Human Community (HC)

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HC 101 | THE ART OF NEGOTIATION: REALIZING OPPORTUNITY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

When we hear the word "negotiations", most of us think about formal events between CEOS and Wall Street dealmakers. In reality, negotiations take place in every facet of our lives, both personally and professionally. Negotiation is the art and science of securing an agreement between two or more parties. This course will provide you with the tools for achieving their personal and professional goals by implementing effective negotiation strategies and techniques. You will learn different negotiation strategies and techniques, and will practically apply these techniques in mock negotiations with other students. This course will focus on the behavior leading to effective negotiations and how to analyze your own behavior in negotiations. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 105 | ALL ABOUT ME: UNDERSTANDING ONESELF THROUGH JOURNALING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The goal of this class is to teach students the elements of journal writing, allow them to acknowledge and react to personal experiences and enable them to think clearly about these experiences. Students will be engaged in individual as well as group activities to accomplish this goal. Journaling on a continued basis might help students reduce stress and improve social relationships as they write and analyze certain experiences in their lives. (2 quarter hours)

HC 116 | PSYCHOLOGY OF MALE DEVELOPMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the development of boys from infancy through adulthood within socio-cultural context. We therefore address in addition to gender, the impact of race, ethnicity, class and related issues of societal /governmental failures when it comes to non-voting children. We cover why boys have more trouble at school, more problems with anger, and more incarcerations than girls or boys of higher social class, but our focus will be on their capacities and how those in power can help them thrive rather than present obstacles in their path from birth onwards. In my work in Chicago schools from Englewood to Rogers Park, I found young boys and teens very capable of caring and empathy but not reinforced by adults to develop these skills. This course suggests ways to change that and help teachers, parents and society not stereotype boys or give up on them so early in life. We will focus on how boys can develop fully as men of character and care, who can succeed in relationships, as parents, at work and in their community. We will learn of advocacy work to convince society to improve the conditions in which boys live. We draw upon the work of the Search Institute, the book "The Men They Will Become" by Eli Newberger (free online) and other current research. We will view workshops including feminist Judith Jordan's "Raising Competent and Connected Boys" and learn of local and national efforts to support young boys development. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 118 | MAKING SOCIAL CHANGE: THE LEGACY OF THE 1960'S | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In the first twenty years following World War II, Americans participated in the democratic process and in civil society in record numbers. They participated in public meetings, belonged to labor unions, joined churches, and formed professional societies. These civic structures and habits of involvement empowered citizens to believe they could make a difference in their communities and laid the groundwork for some of the major social movements of the second half of the 20th Century. Civil rights, second-wave feminism, gay rights, and Latino rights all have their roots in the 1960s and continued their work over the following decades. In this class, we will explore civic engagement through the lens of our recent history. We will look at how these movements developed and analyze how they achieved their goals. We will take lessons from our predecessors and apply them to our own efforts to make a contribution to the lives of people in our local, national or global communities. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 141 | COACHING FOR PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT AND PROFESSIONAL EFFECTIVENESS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Effective coaching has long been recognized as a key element of success in the world of sports. More recently, a new breed of coaches has emerged to help people transform their personal and professional lives. In this course, we will explore the theories, concepts, and techniques of personal life and business coaching. Students will learn about the history of coaching, its uses in personal and professional development and practical applications. Working individually, in pairs, and in small groups, students will practice coaching skills and keep a detailed learning journal. This course will be highly experiential and collaborative in nature. Students will learn concepts of coaching for personal development and professional effectiveness. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 148 | COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this class, we will explore and develop the skills, values and knowledge that contribute to collaborative learning. Today perhaps more than any other time in human history we are aware that no one is an island. At the individual, organizational and societal levels, we are all interconnected and interdependent. We can only meet our goals and address our problems at any of those levels if we work at them with one another. Therefore, as never before, we need to learn how to learn together. Collaborative learning is the process of two or more people helping each other to deepen and expand their shared understanding of the challenges and opportunities they face. It involves stimulating new insights in one another, and helping each other make changes in our assumptions, beliefs and behaviors. We will read and discuss a book on theory and skills of helping others to learn. We will practice skills each week with each other via telephone. We will also participate in informal online discussions. Each week, a formal reflection will be submitted. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 165 | CHINA: MONEY, POWER AND THE 21ST CENTURY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The greatest migration of people in the history of the world is occurring right now, in China. Hundreds of millions of people, whose families have lived in rural China for thousands of years, are moving to rapidly urbanizing cities. This course analyzes, through the voices of the Chinese people, the dramatic impact of this social and economic revolution upon families and individuals. These changes are having a worldwide impact upon economics, trade and the new world order. Through lecture/discussions, videos, readings, on-line discussion boards and independent research, students will have the opportunity to form their own viewpoints as to the impact of globalization upon one of the oldest civilizations on earth. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 173 | HUMAN RIGHTS IN BUSINESS AND SOCIETY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students study the history of human rights development as they emerged from religious belief, philosophical visions of natural law, social structures and legal systems. Students will also examine opposition to human rights over the centuries when rights threatened traditional patterns of authority, prejudices, vested interests, customs and claims of national sovereignty. Study then shifts to recent human rights documents beginning with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. The racism convention is studied as the case study with focus on its application and lack thereof in the U.S. and Chicago. Students then apply knowledge from the case study to examine human rights work performed by a local NGO, by a local company or by their community. The course concludes with current human rights advances in corporations, governments and NGOs. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 178 | GENDER AT WORK | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

From the days of hunters and gatherers our world has been organized by gender expectations. While these gender roles have evolved over time, women and men today still struggle to meet these expectations and they have largely defined who we are for centuries. We have more choices and freedom to renegotiate and transcend these roles now than at any other time in history, and yet they still impact every aspect of our lives. This course will explore how gender can influence communication patterns, leadership styles, negotiation skills, conflict styles, work/life balance expectations, relationships and a multitude of other aspects of our life at work and at home. Students will demonstrate learning outcomes through class participation, group projects, journal entries and other assignments that will allow them to apply course readings, films, and discussion to their own personal experience. (2-4 credit hours)

HC 189 | LATINO CHICAGO | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, we will learn about the concepts of race, class and gender and how these intersect to shape Chicago Latinos' experiences. While we will learn about the inequities that Latinos have experienced, we will also explore this community's struggle for social justice and its efforts to create a voice for itself in Chicago. We will conclude this course by exploring how Latinos/as are building new political, theoretical, economic, artistic, and spiritual pathways toward wholeness and justice. For example, we will explore some of the cultural and political projects of this community and the many groups that comprise it. We will learn about these themes and address questions through readings, class lectures and discussions, guest lectures, documentary films and field trips. Field trips to Latino Chicago communities such as Pilsen and Humboldt Park will take place during class time.

HC 190 | LAW IN AMERICA: ITS HISTORY AND RELEVANCE IN TODAY'S WORLD | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to enhance students' awareness of how critical American law is for their personal, professional, and community life. The purpose is to help students achieve a better grasp of current realities through understanding of the history, the structure, and inherent problems of the American legal system. The course will discuss the role of lawyers and the public in the legal process (e.g. the role of civil rights groups and lobbyists in forming laws). It will begin with the colonial underpinnings and the essentially Western and British foundations of the American legal institutions. There will be some discussion of alternative legal systems. It will then review the American Constitution, the nature of a federal system, and specific topics in American law. These topics will include the basic rights in our system, and the law as it has evolved in dealing with race ("the strange career of Jim Crow"), speech (free and otherwise), labor (its rough course), criminality and its outcomes, religion (how religious is the law), and business regulation (how much can we trust antitrust). The course will be relevant for students interested in the law as a career, the law in the workplace, the law in not-for-profit settings, and those generally interested in the law in business contexts, as well as those seeking to understand the role of the law in our social and cultural context. We will use one major textbook, as well as selected readings on topics. Students will be asked to bring their own experiences with the American legal system into our discussions and to share their perspectives of the various topics. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 192 | HOW, WHAT AND WHY WE EAT: THE ART, SCIENCE AND PSYCHOLOGY OF FOOD | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

We have many connections to food. Food sustains us but it has meaning that extends far beyond basic nutrition. Eating is an individual pleasure and comfort, a tool for creating and sustaining social bonds, and a way to express one's cultural identity. Food is tied to many aspects of life including culture, politics, agriculture and the environment. Americans have become disconnected from both the production of our food and from the joy of eating it and suffer from food related health problems such as diabetes, obesity and eating disorders. In this class we will explore the myriad of food-related habits and choices, that determine how what and why we eat. This experiential class moves beyond specific dietary guidelines by presenting concepts and skills that will help you reframe your connections with food. We will explore the multiple dimensions of food and eating from an individual, community and national level. We will explore the true meaning of nourishment. Topics include: identifying personal eating styles, mindful eating exercises, the slow food movement, locating Chicago food deserts, a field trip to a popular Chicago organic garden/restaurant, guest speaker from a Chicago restaurant mural artist, examining types of hunger and nourishment, and issues involving food and ritual, food and story, food and psychology, food and art. We will combine art, film clips, lectures, field trip, research, and mindful eating skills. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 194 | GENTRIFICATION AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will offer students an overview of gentrification and an opportunity to read and discuss critical issues of gentrification, such as housing and schools in low-income communities and racialized urban development, in a social justice framework. To gain a deeper understanding of those issues, students will conduct research on gentrification in Chicago neighborhoods in small groups. Based on the group research, each student will engage in civic action by writing a letter to a local politician. (2 hours)

HC 198 | JUVENILE JUSTICE: IS IT WORKING? | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore juvenile justice through a sociological lens that encompasses legal, ethical, institutional, racial, gender and economic perspectives. The course will address the foundation and origin of the juvenile justice system in Illinois and its role as pioneer in juvenile justice throughout the United States. We will examine the various entities responsible for the implementation of juvenile justice including the challenges and obstacles encountered in pursuit of intervention and prevention of juvenile delinquency. A network of professionals dedicated to working with and supporting juveniles involved in the system will speak to how the key institutions interact, combat and collaborate with each other and the impact those dynamics have on the juveniles, their families and communities. The methodologies and efficacy of responses to delinquency such as punishment, incarceration, rehabilitation, substance treatment and re-entry will also be considered. The class will take on such questions as what contributes to juvenile delinquency, how is juvenile delinquency defined, how does it differ amongst communities, how did we get here and what does the future of juvenile delinquency look like in Illinois? (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 199 | MANIFESTATIONS OF BELIEF: RELIGION VS. THE CONSTITUTION DURING THE HOLIDAYS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The United States Constitution guarantees freedom of religion to its citizens. What is freedom of religion? How is this basic right interpreted? How far can the individual citizen go in demonstrating religious belief? When do the rights of the many supercede the rights of the few? These questions have been particularly prickly over the last few years when objections to the recitations by school children of the Pledge of Allegiance, and the display of religiously oriented holiday decorations have made national news. Where do you fall on these issues? Is it okay for New York City to have a big Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center? Do you mind if your neighborhood church displays a creche on its front lawn? What about the town hall? In this course, students will examine holiday displays around town and assess their relation to freedom of expression and freedom of religion. Students will also consider the nature of free societies, their relationship to community values, and the ways in which difference is valued, or not valued, in contemporary American culture. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 201 | STRATEGIC CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, we will distinguish principled negotiation from positional negotiation. When all parties in a negotiation recognize everyone's values and interests, the stage is set for principled negotiation. In order to uncover the underlying values and interests of all parties in the negotiation, we will learn the process to manage our perceptions and the techniques to manage the other party's perceptions. We will recognize the value of various types of questions. Generally speaking, contract formation is the goal of a successful negotiation. Understanding basic contract law is key to improving a negotiation. We will examine the development of contract law. We will cover the basics of contract formation: offer, acceptance and consideration. We will examine the remedies available when a contract is breached. We will review various examples of contract disputes to evaluate the practical application of what we learned. We will put to use our basic understanding of contract law and the existence of inequities in bargaining power and our acquired negotiation skills, including using the model of spiritual development of the "four agreements," to use by participating in a contract negotiation as a final class project. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 206 | US CITIES: BANNED IN BOSTON | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Boston is ambiguous. It is a world class city from a cultural and educational perspective, but diminutive when considering the standards set by New York or Los Angeles. It is rich and expensive, but poor in economic growth and population. It is the go-to place for American history, but is also eclipsed by more famous locales such as Ellis Island and Washington DC. It has an ocean at its front door, but then so does Honolulu, where the weather is generally better! No matter where you were born, if you live in America, you have been influenced by Boston and its tumultuous history. John and Abigail Adams, Alexander Graham Bell, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and John Kennedy lived for a time in Boston, as did Emily Dickenson, Robert Frost, Ben Affleck, Malcolm X, and Aerosmith. The list of famous Bostonians is quite long, indeed. What makes Boston and Bostonians tick? What does "banned in Boston" mean? Who were the Cabots and the Lodges anyway? In this travel course centered on this most pivotal of US Cities, learners will walk the freedom trail, visit Boston's most famous art collections, and its equally famous North End. Issues such as Boston's immigrant populations, its fame as a seat of American higher education, its connection to events in American history, and its economic output will be discussed. (2-6 quarter hours)

HC 208 | THE HEART OF THE ENTREPRENEUR | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Entrepreneurs are an integral part of a thriving economy yet the aspects of successful entrepreneurship remain a mystery. This course takes a detailed look at the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful entrepreneurs, enabling the students to acquire a personal understanding of what it takes to start a new business venture. This course is especially targeted for those interested in starting their own business or aspiring to be an employee within an innovative business. (2 credit hours)

HC 209 | USING FINANCIAL INFORMATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces the student to the principles of financial theory and the world of finance. The course covers several concepts and surveys the roles of relevant institutions. In the conceptual part, students will learn about financial instruments and techniques used in financial decision making (time value of money, cost of capital, capital structure). In the survey of relevant institutions' roles, the students will form a basis for understanding causes and effects in the changing global environment. The interrelationships between decisions of business, financial institutions and individuals will become evident, enabling the student to better understand current events in finance. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 212 | GLOBAL LEADERSHIP | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Leading global and domestic organizations requires understanding, appreciating and managing the impact of culture and the interplay of cultural patterns in everyday interactions. To be successful, leaders must be able to interpret complex cultural contexts and develop intercultural competence, not only in themselves but in the people they lead and the other organizations they work with. Developing intercultural competence is an ongoing endeavor that requires stretching one's thinking to adopt new cultural perspectives regarding others' values, attitudes and behaviors. But it is not an end in itself: intercultural competence is the basis for successful social interactions and business communications, which are especially important in today's "flat" world. "Global Leadership at Home and Abroad" will explore the demand for and ways to develop this distinct skill set among leaders so they can establish communities and initiate change across diverse groups of stakeholders. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 213 | GLOBAL BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY AND THE UNITED NATIONS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

SNL students will study global business issues with Ambassador Kamal via video conferencing from New York City and hold discussions with students and professors in Mexico City and Guadalajara also via video conferencing. Several SNL students outside of Chicago can connect via Scopia desktop video conferencing to the Chicago classroom, New York and the universities in Mexico to participate in each Thursday class. This is not Distance Education. Discussions will focus on global business and technology issues U.S. and Mexican companies face today and global perspectives. SNL students will work on teams with students in Mexico City and Guadalajara on a climate change project via video conferencing and D2L. Instructors: Pat Szczerba at SNL and Ambassador Kamal in New York. Students and professors at University Panamericana Mexico City and Guadalajara. (2-4 hours)

HC 215 | EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE WORKPLACE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How do individual emotional traits support, or detract from, leadership behaviors in today?s ever-changing organizations? We learn to identify and strengthen core traits of emotional intelligence at work, and to collaborate intelligently and effectively with others to meet the high standards of organizational improvement. Special focus on theories of active leadership and their relevance to an emotionally-positive workplace culture. (2-6 hours)

HC 219 | THE FIGHT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS: ONE WOMAN'S CRUSADE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Helen Prejean is a leading human rights activist in the United States. For the past 30 years, she has helped shape conversation about equal treatment for all within the criminal justice system, especially persons of color and the materially poor. Dead Man Walking, the eyewitness account of her experience accompanying condemned prisoners to execution, has had a major influence on discussion of violence, poverty, civil rights, criminal law, and social justice. In this course, we use her work and interact with her personally to study power inequities across race and class lines that perpetuate injustice and examine her strategies for reform. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 221 | PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING SKILLS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Authentic, credible oral communication is paramount to attain professional and personal success. The purpose of this course is to hone each student's ability to orally communicate effectively and with ease. Regardless of the starting point - as a beginner or a seasoned speaker - we will identify personal strengths and areas for improvement, and work upward from there. With an emphasis on the professional environment, we will explore a variety of common scenarios. Students will gain practical techniques to improve performance - ranging from formal presentations to meeting facilitations to impromptu thinking. These workplace opportunities are abundant, and participants will learn methods to shine within each! Because we represent different industries, backgrounds, and experience levels, we will employ a mix of individual and collaborative activities. The latter will ensure that we're capitalizing on resources within our unique learning group. Students will be encouraged to select topics that are relevant to their respective careers. As well, students may use this class as an opportunity to work on their real-life speaking scenarios(s), provided it fits within the assignment parameters. (2 credit hours)

HC 222 | FACILITATIVE DIALOGUE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Verbal communication is an essential component in virtually every aspect of our interpersonal lives. The focus of this course is to study those situations and settings where we need to facilitate appropriate dialogue in order to arrive at a solution in the face of potentially emotional volatility. As examples, these conversations can include: confronting an uncooperative coworker, assessing alleged wrongdoing by a student, addressing resistance in a patient, or meeting the needs of a disgruntled customer. In these situations, our own behavioral and verbal actions are important determinants in the direction, duration, and consequences of the interaction. Given the potential for us to be verbally accosted, hostilely confronted, and/or be inappropriately blamed, we often have to manage our own emotions in addition to trying to engage in facilitative dialogue. Students will examine the processes involved in emotionally volatile situations including how our emotional and physiological state work in these situations. Students will learn a framework to more effectively manage the situation in order to arrive at an acceptable outcome. This course is appropriate for those in human resources, patient- and service-oriented industries, counseling, education, leadership development, and other settings where facilitative dialogue is necessary. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 223 | MONEY, FINANCE, AND CRISES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Money has become such an integral part of our everyday life that we take its everyday use, whether physically or electronically, for granted. Yet the reach of money goes far beyond what we experience. Money is much more involved in the inner workings of the economy through the interaction of financial markets (bond markets, stock markets, foreign exchange markets, etc.) and financial institutions (banks, mutual funds, insurance companies, pension funds, etc.). Financial markets and institutions everywhere, and particularly in the U.S., influence the trillions of dollars that flow daily worldwide. Their impact on the welfare of nations and on the capacity of the economy to produce goods and services becomes evident when one looks at the Great Recession, which started in 2008. The goal of this course is to provide a working understanding of many issues through the study of money, banking, and financial markets. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 235 | CHINA:WHY CHINA MATTERS-GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP FROM AN ASIAN PERSPECTIVE | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In light of China's influence on socio-economic and cultural globalization, the program examines the role of culture with its values and paradigmatic assumptions and what it means to be an informed global citizen. Inter-cultural exchanges in the USA and China guide students to critically analyze values about democracy and raise awareness about the role a country's cultural beliefs in forming and sustaining such values in its citizens. On-site, guided excursions into historical sites, e.g., the Great Wall, the Confucian Temple and Imperial Academy, Beijing's Business District, and the ancient neighborhood of Hutongs and dialogue with Chinese university students and faculty, clarify the roles and impact of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism on the global stage. This international, cross-cultural dialogue is facilitated to question assumptions while gaining a deeper understanding of differing world views. Participants will mutually explore their cultures through readings, guest lectures, and Internet-based interaction prior to and during the travel in China, with students and faculty at the Agricultural University in Beijing and Xiamen University in southeast China. The activities are designed to engage participants in critical discourse and analysis on the differences as much as the common ground surrounding issues such as social and civic engagement, democracy, and religion from the respective cultures.

HC 238 | CULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS IN CUBA: WHO TALKS TO WHOM IN SCHOOLS AND CAFES | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This study abroad course will provide participants with a foundation in the theories of intercultural communications. They will observe how people from different cultures communicate in public spaces, cafes, schools and other institutions and evaluate how communications are affected by place. Through their stay in Havana and a day trip to Vinhales, participants will analyze how different socio- cultural factors interact to shape individuals and interaction patterns in these different settings, as well as in the United States. They will engage in global communication and evaluate the impact of communication differences that diverse political, religious, social, ethnic and educational backgrounds have on individuals communicating within an organization or individually. Prior to departure, participants will use interactive, online technology to engage in cross-cultural communication and to create criteria for evaluating and comparing communication patterns. In Cuba, participants will collaboratively use the criteria to analyze cross-cultural aspects of language and interactions in various settings from social and political perspectives. The trip duration is 7 days. The readings and activities ground students in recent theories of intercultural practice and provide a framework for students to become interculturally competent. Students will be staying in small groups in Casa Particulares, similar to Bed and Breakfasts, and hosted by Cuban families. The activities tentatively planned include touring Old Havana and the Plaza de la Revolucion, a visit to the Museo de la Revolucion, a visit to the Callejon de Hamel street fair, a day in rural Cuba to visit a tobacco farm and the Sierra del Rosario Biosphere Reserve, a visit to the Akokan community and the Casa de Africa, and a day at the beach. An important part of the curriculum are visits to local elementary schools, guest lectures with local university professors and an afternoon and evening with university students.

HC 239 | BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY AND OUR GLOBAL FUTURE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students will study the latest changes in the fields of intercultural communication and leadership development in today's global corporations, including reading interviews from some of the world's leaders in manufacturing, energy, telecommunications, and health care from numerous countries. This course combines hard science with cutting-edge organizational research-based case studies in today's trans-cultural global corporations. Students study key behaviors needed today to be successful in a global corporation, including cultural self-awareness, frame-shifting, inviting the unknown, third-way solutions, and others. Students will also study how "disruptive technologies", mobile internet, automation of knowledge work, cloud technology, next generation genomics, 3D printing, advanced materials, and renewable energy are changing and will continue to revolutionize global corporations. This course concludes with an analysis of the effects of social justice and corporate social responsibility on today's global corporations. (2-4 credit hours)

HC 247 | APPLYING ECONOMICS: A PRACTICAL APPROACH | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This applied economic course is tailored to introduce students to economic issues, without employing complex graphical and mathematical models. The material to be covered caters to students who are concerned citizens and active participants in the economy, and want to achieve a better grasp of problems facing society today. Students will learn how to use fun tools from game theory to analyze some of society's most puzzling problems, such as pollution, health care, the depletion of natural resources, how the pursuit of individual goals can lead to poor collective outcomes, and also the challenges of monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth, inflation, unemployment, income inequality, etc. Students will learn by doing, through hands-on experiments and practical exercises.(2-4 credit hours)

HC 249 | NONPROFITS: A GUIDE TO A MULTIBILLION DOLLAR BUSINESS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In the wake of the East Asian Tsunami, Hurricane Katrina and cuts in federal programs, the nonprofit sector has increasingly played a significant role at the local, national and worldwide level. A multi-billion industry, nonprofits provide essential services in many forms including education, enhancement of the arts and social welfare programs. This course explores the role of nonprofits in the US, the practical methods nonprofits employ and the differences in working in and managing a nonprofit organization from a for-profit venture. Using hands-on case studies and learning from nonprofit managers, students will demonstrate competencies through class participation, each student will have the opportunity to create a nonprofit business plan and examine emerging issues in nonprofit management. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 253 | FAMILY LIFE: THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF FAMILIES | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In history, families have been defined as mother, father, and children. In our current experience, more families differ from that model than comply with it. Family structure is evolving. Missing fathers, Single parents, and Blended families are only a few of the changes to the family structure that have occurred with some significance beginning in the 1950s. (2-4 quarter hours) What influences family structure? Do economics and education make a difference? Are race and ethnicity important factors? What about gender, personality and religion? Is the two parent family necessary? What role do grandparents and great grandparents play in the changing family? Perhaps the most important question we can ask about the family is what comes next. What are the many ways in which families might be redesigned in the future? How do these changes impact individuals in society? Competences: H4, H3X, A3A, FX.

HC 257 | PARTICIPATION AND DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Why don't more Americans vote? How do education, income, and age impact voting trends? Why are some Americans more interested in politics than others? How is inequality reflected in other forms of political participation, such as donating money? Do recent trends in voter ID laws help to safeguard the democratic process, or restrict it? In summary, how democratic or representative are American elections? The course begins with some famous arguments about why participation matters. Trends in voter turnout then become the primary object of study, but we also consider other forms of participation including writing members of Congress, attending political meetings and contributing money. We explore recent discoveries in behavioral psychology that are changing the strategies of modern campaigns. After taking this course, you will understand the fundamental role of participation in democracy. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 259 | CHICAGO POLITICS: IT "AIN'T BEAN BAG! | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to Chicago's political institutions: City Hall, the city's system of 50 wards, its current aldermen and women, its city council, its mayor, its elections, and its raucous history of scandals and reform movements. Students also will explore the history and exploits of some of Chicago's most memorable mayors and political "bosses" from Long John Wentworth, who guided the city during the civil war; Carter Harrison I, who presided over the 1893 Columbian Exposition; Big Bill Thompson, who encouraged and protected bootleggers; Anton Cermak who stood as a "reformer" against the mob, only to be assassinated; Ed Kelly who rebuilt the Democratic "machine" during the 1930s Depression and 1940s War Years, and built the subways; "Boss" Richard J. Daley, who directed Chicago's post-war building and highway boom that made Chicago into a national urban "model"; Jane Byrne, the city's first and only female mayor, who beat the "machine" of which she was once a prominent member; Harold Washington, Chicago's first and only African-American mayor, who brought a sense of racial justice to the city after decades of discrimination; Richard M. Daley, whose public works and "education reform" agenda elevated Chicago to "world-class" city status; to Chicago's newest mayor. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 261 | THE JOURNEY OF LEADERSHIP THROUGH ANCIENT GREEK LITERATURE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Leadership is a journey. Odysseus, a well-respected leader in the ancient Greek literary world, portrays a model of leadership in the Trojan War that can be used today. This course provides an opportunity to read, reflect and discuss the many lessons that can be found in classic literature. A close reading of Homer's Odyssey, along with other articles on myth, archetypes, and leadership theories and practices, will allow the student to align their current leadership practices to ideas formed by Homer and expand their thinking in the arena of leadership. Reflecting on these readings, along with some structured journal exercises, will create alignment with what is often thought to be "old" text, generating new ideas on how leadership lessons can be applied to contemporary issues at work, at home or in their communities. (2 credit hours)

HC 263 | THE MYTHS AND THE MAGIC OF HEALING | 2-6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The stories we tell ourselves and the ones that are told to us can have a powerful impact on how we understand health, healing and healing processes. Examining these stories, which are sometimes based on reliable evidence, other times grounded in unquestioned assumptions, may assist us as we face discomfort and disease in our own lives and the lives of others whom we know. This course will engage the learner in a critical analysis of biomedical, social, religious and New Age beliefs about the nature of healing processes. We will consider what can help support an enhanced quality of life in the face of health challenges. Donald M. Epstein?s book, Healing Myths, Healing Magic, will be a primary text for the course, along with scholarly articles and popular media. This is a 10 week, on-ground course. (2-6 hours)

HC 267 | WORKPLACE LAW: HARASSMENT, DISCRIMINATION AND CIVIL RIGHTS | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on laws affecting relationships between employers and employees and within the workplace. Students will study the historical and societal aspects of laws on harassment and discrimination within the workplace, with particular focus on the Civil Rights Act and various other legislation regulating harassment and discrimination in the workplace. Students will analyze the case law, the legislation and the legal systems that have evolved to combat social injustice in the workplace and will learn "best methods" for preventing and resolving harassing and discriminatory practices in the workplace. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 274 | THE BILL OF RIGHTS IN CONTEMPORARY LIFE AND WORK | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will be organized around a series of central questions: What is a law? Who has the authority to make one? What are the various sources of law? What is or should be the relationship between law, ethics and morality, between law and religion? What is the difference between legislative law and constitutional law? What are the legal, historical, philosophical and political sources of American constitutional law? What sort of society did the Framers of the Bill of Rights have in mind and are their ideas still applicable in 21st century America? How does the Bill of Rights fit into our constitutional framework and what rights does it guarantee? What is the relationship between the states and the federal government in guaranteeing those rights? What is the relationship between our legal system and our political system generally? What criteria do judges use to interpret laws? How does our own legal system differ from those of other countries and cultures? Are there any universal rights worth protecting? What role does (or should) science play in upholding our rights under the Bill of Rights? Possible areas to be covered are freedom of speech, religion, establishment of church and state, the right to privacy, the 4th, 5th and 6th Amendments? protections for criminal defendants and the death penalty. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 282 | JAZZ AGE PARIS: 1919-1939 | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a history of Parisian society and culture in the era between the two world wars. We will explore issues of race, class and gender in the interwar period in French society. We will also examine the role of American writers, artists, musicians and performers in the cultural world of Paris, the City of Light, and an outpost in the Harlem Renaissance. (2-4 credit hours)

HC 283 | GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES OF WORK & FAMILY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What role does the political, economic, and cultural structure of a nation play in its concepts of work and family? This course develops students' understanding of issues in the history of family and work through historical and contemporary accounts from Europe and the United States. We will take a close look at issues such as the gender division of labor, child labor, government policies on maternity, economic structure as well as social and political movements. Course materials include historical documents, lectures, films, and varied readings. Assignments will include essays, reflection journals, discussion, and a research project on work-life balance. (2 - 4 credit hours)

HC 289 | PSYCHOLOGY FROM AN AFRICAN-CENTERED PERSPECTIVE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course utilizes an African-centered theoretical framework to examine salient themes pertinent to the psychology of people of African descent, including child development, family functioning, identity, education, racial oppression, spirituality, and healing. It takes an historical and topical approach to foster greater understanding about the course content. Through this examination, the learner will become more knowledgeable about the psychological experiences of people of African descent, the role of history and culture in human development, and the subjectivity of research in the social and natural sciences. They will also reflect on the relevance of the course material to their personal lives. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 299 | ASSESSING AND MANAGING CONFLICT | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Our usual method for presenting, analyzing, and resolving conflicts has centered around legalistic argument; the goal being to discover the "right" answer and suppress the "wrong" ones. However, the multiple worldviews operating in the world today make such an approach to conflict less viable. Reflecting this reality, ways of communicating about and resolving conflict have arisen that go beyond enforcement of rules or legal determinations of right and wrong. In this course, we will look at various methods for handling conflict and consider how we might apply them to personal, work, community and literary conflicts through lecture, small group work, role playing, reading, various written projects, and discussion. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 300 | GLOBALIZATION AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

For decades scholars have observed a growing body of evidence and employers a growing body of experience of significant changes in the way that international business is conducted. These changes in the business world, brought on largely by globalization, present new challenges. These challenges require staff with specific skills related to global competence in order for the business to remain competitive. The goal of this course is to help students to cultivate and/or refine the skills and capabilities necessary to succeed in today's global work environment. Organized around four learning units and one major project, the class will provide each student with extensive content and resources; it will also provide a forum for assessing the competences necessary to attain success in a global workplace and a method for honing those skills each student needs to cultivate. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 302 | ACTIVE CITIZENS: MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE COMMUNITY, WORKPLACE WORLD | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Americans are known for active participation in organizations that strengthen our communities. We coach our kid's sports teams, take meals to members of our congregations, work for candidates that we believe in and join marches to support or oppose government action. With all these activities, we engage with other members of our community and workplace to make it better for ourselves and our families and to promote social justice. In this class, we will develop the knowledge and practice skills that enhance civic engagement and explore the role of citizens' voices in a democracy in the face of powerful political and economic interests. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 315 | ECONOMICS FOR DECISION-MAKING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to provide the modern consumer living in a global economy fueled by unabated technological progress, with basic notions to understand the path that has led to sustained prosperity. The focus is on endowing students, as householders, with conceptual tools to make optimal financial and consumer decisions throughout the life-cycle. That theoretical foundation is reinforced and exemplified with a wealth of practical applications offered through a student-friendly online interactive learning platform, which also provides a convenient means to complete weekly assignments. That online platform will help students relate what they learn to their everyday experience of active participants in the economic game. The course is divided into two modules, microeconomic and macroeconomic, and basic economic methodology is presented in both. Microeconomic topics include scarcity, opportunity costs, the law of diminishing returns, the trade principle of comparative advantage, the mechanism of the price system, the laws of demand and supply, the impact of market interventions by the government, etc. Macroeconomic topics include the forces undergirding the performance of the gross domestic product (GDP), the forces that influence inflation and unemployment, the role of fiscal and monetary policy, the workings of money and banking, the relevance of balancing the requirements of economic growth (efficiency in the use of inputs) with the necessity of attending to the needs of both society (need for equity) and the environment (need for sustainability), etc. (2-4 credit hours)

HC 326 | CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN/AMERICAN INDIAN ISSUES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Native Americans are part of our history and heritage, yet many Americans have little knowledge beyond stereotypes. While invisible to the mainstream, Native American cultures are surviving, striving, and in some cases, thriving as we enter the new millennium. This course will explore the complex issues facing Native Americans today through discussion, film, readings, and Native American news media to enable students to gain a cross-cultural perspective. Students will choose an area of focus on this subject and conduct independent research to present to their classmates. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 329 | MALE IDENTITY IN TRANSITION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course, open to men and women, examines issues of gender with a focus on male identity. You will examine your own perspectives, attitudes, and experiences in light of psychosocial development theory, media influences, power struggles among social groups, and relationship issues in an effort to gain a greater understanding of factors that influence male identity in today's society. The course is offered in a hybrid format, meeting every other week and interacting in an online course discussion between meetings. Projects to demonstrate competence will relate gender issues in power relations in the US, the impact of media, adult development and the workplace. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 344 | INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: A CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students will examine how cultural attributes shared by a society's members affect international affairs. Those attributes include ways of thinking and reasoning, styles of behavior and communication, and fundamental assumptions and values. The course is organized into three parts: an examination of American cultural patterns; an examination of cultural influences on human thought processes; and an examination of the cultural dimension of international negotiation through a comparison of Asian, European, Central American and the U.S. methods of reaching agreements. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 362 | POVERTY, POLICY AND THE ECONOMY: POOR IN THE USA | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore the history of efforts to help the poor in the United States. The impact of the economy and foreign policy upon support for government funded programs to assist low income persons will be evaluated. Students will engage in first hand learning by researching resources available to help those in need. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 365 | JAZZ AND CHICAGO | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This short course will introduce the student to the pleasures and enrichment of jazz. Students will learn what jazz is, learn about its fascinating history and some of its most influential players, and learn about the special role that Chicago has played-and still does play-in great jazz. In the classroom we'll hear records, view videos, engage the instructor in question-and-answer sessions, and hear stories about this unique musical art form and Chicago's ongoing role in it. The instructor, a jazz writer and longtime jazz drummer, will enliven the course with personal anecdotes covering a considerable part of Chicago jazz history. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 370 | AFRICAN SPIRITUALITY AND EDUCATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course involves an in-depth study of indigenous African educational practices and the spiritual values that support them. Indigenous Africans understand and live life as one whole, rather than seeing it as a compartmentalized experience of religion, spirituality, politics, economics, etc. Using Nelson Mandela's autobiography "A Long Walk to Freedom" and the instructor's book, "The Heartbeat of Indigenous Africa," the course will invite students to remember, reclaim, and re-tell their own stories of childhood experiences, educational experience, and life experience. Class work will include discussion, active story-telling and listening, projects, and writing. Out-of-class-work will include talking with and listening to selected elders such as storytellers, parents, grandparents, formators, counselors and others, in order to disclose and identify fundamental human virtues/values that are inherent in any holistic human formation process. (2-4 quarter hours)

HC 383 | PROMOTING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES | 2-6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How can we make our communities safer, cleaner, healthier places to live? We can design and offer programs in our communities that inspire and educate people to eat better, become more active and to fight for access to the care they need for themselves and their families. We can do that. This quarter, we will be working with an organization called Universidad Popular, a community organization that works to promote adult literacy and health in Chicago?s Little Village neighborhood, a primarily Mexican community. Their building at 2801 S. Hamlin is teeming with English classes for their Spanish speaking neighbors as well as Zumba and Yoga. Promotores (community health workers) get information out about prevention, health management and how to get access to health care with limited resources. We?re going to help them to evaluate their program by talking to participants about what they see as the health benefits. This course directs students to analyze an engaging topic from multiple perspectives in the liberal arts. Students strengthen their problem-solving skills by drawing upon the ideas and methods of three different liberal arts disciplines. The leaning activities clarify how the liberal arts can be put into action to solve problems. The course strengthens students? development of critical thinking and academic writing across the curriculum. Students also will learn about resources that will be useful for their academic success at DePaul. (2-6 credit hours)

HC 390 | APPLIED LEADERSHIP SKILLS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

As we approach the 21st century, a major change is occurring with respect to the age and make-up of the working population which can have a significant impact upon the management of people. Moreover, the challenges facing American managers today are not only profit/loss-oriented business decision-making tasks, but also the acquisition and improvement of new skills in working with people. The rules of the game for managers are indeed changing rapidly. This course will examine and address issues and concerns related to managing people, and offer a new constructive way of dealing with the seemingly intractable problems facing managers today. (2-4 quarter hours)