. Through the analysis of some individual countries (for example Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil) students will study key issues like slavery, the "India question," race relations, class formation, social inequalities, authoritarianism, Church-State relations, liberalism, subaltern resistance, and North-South relations.

HST 123 | LATIN AMERICA, 1914-2010 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with a basic and general knowledge of Latin American history from the 1910s to the present. The course highlights the challenges and failures the new republics faced. Due to the diverse historical experiences, cultures, and economic and political systems, the course will focus on the main social, political, and economic issues that shaped Latin America during the 20th century (democracy, social revolution, social justice, political violence, and repression).

HST 131 | AFRICA TO 1800 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of African history from earliest times, concentrating on the political, social and religious aspects of major African states and empires. Formerly HST 227.

HST 132 | AFRICA, 1750-1900 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Age of Conquest. The origins of Afro-European relations and the political, economic and military causes of the European partition and occupation of the continent. Formerly HST 228.

HST 133 | AFRICA, 1900-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The workings of the colonial system, the rise and course of independence movements, and the history of individual African states since independence. Formerly HST 229.

HST 141 | THE MUSLIM WORLD, C. 600 CE TO 1100 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Foundation of First Global Civilization (600-1100). A study of the emergence of Islam and the growth of the Islamic community from the time of the Prophet Muhammad until the end of the eleventh century. Formerly HST 223.

HST 142 | THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1000-1500 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Sultans, Khans and Shaykhs: Medieval Islamic History (1000-1500). A survey of Muslim history from the decline of the Arab caliphate to the rise of the great gunpowder empires, addressing themes of political expansion, military slavery, devastation brought about by the twin plagues of the Mongols and the Black Death, and the growth of Islamic mysticism. Formerly HST 224.

HST 143 | THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1400-1920 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Great Empires (1400-1920). Examines the social, cultural and economic histories of the Ottoman-Turkish, Safavid Iranian and Mughal-Indian empires which dominated the Muslim world in the crucial centuries between the end of the Mongol empire and the advent of European dominance. Formerly HST 225.

HST 151 | INDIA TO 900 - FROM THE STONE AGE TO THE GOLDEN AGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course follows the development of the history of the region from the earliest phases of human settlement, the first civilization in the Indus valley, and the formation of the Mauryan and Gupta empires. It will analyze the growth of different state structures from tribal/lineage based state to these great empires. It incorporates the rise of regional states and the growing importance of trade to linking South Asia with the West. It will also examine the development of different religious traditions from Vedic Brahmanism to Buddhism to Jainism and the very early days of Islam in the region. The central question of this course will be how to contextualize the relationship between structures like family, law, caste, community, state and the tumultuous changes in the subcontinent over this long period. Formerly HST 256.

HST 152 | INDIA FROM 900-1750 - SULTANS, MUGHALS, AND ISLAMIC EMPIRES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course begins with the transformation of society from the 'ancient' to the 'medieval', and compares this to developments in Europe in the feudal age. It then incorporates specific political, social, and cultural developments in South Asia that came about with the establishment of powerful Islamic states in a region where Muslims were a minority. These issues will inform the analysis of the Ghaznavid and Ghurid invasions, the Delhi Sultanate, the Vijayanagara empire and the Mughal empire. The course will end with the Marathas and the decline of the Mughal empire, and the rising influence of the British. The central themes concern how the state, economy, culture, and society developed in the period when Islam became firmly embedded in South Asia.

HST 153 | INDIA FROM 1700-1950 - RISE AND FALL OF THE BRITISH RAJ | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course begins with the decline of the Mughal Empire, and then moves to examine the British empire, the nationalist movement and finally to independence and partition in 1947. The central questions of this course continue to be relevant in the post-colonial period: how we understand the distinctive form of modernity that has developed in South Asia. Taking a comparative approach as often as possible, the course examines the fundamental ways that Britain was as transformed by the development of its empire as was colonial India. The course constantly deconstructs easy binaries of self and others/ East and West by examining the differences within Indian and British society. Formerly HST 257.

HST 161 | EAST ASIA TO C. 1200 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Outlines the history of the region (China, Korea and Japan) during the period of antiquity. Follows the development and the formation of dynastic rule in China and Korea and the imperial institution in Japan. Assesses the extent of the role of ancient Chinese philosophy, language, and statecraft in establishing a coherent region we now call "East Asia.

HST 162 | EAST ASIA c. 1200 TO 1800 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Begins with the transition of East Asia (China, Korea and Japan) from ancient to medieval society and compares it to developments in Europe during the feudal age. Explores the political, economic and cultural relations between the various states in the region as a whole as well as the specific local developments of state and society during this period. Examines the arrival of the first Europeans, traders and then Jesuit and Catholic missionaries, and the resulting radical social realignment within each society stemming from this encounter with the 'outside.'.

HST 163 | EAST ASIA , c.1800-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Begins with the reshaping of East Asian relations from the late 18th century following the realignment of the region after the expulsion of European Catholic missionaries. Follows the radical shift in the relations between these countries as they all sought to respond to the imperial challenges that the West imposed. Explores the central role of Japan and its effort to build an empire in and beyond East Asia from the late 19th century through its defeat in World War II and the lasting historical legacy of that history in the region.

HST 171 | EUROPE, 400-1400 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The important components of European society during the Middle Ages, including rulers, knights, and peasants, churchmen and nuns, urban merchants, intellectuals, and artisans. Who were these Medieval people, what differentiated them, how did they interact with each other, and how and why did these interactions change over time? Formerly HST 210.

HST 172 | EUROPE, 1348-1789 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The development of new European ideologies in a time of heightened political and social conflict, from the rebirth of ancient culture in Renaissance Italy, to the religious debates of the Protestant Reformation; from the theories of absolute monarchy to the early revolutionary ideologies of the Enlightenment. Formerly HST 211.

HST 173 | EUROPE, 1789-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of European history from 1789 to the present. Formerly HST 217.

HST 181 | UNITED STATES TO 1800 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. history from the earliest European settlements to the aftermath of the Revolution. Formerly HST 280.

HST 182 | UNITED STATES, 1800-1900 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. history from the aftermath of the Revolution to the Spanish-American War. Formerly HST 281.

HST 183 | UNITED STATES, 1900-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. history from the Progressive era to the present. Formerly HST 282.

HST 185 | AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide an overview of American History designed to provide a one-quarter overview of American history and culture. It will provide an overview of the central themes of American History from the colonial period to the present with a focus on social, popular, and cultural history. Cross-listed with AMS 200.

HST 200 | MEXICO AFTER INDEPENDENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This survey covers the history of Mexico from 1821 to the present. It will examine the difficulties of nation-building during the 19th Century, the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940), and the success and failure of the "Mexican Miracle.

HST 202 | JEWISH EXPERIENCES IN THE AMERICAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is about Jewish History in the Americas from 1492 until the late 1800s. It combines colonial/national periods and covers different regions, including North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.

HST 204 | FILM AND LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An inquiry into the way film portrays historical events in Latin America.

HST 206 | MEXICO: FROM THE OLMECS TO INDEPENDENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys the history of Mexico from the rise of the Olmec Civilization to Mexican Independence in 1821. It will examine the rise, fall, and continuities of Mesoamerican civilizations, the Spanish conquest, and the creation of the colonial order.

HST 208 | IMPERIAL RUSSIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Russia from the time of Peter the Great in the early 18th century to the collapse of tsarism in 1917. Topics include Westernization and resistance during the reigns of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; reform and reaction under Alexander I and Nicholas I; Alexander II and the great reforms of the 1860's; industrialization and the transformation of Russian society in the second half of the nineteenth century; the rise of radicalism and emergence of revolutionary movements; and the revolutions of 1905 and February 1917.

HST 209 | THE RISE AND FALL OF THE SOVIET UNION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in twentieth-century Russia from the collapse of tsarist rule through the fall of communism. Topics include the rise of Bolshevism and the October Revolution; the Civil War and allied intervention; the period of NEP and "revolutionary dreaming"; Stalin and Stalinism; the Great Patriotic War; Khrushchev and the "thaw"; Brezhnev and "developed socialism"; and the rise and fall of Mikhail Gorbachev.

HST 211 | THE ART OF CRUSADING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the Crusades. More specifically, it focuses on the world within which the Crusades were born and the Levantine kingdom built as a result of their initial success. Our study will depend on primary artistic, literary, and archaeological materials, as well as the secondary scholarship that has identified and interpreted these materials. Our understanding of this historical moment will be nuanced by the questions we ask of both. The payoff will be an appreciation for the religious, social, political, and artistic forces that defined the twelfth and thirteen centuries in Europe and in the Mediterranean basin, leading as they did to such fascinating phenomena as pilgrimage, the cult of relics, chivalry, holy war, the rise of military orders, and the establishment of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem itself. Cross-listed with HAA 233.

HST 212 | MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE WOMEN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Gender roles and ideologies in pre-modern and early modern Europe, from ancient Mediterranean and Germanic women to high Medieval ladies, nuns, serfs, and city women, from early feminism to the restrictions and opportunities brought by the Renaissance and Reformation. Emphasis on primary sources, especially women's writings.

HST 213 | MEDIEVAL MYSTICS IN EUROPE: 1000-1600 AD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The evolution over time of theories and experiences of human union with God, and of varied Christian spiritual paths and practices, as described in mystical literature, saints' lives, religious art, and music. Emphasis on the monastic, urban, and courtly institutional contexts of the documents. Cross-listed as CTH 228.

HST 214 | EASTERN EUROPE TO 1699 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of the area's settlements by Slavic and non-Slavic peoples, the establishment of medieval states, the East European Renaissance and Reformation, the struggle of Cross and Crescent, and the growth of Habsburg and Ottoman power.

HST 215 | EASTERN EUROPE: 1699 TO 1914 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of the East European Enlightenment and absolutism, the Polish Partitions, and the effects of revolutionary ideas on multinational empires.

HST 216 | EASTERN EUROPE: 1914-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of World War I and its effects in Eastern Europe; the rise of nation-states; the destruction of traditional agrarian societies; the impact of World War II; and the establishment and decline of Communist regimes.

HST 217 | THE VIKINGS: MEDIEVAL AMBASSADORS OF TERROR, TRADE AND MULTICULTURALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to the history of the Vikings, from early Viking society in Scandinavia to the 'Norseman' Invasion of England in 1066. This course pays particular attention to what the Vikings had to say about themselves as well as to their interaction with other peoples, from North America to the Holy Roman and Byzantine Empires to the Muslim world.

HST 218 | CATHOLIC EXPERIENCE I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to the history of the Catholic Church and the evolution of Christian thought and practices, from the early Church to the thirteenth century. The course will include not only institutional history but also ecclesiastical, cultural, and social history of Catholicism in relation to foundational theological and spiritual texts written in this period. Main topics: The Early Church; Councils and Heresies; Missions in Northern Europe; Charlemagne, Carolingians and a new Roman Empire; Monasticism; Eastern Orthodoxy; Christianity and Islam (the Age of the Crusades); the Mystical Tradition; the Investiture Controversy. Cross-listed with CTH 220.

HST 219 | CATHOLIC EXPERIENCE II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an overview of the history of Catholicism and its interactions with institutional, political, and social history from 1200 to the French Revolution. The main topics of the class are the origin of the Universities and Scholasticism; Mendicant Orders and their impact on the Medieval Society; the Challenges to Papal Monarchy; Humanism and Erasmus; the impact of the Age of the Reformation; the Council of Trent; the geographic discoveries and the New Worlds; the Enlightenment and the Scientific Revolution; the Catholic Church and the French Revolution. Cross-listed with CTH 221.

HST 220 | CATHOLIC EXPERIENCE III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will offer a survey of the political, cultural and intellectual history of the Catholic Church from 1789 through the early twenty-first century. It will include discussions of the Catholic Church in relation to the French Revolution; the Catholic Church and the formation of modern nation-states (including, inter alia, the unification of Italy and the German Kulturkampf); the relation between the Church and Liberalism; intellectual movements like theological Modernism and ressourcement theology; the First Vatican Council; the Church, Fascism and Communism; the Second Vatican Council; the Emergence of a Global Church, Latin American Liberation Theology, and more. Cross-listed with CTH 222.

HST 221 | EARLY RUSSIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Russia from the emergence of the Kievan state in the ninth century to the reign of Peter the Great in the early eighteenth century. Topics include the rise and fall of Kiev; the Mongol invasion and rule by the "Golden Horde;" the rise of Moscow and unification of Great Russia; the consolidation of tsarist authority and the reign of Ivan the Terrible; the Time of Troubles; and the early Romanov dynasty.

HST 222 | MODERN GERMANY, 1870-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Following the path from Germany's unification in the late 19th century via two world wars, the country's division in the course of the Cold War, and ultimately the country's reunification at the close of the 20th century, one of the goals of this course is to introduce students to the major cornerstones of modern German history. Another objective, however, aims at using these events in the exploration of shifting ideas about what it has meant to be German, exploring what factors determined inclusion in or exclusion from the German community.

HST 226 | ISLAM AND THE WEST: A SURVEY OF ORIENTALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

From "heresy" to "the Green Threat," this course studies the changing perceptions of Islam and the Islamic world held by those in "Western" societies from the time of the Crusades down to the contemporary era.

HST 232 | CULTURE AND POLITICS IN IMPERIAL CHINA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the history of Chinese civilization from the early Shang kingship through the development of the Chinese Empire (221 B.C. - A.D. 1911). We will focus on systematic changes in political, economic, and social structures in China and the intellectual and cultural forms that each configuration produced. Topics include the growth of the Chinese empire, Chinese forms of Buddhism, and the development of Chinese philosophy, scholarship and literature.

HST 233 | THE RISE OF MODERN CHINA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the history of Chinese civilization from the 18th century to the present. We will survey the height of the authority of the Qing Imperial government, its dissolution in the 19th century, and the creation of a revolutionary China in the 20th century. Topics include the Opium War and China's foreign relations, the introduction of Westernized technology and education, and the rise of Communism under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Also considers the ways in which our contemporary understanding of China is formed by recent developments in the media - Chinese news and film.

HST 234 | AUTHORS, IDEAS, AND EXPRESSION FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course entails close reading and discussion of significant texts in Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Readings will reflect different genres and perspectives. Potential authors may include, for example, Machiavelli, Erasmus, Pisan, Luther, Teresa of Avila, Cervantes, Montaigne, Descartes, Locke, Voltaire, Wollstonecraft, Swift, Equiano, and Rousseau. Cross-listed with CPL 211.

HST 235 | EUROPEAN EXPANSION: AGE OF DISCOVERY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of the political, intellectual and scientific roots of the expansion of Europe and of the main voyages of discovery between 1400 and 1825.

HST 236 | A WORLD OF EMPIRES: 1400-2000 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Most people equate 'empire' with Europe, and see the European empires of the 18th-20th centuries as both unique and inevitable. In fact, empires dominated much of the world for the past 600 years and not all of them were European. This course looks at these empires, European and non-European and asks: how and why were empires created? How did they help shape the world we live in today? Why do empires, which seem to be so powerful and immortal, fall, and why do they often do so with stunning speed? Our study will include such things as history, technology, culture, war, economics, and most especially the people who created, sustained and finally overthrew empires. Through this, we will understand how the world of today, a legacy of empires, came to be.

HST 237 | HISTORY OF THE CITY OF ROME | 4-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the history of urban Rome from antiquity through the modern age.

HST 238 | WITCHCRAFT IN THE WESTERN WORLD: GENDER, CULTURE, AND THE LAW | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores witchcraft in Western history, emphasizing the intense witch-hunting during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Europe and European colonies. Connections between witchcraft and other contemporary developments--including the Renaissance, Reformation, the scientific revolution, and imperialism--are examined alongside pertinent issues in the history of gender and sexuality.

HST 239 | WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE, 1800-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore the diversity of women's and girls' experiences across Europe as they negotiate between public and private spheres, daily life and great events, Europe and the world. Themes may include industrialization, suffrage, imperialism, "new women," fascism, and communism.

HST 240 | HISTORY OF CHICAGO | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A history of the founding and development of Chicago from a frontier village to a major industrial, commercial and cultural center. This course will focus on the changing lives of ordinary Chicagoans. Cross-listed with AMS 240 and GEO 231.

HST 241 | WORLD REFUGEE CRISIS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a survey of global refugee crisis and internal displacement between 1945 and the present. The course will focus on the following issues and challenges: human rights, definitions and causes of crisis, internal/external displacements, 'environmental' refugees, protection and integration, refugee children, and conflict resolutions in post-war societies.

HST 242 | HISTORY OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN EUROPE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore the evolution and implications of the idea that all human beings possess the same "inalienable rights." Topics will include human rights advocates, their strategies and arguments, and how human rights claims have evolved and intersected with political, institutional, and legal structures since the eighteenth century.

HST 243 | HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U.S. | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course traces the development of the Catholic Church from a missionary enterprise to the position of a major social, political, and economic institution. The course will examine the manner in which the hierarchical institution of the Catholic Church has related to the liberal ideal of American democracy.

HST 246 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1800 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course primarily focuses on the colonial era with an emphasis on topics such as the construction of race and gender, the Black Atlantic, the emergence of African diasporic cultures in the Americas, slavery, black political thought, resistance, and the Revolutionary War. Cross Listed with ABD 256.

HST 247 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1800-1900 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The African experience in America is expansive, beginning in the colonial era and lasting through the present day. This course will focus on a portion of that history-that spanning the 19th century. The course is organized thematically, with an emphasis on topics such as resistance, the construction of race, slavery and the law, gender and slavery, the nature of antebellum free black life, abolition, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Cross Listed with ABD 257.

HST 248 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1900 TO PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The African experience in America is expansive, beginning in the colonial era and lasting through the present day. This course will focus on only a portion of that history-1900 to the present. This course is organized thematically with an emphasis on topics such as migration, urbanization, segregation, 20th century constructions of blackness, arts & culture, African Americans and the World Wars, black political thought, freedom movements, and criminalization. Cross Listed with ABD 258.

HST 249 | ORIGINS OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR, 1871-1917 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the development of the European (and Great Power imperial) state system after the unification of Germany; the formation (and global implications) of the pre-war alliance structure; the political and social movements of nationalism, imperialism, and militarism; the naval race; and the July Crisis of 1914.

HST 250 | ORIGINS OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR, 1914 - 1941 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the European (and world) state system in the aftermath of the First World War and the Russian Revolution; the attempts to forge a new international equilibrium at the Paris Peace Conference and after; the rise of Hitler and Nazism; appeasement; the immediate origins of the Second World War in Europe; and the rise of militarism and advent of war in East Asia.

HST 251 | ORIGINS OF THE COLD WAR, 1917 - 1953 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the rise of the United States as a world power; the diplomatic significance of the Russian Revolution; the wartime alliance between Great Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union; the collapse of the international order in the aftermath of the Second World War; and the advent of the Cold War.

HST 252 | THE AGE OF THE COLD WAR: 1945-1991 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The origins, nature and progress of the Cold War from the end of World War II until the collapse of the Soviet Union.

HST 253 | HISTORY OF THE MODERN OLYMPICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the Modern Olympics: the oldest and most inclusive institutionalized effort to engender international exchange and perpetuate peacefulness through athletic excellence. Relying on a mix of primary and secondary sources, the course will touch on an array of important issues, including globalization, race relations, gender issues, the rise of popular culture, and terrorism.

HST 254 | AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An overview, examining American urban life from the early days of the colonial seaport, through the rise of the smoky industrial center, to today's troubled "dual city" of the rich and the poor. Throughout the course, we will focus on how urbanization affected the lives of the diverse peoples who experienced it. We will also explore the ways in which city life contributed to changes in American culture, and to a greater acceptance of social and cultural diversity.

HST 255 | THE HISTORY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Great War created the modern world. This course will discuss the major theatres of the war, the range of combatants, the effect of the war on homefronts and civil societies, changes to military technologies, and consequences of the war. This course will provide an introduction to the Great War and its ramifications for students unfamiliar with it.

HST 256 | AXIS AND ALLIES: THE SECOND WORLD WAR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The second world war was the most destructive conflict in world history. Its scope was global and its impact was felt by millions people throughout the world. This course will examine the nature of the wartime experience for the combatants and civilians, how the war was waged by different societies and their governments, and the impact of the conflict on the post-war world.

HST 258 | WOMEN IN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A comparative study of women's social, cultural, political, economic roles over time in three parts of the world.

HST 259 | HISTORY OF WESTERN SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of scientific thought and discovery from the ancient Greeks to the early 20th century.

HST 260 | LESBIAN AND GAY AMERICAN HISTORY, COLONIAL TO 1970 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) history in America from the colonial era to the Stonewall Riots. Through primary and secondary source readings and class discussion we will examine how understandings of same-sex sex and sexuality have been constructed in the past. Special attention is paid to readings that draw revealing connections between same-sex sexuality and race, class, and gender.

HST 261 | CATHOLICISM IN WORLD HISTORY I: JESUS TO 1500 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of the development of the Catholic Church from the time of Jesus to the Renaissance. Religious movements, piety and art as well as theology and ecclesiastical history will be examined. Cross-listed as REL 213 and CTH 205.

HST 262 | CATHOLICISM IN WORLD HISTORY II: 1500 - PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of the development of Catholicism since 1500 exploring the Catholic Reformation, Catholicism's encounter with the Enlightenment, the missionary movement and the Catholic Church in the United States. Cross-listed as REL 214 and CTH 206.

HST 263 | JAPAN TO C. 1200 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Follows the formation of a unified state in central Japan during the 5th and 6th centuries. Considers the influence of Korean immigrants and Chinese philosophy and statecraft on the unification of Japan in early antiquity. Explores rise of Japan's aristocratic court culture in Nara and Kyoto as well as powerful Buddhist institutions and the emergence of the warrior class in Eastern Japan. Formerly HST 230.

HST 264 | JAPAN c.1200 - 1800 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Follows the emergence of the warrior class and the system of dual political authority until the 14th century, with the imperial court in Kyoto and the samurai elite in Kamakura. Continues with an examination of the early modern processes of urbanization and the growth of a monetary economy, changes in social organization, major cultural innovations, and religious/intellectual movements.

HST 265 | JAPAN, c. 1800-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Follows the radical transformation of Japanese politics, society, and economy with the commercialization of the countryside, the weakening of samurai rule, and increased, often hostile, contact with Western imperialist nations. Explores expansion of Japan as an imperialist nation from the middle of the 19th century and the lasting legacy of that expansion in the region. Explores WWII and postwar political, economic, social changes in contemporary Japan.

HST 266 | IRELAND, 1450 - 1800, CONQUEST, COLONIZATION & REBELLION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course offers a survey of Irish history from the end of the middle ages to the union of Ireland and Great Britain in 1800. It traces the ways in which Ireland was brought under great English (later British) control through processes of agreement, conquest and colonization; and the ways in which various groups within Ireland sought to resist such developments.

HST 268 | IRELAND, 1800-PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Survey of Irish history from 1800 to 2000. Examines the course of Irish history from the Act of Union (creating the United Kingdom), through the struggles and reforms of the 19th century (Catholic Emancipation, the Famine and Irish diaspora, Fenianism, Land Reform and Home Rule), to the creation of the modern nation-state of the 20th century (the Easter Rising, partition and civil war, the role of Eamon deValera, the Republic, and the Troubles). Topics include the contributions of Irish culture and its influence in Europe and the world.

HST 269 | MUSEUMS, MATERIAL CULTURE AND MEMORY: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How is the past remembered in public venues like museums? How do history museums shape how we understand past? How do historians use material culture (objects like coins or folk art) to interpret the past for the public? Public history refers to history that you find in public spaces-- outside of the pages of academic journals, and beyond university walls. We encounter examples of public history through exhibits, performances, walking tours, visits to historic sites, the world wide web, etc. This course familiarizes you with examples of public history, and trains you to critically analyze and thoughtfully engage with public historical interpretations.

HST 270 | U.S. HISTORICAL LANDSCAPE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course considers how the American landscape has been shaped by native occupants, and later, by agricultural settlement and industrial development. A key theme is how culture has shaped the physical world we inhabit, from 1500 to circa 1950.

HST 271 | OLD REGIME AND REVOLUTIONARY FRANCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides students with a firm foundation in the history of early modern France, ca. 1500-1800, including major developments of the period and an understanding of the relationship between the French revolution and the period that preceded it. Topics will include (among others) the rise of absolutist monarchy, the Enlightenment, French colonialism, pre-revolutionary social and economic conditions, and the French Revolution.

HST 272 | FASCISM AND COUNTER REVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What is Fascism? How and why did this early 20th century political movement and ideology that openly preached racial hatred, genocide, and the necessity of war attract so many millions of followers all over the world? What exactly did Fascists believe? These are some of the issues that this course addresses. We will explore the development of fascism during the 1920s and 1930s both as a philosophy and as a form of political action. The course examines Fascism's opponents -- socialism and democracy -- and looks at how supporters of these ideologies responded to the Fascist challenge. And we will consider what the possible responses to Fascism are, and whether or not Fascism still exists, even in the United States.

HST 273 | HISTORY OF SEXUALITY IN EUROPE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore key ideas, practices and patterns across multiple European societies from the French Revolution until the present. Key topics may include demographics, identities, sexology, and sexual consumerism.

HST 274 | INTELLIGENCE IN 20TH CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of intelligence gathering and analysis in the twentieth century (and beyond). This course will address the role intelligence played in the politics, diplomacy, and strategy of the leading world powers. Special consideration will be given to the eras of the two world wars, the cold war, and the emerging nations in the post-war period. The course is comparative in nature and will examine the intelligence communities of the United States, the European powers, the Soviet Union, Japan, China, and Israel.

HST 275 | SEX IN AMERICA, PURITANS TO VICTORIANS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys the history of three centuries of American ideas about sex and sexuality. By focusing on sexual variation from the era of colonial settlement through the end of the nineteenth century, this course will challenge conventional interpretations of sex in early America.

HST 276 | SEX IN AMERICA, LATE VICTORIANS TO PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide an overview of the history of American sexuality from the late 19th century through the present. The course will draw from social and cultural history, the history of medicine and psychology, legal and political history, literature, mass media, and gender studies in order to understand the creation of modern sexual identities.

HST 277 | WAR AND PEACE IN THE MODERN AGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of military history from 1648 to the present with emphasis on the relationship between armed forces and the societies that create them, the impact of technology on warfare, and efforts to limit deadly conflict.

HST 278 | HISTORY OF AMERICAN RELIGION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of major religious traditions, movements, and themes in American history from the colonial period to the present, including the relationship between religious values and beliefs and other aspects of American culture.

HST 279 | WESTWARD EXPANSION IN U.S. | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the competition among Native American nations, European empires, and the emerging governments of the United States and Mexico to control the North American region from roughly the Appalachian Mountains to the Pacific Ocean from approximately 1775 to 1890. The class will examine environmental changes, military campaigns, trade links, settlement patterns, and government policies.

HST 280 | HISTORY OF US NATIONAL PARKS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

At its core, this course examines the intersection of American history and the natural world, following a classic definition of environmental history as the interaction between humans and the environment in the past. Specifically, this course examines the historical development of America's national parks, analyzing how a truly American idea of national parks as idealized nature?what Wallace Stegner once called "America's best idea"?led to preservation efforts all over the country and throughout time. In addition to studying the historical development of national parks, this course will also use national parks as lens for studying important themes in American history. Like microhistory, national park history allows historians to "ask large questions in small places." This course asks large questions in green places. This course examines some important themes in American history, including: assessing the idea of American exceptionalism (including nationalism and imperialism, but also American anxiety), changing definitions of economic progress, the rise of federal political power, the development of identity (including American identity, gender, ethnic, race, etc), and American conceptions of the environmental world. Cross-listed with ENV 165.

HST 281 | IDEAS OF NATURE IN US HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course scrutinizes different conceptions of nature throughout a broad span of Western history, and includes an examination of diverse ideas that include pre-contact Native American conceptions of their environments, colonial-era attitudes toward the dwindling resources of Europe and the vast potential of the North American continent, 19th century movements such as Romanticism, Transcendentalism, acclimatization, conservation, and preservation, and 20th century ideas concerning wilderness preservation, Deep Ecology, and restoration. At heart, this course is designed as an intellectual history of nature. This class concentrates on the ideas of seminal thinkers concerned with the natural world, and examine how these men and women impacted history through their beliefs and philosophies, through their written works, through art, and through modern media such as film and television. Cross-listed with ENV 160.

HST 283 | ASIAN-AMERICAN IMMIGRATION AND HISTORY, 1840-1965 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys Asian American history from the early nineteenth century to 1965. It explores the changing experiences of Asian immigrants and their citizen descendants in the United States within the larger context of immigration and race relations in American history. The course deals with the following broad themes: causes and processes of migration, responses from American society, and experience of immigration.

HST 284 | HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Thematic study of the educational developments in U.S. History.

HST 285 | ANCIENT ROME: AUGUSTUS TO CONSTANTINE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the history of the Roman Empire from its beginnings under Augustus (27 BCE-14 CE) to its reorganization under Diocletian (284-305 CE) and Constantine (306-337 CE). Both textual and archaeological sources will be used to understand political, economic, and social developments.

HST 288 | WOMEN IN UNITED STATES HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The history of women's work, family, and political lives in America.

HST 290 | ANCIENT EGYPT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course traces the developments of Egyptian civilization from its earliest beginnings to the Arab/Muslim conquest. Emphasis will be on assessing material culture with students being introduced to techniques of Egyptian archaeology and papyrology.

HST 291 | ANCIENT WORLD HISTORY: MESOPOTAMIA AND THE FERTILE CRESCENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analyzes the early civilizations in the Fertile Crescent through an examination of material culture. Attention will also be given to the archaeology and archaeological methods of the Near East including Jericho and Catalhoyuk.

HST 292 | KINGS, CASTLES AND CATHEDRALS: THE WORLD OF MEDIEVAL ENGLAND | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of cultural, social, economic, and constitutional developments in England from the Norman Conquest to the Glorious Revolution.

HST 293 | ISLAND AND EMPIRE: MODERN BRITAIN SINCE 1688 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A social, economic, cultural, and political survey of modern Britain and the British Empire. Topics covered will include the industrial revolution, the class system, the constitution, colonial expansion, and English literature. The course will situate the history of modern Britain within the context of European and world civilizations.

HST 294 | ANCIENT GREECE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Traces the development of Greek civilization through an examination of material culture. Emphasis will be on the major monuments and artifacts of the Greek world from prehistory to the Classical Age. Students will also be introduced to techniques and methods of classical archaeology.

HST 295 | AMERICAN HISTORY AND FILM/TV | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines American History and popular media. Depending on the instructor, it may focus on how American History has been depicted in popular media or it may emphasize the history and development of popular media. Contact instructor for syllabus.

HST 296 | ANCIENT ROME: ORIGINS TO THE END OF THE REPUBLIC | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course traces the development of Rome from a small settlement on the banks of the Tiber in the eighth century BCE to a Mediterranean power in the first century BCE. Both textual and archaeological sources will be used to understand political, economic, and social institutions of the Archaic and Republican periods.

HST 297 | IMPERIAL SPAIN, 1469-1808 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analysis of Spain and Spanish empire between 1468-1808. During this period, Spain united and became a leading global power with enormous consequences for Western and world history. Emphasis on the political, economic, socio-cultural history of Iberian society.

HST 298 | INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL SOURCES AND METHODS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the first of two introductory core courses required of all history majors, history minors, and education majors with a concentration in history. In this course, students will learn the varied ways in which scholars interpret the past, focusing particularly on the evidence and arguments used by historians in their work. To that end, students will learn about the varieties of primary sources (textual, material, oral) as well as the varied methods historians use to analyze such evidence. In addition, students will practice analyzing primary source evidence in oral and written presentations, learn how to use the library for historical research, and how to discern scholarly arguments in secondary sources.

(WRD 103 and WRD 104) or HON 100 or HON 101 is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 299 | CRAFT OF HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the second of two introductory core courses required of all history majors, history minors, and education majors with a concentration in history. In this class, students will bring to bear the skills in historical sources and methods learned in HST 298 to complete a substantial independent research project. To that end, students will learn how to identify a historical question or problem about which to conduct research; how to find, obtain, and evaluate primary source evidence to research; how to build a secondary source bibliography using reference works, monographs, and scholarly journal articles; and develop and execute a coherent plan for writing and revising a substantial research paper (of at least 10 pages in length) based on an integrated use of both primary and secondary sources.

A grade of C- or above in HST 298 is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 301 | U.S. LABOR HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore the history of American labor from 1877 to the present. We will particularly focus upon the work of recent American labor historians who examine such themes as the relationship between ethnicity, race, gender, and class; how and why work has changed; the role of unions, families, churches and other working-class institutions in workers' lives; the relationship between working-class cultures and mass cultures; and how capitalism, the state, and workers themselves have shaped class relations.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 302 | MAPS IN HISTORY AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines maps in multiple cultures and the relationship of these to local geographies and perception of place.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 303 | TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in Latin American History.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 306 | COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA: POWER & DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-RACIAL SOCIETY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The multicultural origins of colonial rule in the Americas from the 15th to the early 19th century.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 308 | EUROPE FROM CONFLICT TO CONSENSUS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will examine the emergence of a European identity during the second half of the twentieth century. Special attention will be given to the evolution of the European Union and NATO as representative institutions.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 310 | INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A mostly twentieth-century survey of political relationships between the United States and Latin American nations, emphasizing dependency and interdependence theories.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 311 | THE HISTORY OF THE CARIBBEAN: FROM COLUMBUS TO CASTRO | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The history of the Caribbean from colonial times to the present, with special emphasis on the factors that give each nation its particular character.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 312 | LATINOS IN THE UNITED STATES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of the history, politics, and culture of the major Latino groups in the United States: Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Central Americans. Traces the history of these groups from the 19th century to the present by analyzing their impact on the United States.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 313 | THE OLD SOUTH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Considers the history of the southern states before the Civil War, focusing especially on the growth of southern slavery, the development of African-American culture, the socio-economic features of a slave society, as well as the distinctive political and ideological contours of the region.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 314 | THE CUBAN REVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

General analysis of the impact of the Cuban Revolution on Cuban society and the international political arena. The historical background of the revolution as well as its accomplishments and shortcomings will be emphasized.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 316 | GOD, SELF, AND SOCIETY IN MEDIEVAL CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The roots of Western thought in medieval education, literature, philosophy, and science. The interactions between high theology, mysticism, and popular culture. History and autobiography.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 317 | INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY IN RENAISSANCE ITALY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The flowering of culture, humanism and the arts in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Italy. Renaissance politics, patronage and diplomacy. Religion and the Papacy.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 318 | THE AGE OF REFORMATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Late medieval religion and society; the Reformations of Luther and Calvin, and the Catholic reform movements. Nationalism and the state in sixteenth-century Europe. The expanding world.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 319 | IMMIGRANT AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An overview of the ethnic experience in American society, how ethnic diversity has shaped America as America has re-shaped the lives of immigrants.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 320 | TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 321 | TOPICS IN AFRICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 322 | TOPICS IN ASIAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 323 | THE CULTURES OF EARLY CHRISTIANITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Late antique and early medieval intellectual history in social context.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 324 | COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA: AGE OF CONQUEST, 15TH - 17TH CENTURIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the complexities of the Age of Conquest and focuses on the historical experience of Indigenous societies during the early colonial period. Special attention is given to the social and economic structures of Indigenous societies before 1492, the Spanish exploration and conquest, the presence of Indigenous allies and their role in the dynamics of conquest/colonization, the demographic catastrophe that followed the conquest, and the social, cultural, and economic characteristics of early colonial societies.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 328 | ENGLISH CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of Anglo-Saxon institutions; feudalism after the Norman conquest; growth of the common law; foundations of Parliament and the development of central administrative systems.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 329 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 330 | TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 331 | THE NATION AND NATIONALISM IN EUROPE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the emergence of nations and nationalism in modern Europe as well as nationalists' use and abuse of history.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 332 | FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analyzes the demise of the Old Regime, rise and fall of revolutionary idealism, and the emergence of Napoleon.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 333 | VICTORIAN ENGLAND | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A detailed study of selected political, social, economic and cultural themes in 19th century England.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 334 | BRITAIN IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An in-depth look at selected themes in recent British history including the economic and imperial decline of Great Britain.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 335 | THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT IN EUROPE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analyzes European society and culture in the late 17th and 18th centuries and the intellectual movements that grew out of this historical context, which is frequently considered the cradle of modern Western history and thought.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 337 | REVOLUTION AND NATIONALISM IN IRELAND, 1798 - 1923 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course traces the evolution of Irish nationalism from the United Irishmen Revolt (1798) through the creation of the Irish Free State (1921) and the end of the Civil War (1923). It explores agrarian violence, parliamentary politics and armed revolt, focusing on how these combined to produce Irish independence.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 338 | THE GREAT WAR, 1914 - 1918 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

By using a variety of perspectives--social, cultural, intellectual, political--this course will examine and re-examine the ways that the First World War shaped and affected the modern world. After examining the broader causes of the war, the course will work outward from the battlefields to the home fronts, to the empires, and throughout the post-war world. Although this course focuses on European history, instructors may also examine its global context.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 339 | HISTORY FROM PICTURES: VISUAL CULTURE IN EAST ASIAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How do historians use paintings, woodblock prints, lithographs, photographs, postcards, and other visual artifacts in understanding the past? How do visual objects differ from conventional documents as sources of historical evidence? In this course, we will investigate the methodological approaches to writing history using visual artifacts as primary source material. In particular, we will consider the impact of these issues on the writing of East Asian history.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 340 | CULTURE AND GENDER IN JAPAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines gender and society in early modern and modern Japanese history [c.1600-present].

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 341 | PEASANTS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An analysis of the significance and ultimate disappearance of the peasantry, formerly the numerically dominant group in European society, emphasizing both its social history and the methods needed to study the non-literate.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 342 | TOPICS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 343 | CRIME AND PUNISHMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What kinds of crimes were committed in the past? And how did societies punish the criminal? We will examine the changes in crimes and punishments from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries in Europe, particularly the United Kingdom and her colonies. We will explore the ways that the developing state conceptualized and treated criminality and the consequences of state discipline on criminality.

A grade of C- or above in HST 298 is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 346 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

African-American contributions in the areas of philosophy, theology, politics, literature, and art from 1619 to the present.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 349 | THE HOLOCAUST | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course places the Shoah, the Holocaust of European Jewry, at the center of a broader discussion of anti-Semitism, the rise of Nazism, the conduct of World War II, and the persecution and murder of other groups designated as outsiders or as enemies of the Nazi regime. Close attention is given to interpreting the behavior and experiences of perpetrators, victims, bystanders, and resisters, to the role of the churches, and to the politics of post-Holocaust legal proceedings and the complex work of memory and representation.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 352 | MEDIEVAL INDIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the social, cultural and political histories of South Asia from prehistoric times to the waning of the Mughal Empire.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 353 | MODERN INDIA AND PAKISTAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the modern history of India, giving special attention to India as a prototype of economic and political change in the Third World.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 354 | U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the history of women's work, family, and political lives in America. This intensive reading and discussion course is also designed to provide a detailed overview of recent historical literature and historiographic interpretations in American Women's history.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 355 | GANDHI AND THE WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a political and intellectual history of the individual, his times, and his legacy. The course is designed around a thorough analysis of Gandhi's own writing, significant critiques, and his world legacy.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 359 | SOCIETY AND CULTURE IN THE LATE SOVIET ERA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This seminar focuses on the society and culture of the USSR in the late Soviet period (i.e., from Stalin's death in 1953 to Gorbachev's resignation in 1991). It emphasizes themes such as: evolving notions of the individual in a collective society; tensions between emerging national (ethnic) and supranational (Soviet) identities; attitudes toward science and technology; city and countryside; consumption and consumerism; popular culture and celebrity, work and leisure, religion and orthodoxy; memory and commemoration; sexuality, gender roles, youth culture, and more.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 360 | DOING DIGITAL HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the rapidly expanding world of digital history. Students taking the course will enhance their understanding of the conceptual, theoretical, and ethical issues involved in doing digital history, and learn to use digital tools while working individually and collaboratively on digital history projects.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 361 | TOPICS IN ISLAMIC HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 362 | ATLANTIC HIST0RY, 1492-1825 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of intercontinental exchanges and cross-cultural links across the Atlantic ocean that both separated and united the Western Hemisphere, Europe, and Africa in the pre-industrial era.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 363 | MODERN BALKANS (EUROPE) | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The establishment of national states, the social transformation from peasant to industrial societies, and the effects of war and revolution in southeastern Europe since the late 18th century.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 364 | PALESTINE UNDER THE BRITISH MANDATE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the foundation and evolution of the British Mandate of Palestine from 1914 to 1948 in its British imperial, Middle Eastern, and world historical contexts. Students will engage primary and secondary sources associated with controverted issues, including Zionism, creation of the Mandate, immigration, and inter-communal conflict.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 365 | THE CRUSADES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Addresses the European Crusades to the Holy Land from a World Historical Perspective.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 366 | THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The history of the region since 1800. Topics covered include the end of Ottoman Empire, the impact of European Imperialism and the renewal of Islam.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 367 | US-MEXICAN BORDERLANDS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the history of the U.S.-Mexican borderlands from its creation in 1848 to the present. What makes the U.S.-Mexican borderlands so unique and volatile is that it is one of the few regions in the world where two nations that so distinct in economic formations, political systems, and cultural values come into permanent contact. The course will focus on key issues that have historically shaped the borderlands such as violence, contraband, migrations, race and income inequality.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 368 | SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines how Native Americans, slaves, peasants, and other subaltern people actively resisted their subservient status in Latin America. It will cover a variety of protest movements, from "pre-modern" (such as millenarian movements, slave rebellions, urban riots, and "race" wars) to "modern" (such as social revolutions).

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 369 | REVOLUTIONS IN LATIN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys, analyzes, and compares a series of revolutionary movements, conflicts, and regimes in 20th Century Latin America.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 370 | AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The European's first contact, exploration, and settlement of the Eastern seaboard, with discussion of significant political, economic, and social consequences.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 371 | THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The establishment of American independence, adoption of the Constitution; the first years of the republic considered in analytical detail.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 372 | ANTEBELLUM AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course treats the significant social, political, economic, and cultural developments shaping America and Americans during the first fifty years of the nineteenth century.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 373 | THE CIVIL WAR ERA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the primary causes, events, and outcomes of the American Civil War, 1861-1865. Topics and themes include the sectional differences and similarities between the North and the South from 1820 until secession, including the role of slavery in fostering those sectional differences; the political crises that led to secession; aspects of military strategy and major military events of the war, including guerrilla warfare; the leading political figures of the period; the nature of life on the homefront; the impact of the war on slavery and the contributions of slaves and free blacks to the war; the role of gender and race in shaping the experience of the war; and dissent and disloyalty in both the Confederacy and the Union.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 374 | EMERGENCE OF MODERN AMERICA, 1877-1914 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

New cultural patterns, political party battles, growth of big business and organized labor, women's suffrage movement, Populism and the Progressive Era.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 375 | THE GREAT DEPRESSION AND THE NEW DEAL ERA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A consideration of World War I, the Twenties, the Great Depression, and the New Deal.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 376 | THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1940 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Significant developments in American life during the period after World War II.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 377 | HISTORY OF POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The class will examine changes in the underclass, in perceptions of the poor, and in the remedies used to address poverty in the United States from the late eighteenth to the early twenty-first centuries.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 378 | THE AMERICAN WEST IN THE 20TH CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores cultural, social, and political interaction in the American West during the 20th century. Themes include popular culture, state-federal relationships, environmental changes, urbanization, political and social movements, immigration, and cultural formation.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 379 | RECONSTRUCTION AND THE RISE OF JIM CROW | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course covers the history and culture of the post-Civil War United States, particularly the political epoch called Reconstruction and the establishment of the subsequent system of racial apartheid in the South commonly referred to as Jim Crow (approximately 1863-1930). Topics and themes include the major political, legal, and economic changes that occurred during the Reconstruction period; African American political and social leadership during Reconstruction; the role of Civil War veterans in the United States; the role of gender and race in establishing new legal and cultural norms under Jim Crow; the central role played by violence, particularly lynching and extralegal terrorism, in creating and maintaining segregation; and the establishment of debt peonage and convict leasing as white-controlled systems of labor control.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 380 | GENDER, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE IN 20TH CENTURY AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Why are cars and computers "masculine," but telephones and typewriters "feminine"? How did technological artifacts and systems constitute, mediate, and reproduce gender identities and relations? The course raises questions about the relationship between gender and technology, examining how everyday technologies defined and redefined the workplace, home, and personal identity.

HST 299 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 381 | AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE 1890s-1930s | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students in this course will chart the rise of several industries, engage in close textual analysis of cultural products such as films and vaudeville performances, and study the reception and social impact of key figures, products, and events in the United States from the 1890s through the 1930s. Cross-listed with AMS 340.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 382 | CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM EXPERIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Experience history in Chicago. The course is taught by a Chicago History Museum (CHM) curator/archivist and takes place at the CHM. Expect group work and field trips. Students develop skills and knowledge relevant to public history careers, and will gain a firm conceptual understanding of public history historiography, and of how the Chicago History Museum does public history. Students apply this knowledge to class discussions, assignments, and actual museum projects.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 383 | BORDERLANDS AND FRONTIERS IN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Consideration of the changing conceptions of frontiers in American history with attention to the development of historical borderlands communities.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 384 | TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 385 | UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY TO 1865 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examines the English colonial charters, the constitutional aspects of the American Revolution and the federal Constitution; explores ratification issues, judicial power, the concepts of the Federal system, separation of powers, Foreign Affairs and national security as defined in the U.S. Constitution with reference to major Supreme Court decisions in these areas.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 386 | UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY SINCE 1865 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Problems of civil liberties, rights of accused, privacy and constitutional issues and controversies arising during and after World War II, including the major decisions of the Warren court, Burger court and Rehnquist court..

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 387 | TOPICS IN RUSSIAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Each time this course is taught, it will examine in depth a specific problem, issue, theme, or moment in Russian history as described in the course subtitle. Possible offerings include: "Mass Culture in the Soviet Union and Post-Soviet Russia," "Stalin and Stalinism," "Crime and Criminality in Russia," "The Russian Revolution," " Gender and Sexuality in Russia," and "The Rise and Fall of the New Soviet Man.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 388 | THE COURT AND THE U.S. BILL OF RIGHTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of historical, philosophical, and legal developments related to the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution. The course will also examine how the Bill of Rights has been affected by Supreme Court appointments, court decisions, and constitutional amendments.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 389 | TOPICS IN PUBLIC HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Public history is a field of history that requires its practitioners to use the skills and methods of academic history with an eye towards connecting the public with that history. This seminar focuses on the skills, methods, sources and themes that are relevant to historians whose work takes them outside of the classroom. Theme of the seminar will vary with instructors. Some off-campus fieldtrips may be required.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 390 | CAPSTONE IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The History Capstone in Historical research and Writing allows students to engage in deep and sustained historical research and writing, with multiple opportunities for instructor feedback and student revision. It is also an excellent way for students to experience firsthand the linkages between broad reading in a given field and subsequent primary-source based research in that field. Every autumn and winter quarter, certain 300-level course offerings will be designated as Capstone-linked classes. Students ready to take this course can choose among the offerings as suits their interests.

A grade C- or above in HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

HST 391 | DOING LOCAL AND COMMUNITY HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Collaborative learning groups will work with community partners in order to produce a tangible end-of-quarter public history project whose audience will be the greater Chicago community. This course carries a junior year experiential learning credit.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 392 | PUBLIC HISTORY INTERNSHIP | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

History students have interned with the South Hampton Historical Museum (in Long Island, NY), the Chicago History Museum, the Evanston History Center, the Frances Willard House Museum and Memorial Archives, the National Public Housing Museum, the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, Lake County Historical Museum, and a host of other archives, and historical organizations. In addition to evaluations from a site supervisor, a faculty member evaluates students` reflective writing that draws connections between relevant public historical readings and field experience. The Public History Concentration Director would be happy to discuss possible internship opportunities with interested students (at least a quarter in advance), and to assist in matching student interests to public history venues. Note: internship placement is incumbent upon the student.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 394 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Examination of the African American experience in American cities: from slave era, to the migration, to the present.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 395 | ISSUES IN NON-U.S. LEGAL HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Designed to develop in the prelaw student analytical and adversarial skills useful in the practice of law, and to confront controversial issues dealing with values of the lawyer and the citizen.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 396 | ORAL HISTORY: MEMORY, METHOD AND PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to the techniques of oral history with particular emphasis on public history.

A C- or better in HST 199 (or HST 298) or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

HST 398 | STUDY TOUR | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An in-depth, on-site overview of the historical, political, social and economic reality of a foreign country. Credit variable.

HST 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4.5 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Majors only. Credit variable.

Junior standing or above is a prerequisite for this class.

HST 421 | THE HISTORICAL DISCIPLINE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to the fundamental concerns and skills necessary for the study of history at the graduate level. It does this by providing a "history of history," giving students an overview of the growth and development of the academic discipline of history, by addressing issues of methodology, historiography and historical philosophy, and by providing students with an awareness of current concerns, controversies, and debates in the discipline. Restricted to students in the MA in History program.

Status as an MA in History student is a prerequisite for this class.

HST 422 | SEMINAR IN PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course builds upon HST 421. It focuses on issues raised by the analysis of historical evidence, and exposes students to the many practical and theoretical tools by which historians construct historical knowledge out of this "raw" material. The course will include study of primary sources, methods of analysis and authentication, and ways in which different kinds of sources are integrated into coherent historical narratives.

HST 431 | COLLOQUIUM IN AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 432 | COLLOQUIUM IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 433 | COLLOQUIUM IN AFRICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 434 | COLLOQUIUM IN ASIAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 435 | COLLOQUIUM IN EUROPEAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 436 | COLLOQUIUM IN ISLAMIC HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 437 | COLLOQUIUM IN WORLD HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 438 | COLLOQUIUM: SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

HST 489 | GRADUATE CAPSTONE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is an intensive seminar in which students are asked to analyze a number of important works of scholarship drawn from the breadth and complexity of the historical discipline. The course allows students to synthesize the many skills they have learned in their earlier classes, notably the ability to read and assess historical monographs. They will thereby demonstrate their competence in analyzing historical arguments, their knowledge of both historiography and historical content, and their proficiency in understanding the variety of primary sources and methods of interpreting them.

HST 492 | GRADUATE INTERNSHIP | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Internship.

HST 497 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 4-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Independent Study.

HST 499 | THESIS RESEARCH | 4-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Between four and eight hours credit to be determined by the department.

HST 500 | CANDIDACY CONTINUATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This 0-credit hour course is available to master?s degree candidates who are actively working toward the completion of a thesis, project, or portfolio. Enrollment in this course is limited to three quarters and requires thesis/project advisor and graduate director approval and demonstration to them of work each quarter. Enrollment in this course allows access to the library and other campus facilities. This course carries and requires the equivalent of half-time enrollment status. The student may be eligible for loan deferment and student loans. This course is graded as pass/fail. (0 credit hours)

HST 501 | CANDIDACY MAINTENANCE | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This 0-credit hour course is available to graduate students who are not registered for a course in a given quarter but need to maintain active university status. Enrollment in this course is limited to three quarters and requires permission of the graduate director. Enrollment in this course allows access to the library and other campus facilities. This course does not carry an equivalent enrollment status and students in it are not eligible for loan deferment or student loans. This course is not graded. (0 credit hours)