Secondary Education (SEC)

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SEC 309 | TEACHING AND LEARNING SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Prepares teacher-candidates for teaching mathematics at the middle school and secondary school levels. Examines contemporary issues in teaching mathematics, methods of teaching secondary mathematics, and recent history in mathematics curriculum development. Emphasis on the development of alternative teaching strategies and the implementation of the NCTM Standards. Lesson and unit development, evaluation, and classroom management also will be discussed. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 310 | TEACHING, HISTORY, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Prepares teacher-candidates for teaching history and social sciences at the middle and secondary school levels. Examines the nature and purpose of history and social sciences curriculum within secondary schools, the current status of social studies materials and practices, and issues confronting today's secondary social studies teachers. Emphasis on alternative teaching strategies, resources for teaching and learning, teachers' responsibilities in curriculum development and decision making, and methods and materials for addressing cultural diversity. Lesson and unit development, evaluation, and classroom management also will be discussed. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 311 | THE NATURE OF ENGLISH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to help students to see that the field of English Studies is bigger than the component they probably identify as English (its Literature, Writing, and Linguistics/Grammar). Students will explore the formation of the discipline up to the current day, focusing on the shifting understanding of ways of reading, writing and thinking about language. They will strive to answer the questions: What does it mean to be a student of language and literature? and, What are the ways of knowing writing, literature, and language? In doing so, students will relate their disciplinary content to their daily lives and interests and to the larger framework of human endeavor and understanding, including identifying its importance to the personal lives of high school students.

SEC 364, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 312 | THE NATURE OF HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course builds on the content course work students have done in the seven disciplines grouped under the heading "social sciences" (history, political science, geography, sociology, anthropology, economics, and psychology). In this class students will get further exposure to the basic concepts of the social science disciplines and consider the connections as well as differences between them. The course emphasizes how different disciplinary backgrounds lead students to bring different perspectives to their study of social phenomena and helps them see these phenomena from multiple vantage points. The course will employ a case study approach framed around social issues of interest to all seven disciplines (e.g. social control, threats, development, natural disasters). By the end of the course, students will have applied the knowledge and skills of multiple social science disciplines to evaluate social phenomena, considered the relationship and differences between those disciplines, and be prepared to enter SEC 322 where they will apply their content knowledge to inquiry and teaching in the field.

SEC 364, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 313 | THE NATURE OF MATHEMATICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course builds on students' mathematics understanding by emphasizing the universality of mathematics as a cultural endeavor. In it, students will explore the historical trends in mathematic and how those trends have been taught. Students will understand that, mathematics, at its core, is deductive; however, it also requires intuition. Thus, the course examines the interaction among intuition, experimentation, conjecture, abstraction, and deductive reasoning not only in the classroom but also in the everyday use of mathematics. It also examines the interplay between concrete problem-solving and generalization.

SEC 364, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 314 | THE NATURE OF SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is about the nature of science and the interactions between science and society. It will build on the foundation of understandings that students already have about the processes and conventions of science developed through their years as science students to create opportunities for deeper understandings of the beliefs and assumptions inherent to the creation of scientific knowledge. These opportunities will be developed through direct interactions with professional scientists as well as through case studies and readings that illustrate the strengths, limits and pitfalls of the scientific endeavor as well as provide opportunities for students to relate science to their daily lives and interests and to a larger framework of human endeavor and understanding (e.g., relationships among systems of human endeavor including science and technology; relationships among scientific, technological, personal, social and cultural values). Cases will be drawn from different scientific disciplines as well as from modern and historic times. In this way, science students will have a better understanding of what it means to be a scientist and how science interfaces with society. The course is a prerequisite for SEC 324.

SEC 364, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 321 | INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY ENGLISH PEDAGOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course builds on SEC 311 by preparing teacher candidates to distinguish between what needs to be taught (content) and how it is taught (pedagogy), with an emphasis on understanding the historical shifts in the teaching of content and how these shifts inform teaching and learning in today's English language arts classrooms. The course also introduces students to methods of inquiry and reflection on content pedagogical knowledge. Student will examine their own educational experience through the lens of the historical trends, focusing on how they learned and what they understood their teachers to be doing. This initial case study will serve as an introduction into case study methods. Students will also develop expertise in one of the three historical trend areas -reading, writing, and language - and examine how the trend has informed teaching and learning and shaped curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment. Students will develop a case study of a practicing teacher using the lens of the historical trend in which they are developing expertise. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364, SEC 311, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 322 | INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES PEDAGOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course builds on the content knowledge students developed and reinforced in SEC 312. More, it asks them to make the shift from considering how a person prepared in the social sciences analyzes social phenomena to how such a person teaches the social sciences. Students will do this by developing two units of inquiry-based case studies that they could use in their own classrooms. The topics of these case studies will vary from section to section, depending on the needs of the students and expertise of the instructor. Possible topics include the Constitution, the Cold War, slavery, and the Iraq War. As students work on these projects, they will continue to reflect on the course work they have done in the content areas as well as the instruction they see teachers delivering in their field experiences. They will contemplate such questions as: "What are the connections between the social science disciplines? How can they be taught together, creating interdisciplinary courses at the high school level? What are the differences between the social science disciplines and what does this mean for secondary pedagogy? How can teachers use inquiry with their students, making sure they have enough guidance to learn about social events but also the freedom to pursue their interests and make sense of the world on their own terms?" By the end of this course, students through readings and their projects will have advanced their learning about the nature of inquiry, its implementation in the classroom, and the connections and differences between the social science disciplines. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364, SEC 312, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 323 | INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY MATHEMATICS PEDAGOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course builds on SEC 313 by introducing students to inquiry methods to understand the teaching and learning of mathematics. Students will explore how mathematics has been and is taught by examining major paradigm shifts in mathematics education and the impact those paradigms and shifts have on pedagogical content knowledge, or knowledge of how to teach disciplinary content. Students will use case study methods to look at instructional practices and begin to articulate their own mathematics teaching pedagogy. With the completion of this course, students will have a deeper understanding of mathematical literacy and the barriers to understanding and teaching mathematics, as well as being able to identify what makes an exceptional math teacher who is able to address the needs of all students. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364, SEC 313, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 324 | INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY SCIENCE PEDAGOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Following SEC 314, this course transitions from asking "what does a scientist do?" to a consideration of why science literacy in the general public has been so difficult to achieve. The focusing questions for SEC 324 are: "How do we teach science? What is science literacy? Why is an understanding of science important to the general public? and What are the major obstacles and strategies to achieving science literacy?" The course begins by participants self-reflecting on their own educational experiences that led to their paths in science education: what have been their successful learning strategies, how have teachers influenced their education and what have been successful (and less than successful) classroom instructional strategies? From this, students will begin science classroom observation, discussing their observations with their peers, and speaking with educators about their experiences teaching high school science and about the goals and short-comings of science education. Throughout this process, students will read seminal literature on science literacy and explore cases challenging their notions of the teacher-learner relationship and the relationship between science and society. As a result of this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of scientific literacy and the barriers to understanding and teaching science as well as identify what makes an exceptional science teacher able to prepare both future scientists and a knowledgeable public. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364, SEC 314, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 325 | LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course explores the interrelationships between reading, writing, and other forms of communication (e.g., classroom talk, technology, visual arts) that are available to content area middle-level and high-school teachers. There will be an emphasis on the interrelationship of all aspects of language, oral and written, that result in literacy as a meaning-making tool in the construction of content-area knowledge. The course will discuss specific aspects of literacy processes from a multicultural, multilingual perspective as they apply to a variety of school settings in general and urban schools in particular. Students will become acquainted with theoretical issues as well as a wide range of literacy-teaching strategies including reading, writing, research, and study skills to be tailored to the needs of different students and to be applied across a variety of learning situations and text types. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

Senior status and SEC 371 or SEC 372 or SEC 373 or SEC 374 or status as a music education student is a prerequisite for this class. Exercise Science (BS) students are restricted from taking this class.

SEC 326 | TEACHING WRITING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course prepares teacher candidates for teaching writing and composition at the middle and secondary school levels. The course focuses upon methods of teaching composition, examination of literature and research about the composing process, the development of language and reading skills, and the assessment and evaluation of writing. The development of writing curriculums will also be explored. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 328 | TEACHING LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course prepares teacher candidates for teaching literature at the middle and secondary school levels. Examines contemporary issues in the teaching of literature, explores methods of teaching major literary genres, addresses problems of literacy and focuses on the transactional nature of reading and writing. Emphasis on developing a repertoire of ways of teaching literature and a variety of literature curriculums.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 329 | TEACHING YOUNG ADULTS LITURATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is devoted to the study of Young Adult Literature: an exciting, emerging genre of literature. Issues and ideas to be examined include the following: current debates regarding issues in curriculum and teaching; selecting, reading, evaluating, and teaching young adult literature; cultivation of life-long reading habits and literacy development. Students will become familiar with major writers of young adult literature, read diverse texts, explore major genres, review award winning novels, consider the role of the media, and develop creative projects. 20 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 339 | TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course prepares teacher-candidates for teaching science in the middle school and high school. This involves reviewing the processes of science, theories of learning, and instructional strategies appropriate to laboratory science. This course also provides an update on the current trends and issues in science education as well as an analysis of successful science curricula programs. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 363 | ORIENTATION TO SECONDARY TEACHING AS A PROFESSION | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(6 credits) In this process-oriented course, students engage in critical reflection on the roles and expectations of secondary educators from both institutional and community perspectives. Questions considered will include: what is an educator, what is a professional, what are the attributes of effective teachers, what do effective teachers do? Students will examine their own values and begin to develop their own philosophies about education and teaching. 30 Level 1 Field Experience hours at arranged sites. (6 credit hours)

SEC 364 | METHODS: CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(4 credits) This course will examine materials, methods, and techniques appropriate for teaching in secondary schools. Topics include: educational goals; the development of a rationale and underlying assumptions; instructional goals and objectives; learning objectives; both cognitive and affective; classroom environment; classroom management principles and techniques; multicultural materials in various content areas; the development of appropriate methods and materials; current curriculum issues and controversies. 30 Level 1 Field Experience hours at arranged sites.

Junior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SEC 365 | ART AND PEDAGOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course alongside SEC 366 is intended as a two course sequence each complimenting the other. As SEC 366 explores the source materials and major concepts of visual art's content, SEC 365 focuses on teaching visual art. Building from the content requirements from their program or experience, students will understand how the art studio (content) experiences where ideas are developed translate to the preparation of teaching. Students will do this through multiple curriculum based projects intended to use in their own classrooms, including a 6th - 12th grade general course reader to assist in introducing an art historical overview that influences and connects to general middle and high school studio practices. As students work on these projects, they will continue to reflect on the coursework they have done in the content area as well as watching and learning from classroom teachers and teaching artists in the field. They will contemplate such questions as: "What are the connections among the arts disciplines? How can they be taught together, creating interdisciplinary courses at the middle and high school levels? What are the differences among the arts disciplines and what does this mean for secondary pedagogy? How can teachers use inquiry with their students, making sure they have enough guidance to learn about artists, artistic periods and the nature of how artworks are produced. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 366 | TEACHER AS ARTIST | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course builds on the work in SEC 365, which alongside SEC 366 is intended as a two course sequence each complimenting the other. As SEC 365 focuses on the art of teaching the visual arts, SEC 366 explores the source materials and major concepts of visual art content. Historically, artistic movements have shaped and currently identify the theories we use to define our most immediate environment. The major concepts can be connected to the artist studio and to the descriptions some artists make about the studio as a teaching space. In the course students will be introduced to a wide range of artists and their work, artistic movements and the individual artists who use teaching as a medium. How does an emerging artist or pre-service teaching artist draw on the understanding of their own work as a platform to build core principles of pedagogy. What is the link that combines a dynamic studio practice with an inspired methodology for teaching visual art. We will address these questions through creating a visual art teaching curriculum portfolio and writing a reflective artist monograph, produce a final exhibition of their work and work alongside teachers and artists in the field. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.

SEC 364 and Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 371 | TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 1 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of teaching the English language arts in secondary classrooms. The course introduces candidates to research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills and sensibilities. Students will practice and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods, including the use of technology resources, that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. Students will reflect on their own emerging educational philosophies and theories. They will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required.

SEC 364, SEC 311, SEC 321, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 372 | TEACHING HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 1 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of teaching history and the social sciences in secondary classrooms. The course introduces candidates to research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the basic concepts of the seven social science disciplines. Students will practice and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods, including the use of technology resources, that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. Students will reflect on their own emerging educational philosophies and theories. They will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required.

SEC 364, SEC 311, SEC 322, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 373 | TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 1 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of teaching mathematics in secondary classrooms. The course introduces candidates to research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of mathematics in all its representations. Students will practice and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods, including the use of technology resources, that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. Students will reflect on their own emerging educational philosophies and theories. They will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required.

SEC 364, SEC 311, SEC 323, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 374 | TEACHING THE SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 1 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of teaching the sciences in secondary classrooms. The course introduces candidates to research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the different sciences, including biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics. Students will practice and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods, including the use of technology resources, that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. Students will reflect on their own emerging educational philosophies and theories. They will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required.

SEC 364, SEC 311, SEC 324, Junior status, and an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 381 | TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 2 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course continues students' immersion into the pedagogical content knowledge development and practices that began in SEC 321 and SEC 371. The course provides students opportunities to continue to explore and develop research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills and sensibilities, with an emphasis on reflective and collaborative practice. The course provides extensive opportunities for planning, using, and evaluating a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology resources, through teaching demonstrations and modeling and field experiences. Students will fine-tune and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. And like in SEC 371, students will reflect on and clearly articulate orally, in writing, and through practice an educational philosophy and theory. Students will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.

SEC 371 is a prerequisite for this course. This class is taken concurrently with SCU 351.

SEC 382 | TEACHING HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 2 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course continues students' immersion into the pedagogical content knowledge development and practices that began in SEC 322 and SEC 372. The course provides students opportunities to continue to explore and develop research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the basic concepts of the seven social science disciplines with an emphasis on reflective and collaborative practice. The course provides extensive opportunities for planning, using, and evaluating a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology resources, through teaching demonstrations and modeling and field experiences. Students will fine-tune and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. And like in SEC 372, students will reflect on and clearly articulate orally, in writing, and through practice an educational philosophy and theory. Students will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.

SEC 372 is a prerequisite for this course. This class is taken concurrently with SCU 351.

SEC 383 | TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 2 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course continues students' immersion into the pedagogical content knowledge development and practices that began in SEC 323 and SEC 373. The course provides students opportunities to continue to explore and develop research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of mathematics in all its representations with an emphasis on reflective and collaborative practice. The course provides extensive opportunities for planning, using, and evaluating a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology resources, through teaching demonstrations and modeling and field experiences. Students will fine-tune and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. And like in SEC 373, students will reflect on and clearly articulate orally, in writing, and through practice an educational philosophy and theory. Students will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.

SEC 373 is a prerequisite for this course. This class is taken concurrently with SCU 351.

SEC 384 | CAPSTONE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The senior capstone course is designed to help students integrate the central emphases of their liberal learning studies curriculum into their professional behavior. It will provide prospective elementary educators with opportunities to engage in activities requiring them to reflect, to consider value commitments, to use critical and creative thinking, and to examine their practice from a multicultural perspective as they discuss issues specific early childhood education. The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator, which also reflects the goals of the Liberal Studies program. COREQUISITE(S): SEC 390.

SEC 385 | TEACHING THE SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 2 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course continues students' immersion into the pedagogical content knowledge development and practices that began in SEC 324 and SEC 374. The course provides students opportunities to continue to explore and develop research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the different sciences, including biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics with an emphasis on reflective and collaborative practice. The course provides extensive opportunities for planning, using, and evaluating a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology resources, through teaching demonstrations and modeling and field experiences. Students will fine-tune and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. And like in SEC 374, students will reflect on and clearly articulate orally, in writing, and through practice an educational philosophy and theory. Students will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.

SEC 374 is a prerequisite for this course. This class is taken concurrently with SCU 351.

SEC 387 | CAPSTONE SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to help candidates integrate the central emphases of their Liberal Studies curriculum with their professional knowledge and behavior. It provides opportunities and activities to prospective educators that engage them in being analytic and reflective upon their major and related disciplines; guide them in further considering their value commitments and how they relate to their chosen profession; apply critical and creative thinking in addressing 'real-time' professional issues and needs; and examine extant practices from multicultural perspectives. Candidates develop a professional teaching portfolio that reflects the standards of the various guiding professional organizations and the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator as well as the goals of the Liberal Studies program. The course is taken simultaneously with student teaching. COREQUISITE(S): SEC 390. (2 credit hours)

SEC 390 | SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING | 10 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(10 credits) Five school days a week in supervised teaching in a cooperating school for a full academic quarter. Feedback and discussion of problems encountered in student teaching as well as new materials and techniques of student teaching. Application and approval required. Open only to DePaul students. (10 hours)

SEC 395 | ASSESSMENT ISSUES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces candidates to theoretical and philosophical issues related to educational assessment. It addresses the range of assessments teachers will encounter in school settings, including individual cognitive and social and emotional assessments; course material, curricula, and disciplinary program assessments; and large scale high-stakes testing. The course provides candidates opportunities to explore student, program, and curricular assessment issues, including assessment methods and tools; standardized, quantitative, and qualitative assessments; formal and informal assessments; formative and summative assessments; integrated, self-, and peer assessments; cultural, social, economic, and language influences on assessments; and issues of reliability and validity in assessment. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SEC 371/SEC 372/SEC 373/ SEC 374 OR SEC 381/SEC 382/SEC 383/SEC 384.

Exercise Science (BS) students are restricted from taking this class. This class is taken concurrently with (SEC 371 or SEC 372 or SEC 373 or SEC 374) or (SEC 381 or SEC 382 or SEC 383 or SEC 384).

SEC 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Permission of instructor, program chair and Associate Dean are required. (1 credit hour)