Latin American & Latino Studies (LST)

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LST 113 | LATINO RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of the diverse nature of Latino religion, from its indigenous roots to its institutional forms, within the social and political context of American culture. Cross-listed with REL 113. Formerly LST 290.

LST 121 | LATIN AMERICA TO C. 1765: PRE-COLUMBIAN SOCIETIES AND THE COLONIAL PERIOD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A survey of Latin American history that offers a continental approach to the colonial period. Special attention is given to Native American societies before 1492, to the Spanish conquest of Mexico and Peru, to the trade in African slaves (Spanish and Portuguese colonies), and to issues of race, class, and gender during the colonial period. Cross-listed with HST 121.

LST 122 | LATIN AMERICA, 1765-1914: THE LONG 19TH CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

One of the main goals of this course is for students to determine whether the long 19th century was an era of revolution and social change or a continuation of colonial institutions and policies. To address this broad question, the course focuses on the Bourbon Reforms, the Wars of Independence, the problems associated with nation building, and the neo-colonial order. Through the analysis of some individual countries (for example Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil) students will study key issues like slavery, the "India question," race relations, class formation, social inequalities, authoritarianism, Church-State relations, liberalism, subaltern resistance, and North-South relations. Cross-listed with HST 122.

LST 123 | LATIN AMERICA, 1914-2010 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with a basic and general knowledge of Latin American history from the 1910s to the present. The course highlights the challenges and failures the new republics faced. Due to the diverse historical experiences, cultures, and economic and political systems, the course will focus on the main social, political, and economic issues that shaped Latin America during the 20th century (democracy, social revolution, social justice, political violence, and repression). Cross-listed with HST 123.

LST 145 | ARTS OF THE AMERICAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is an introduction to major developments in art from the ancient indigenous cultures of the Americas (especially those of Meso- and South America), through the period of European colonialism (especially Spanish and English), to the modern art movements across the newly sovereign nations, including the United States and Canada. The broad chronology and geography necessitates a sampling of artistic forms across times, with issue-oriented lectures and occasional discussion. Cross-listed as HAA 145.

LST 200 | FOUNDING MYTHS AND CULTURAL CONQUEST IN LATIN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course challenges students to connect the cataclysmic formation of the Latin Americas from the cultures of Europe, Africa, and the Native (indigenous) peoples with the processes that inform our modern world. Colonialism, social stratification and forms of conflict and rebellion all played pivotal roles in the formation of Latin America from origins to the 18th century. The history and culture of the region is presented from many perspectives and across many disciplines.

LST 201 | STRUGGLE AND RESISTANCE IN LATIN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Latin America is more than a geographical reality. This interdisciplinary course asks how Latin America has been forged through local and global struggles for economic sovereignty, political self-determination, social and cultural identities in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Students will be introduced to the histories of economic dependence after the dawn of political independence, the intertwined dynamics of U.S. interventionism and Latin American resistance, the making of indigenous movements, as well as the interrelated issues of gender, race, and sexuality.

LST 202 | CONSTRUCTING LATINO COMMUNITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Latino Studies. It explores the socio-historical background of the major Latino groups in the United States, and the economic, political, and cultural factors that converge to shape Latino group identity. This course examines contemporary issues affecting Latinos including the evolution of Latino ethnicity, immigration, transnationalism and the formation of Latino communities, activism, and media representations of Latinos.

LST 203 | MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES ACROSS THE AMERICAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

LST 203 is an introduction to media and cultural studies with a specific focus on cultural transactions in the American hemisphere, particularly as they reflect the relationship of the U.S. to Latin America, Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. This course studies the history of national and cultural identities and social struggle, especially with regard to a north/south relationship, imperialism, revolution and social change, tourism, globalization, postcolonialism and the construction of gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity. Students examine how relationships across the Americas have been depicted in popular culture and the social and political meanings of these representations.

LST 204 | FILM AND LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An inquiry into the way film portrays historical events in Latin America. Cross-listed with HST 204.

LST 205 | MEXICO AFTER INDEPENDENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This survey covers the history of Mexico from 1821 to the present. It will examine the difficulties of nation-building during the 19th Century, the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940), and the success and failure of the "Mexican Miracle." Cross-listed with HST 200.

LST 206 | MEXICO: FROMTHE OLMECS TO INDEPENDENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys the history of Mexico from the rise of the Olmec Civilization to Mexican Independence in 1821. It will examine the rise, fall, and continuities of Mesoamerican civilizations, the Spanish conquest, and the creation of the colonial order. Cross-listed with HST 206.

LST 207 | AFRO-CARIBBEAN AND AFRO-LATIN AMERICA: PEOPLES, CULTURES, IDEAS AND MOVEMENTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the study of peoples of African descent in the Caribbean and Latin America through lenses of history, politics, and culture. Students will learn how racial identities are constructed and interpreted in the Americas and the ways these identities have shaped Latin American and Caribbean cultures, politics, and societies. This course will explore broad patterns, changes, and continuities in the history of the African Diaspora in the hemisphere through an analysis of various topics such as conquest, colonization, slavery, independence struggles, nation-building, imperialism, neo-colonialism, revolution, violence, social movements, and inter-American relations. Cross-listed with ABD 206.

LST 208 | JEWISH EXPERIENCES IN THE AMERICAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is about Jewish History in the Americas since 1492 until the late 1800s. It combines colonial/national periods and covers different regions, including North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Cross-listed with HST 202.

LST 209 | LATINOS/AS AND THE CRIMINAL LEGAL SYSTEM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The objective of this course is to examine the relationship between Latinos/as and the criminal legal system. Throughout the course, we will ask (1) what distinguishes Latinos/as from other racial and ethnic groups in the criminal legal system (2) and what Sociological/Criminological theories can help us understand the causes of these differences and inequalities. The course will examine key variables such as historical context, ethnic and race relations, and current criminal justice policy regarding Latinos/as in the United States. Cross-listed with CRIM 208.

LST 217 | WORK IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to make a direct connection between the needs and strategies of individuals, companies, industries, and nations regarding work, and how they interact to create specific work environments and work outcomes for individuals in a globalized world. The course emphasizes how globalization, by creating an international labor market and an environment of competition between nations to attract jobs, has deeply transformed the work experience of individuals and the quantity and quality of jobs available in the United States, Latin America, Asia, and the rest of the world. Cross-listed with SOC 217.

LST 218 | SPAIN AND PORTUGAL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A geographical exploration of Spain and Portugal's history, culture, politics and society. This course focuses on critical periods, events, and socio-political forces that substantially influenced these countries and demonstrate their role as one of Europe's key links to Latin America and Africa. Cross listed with GEO 218.

LST 243 | MAYA ART AND ARCHITECTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The "Classic Period" Maya (circa 0-900CE) are the source of modern interest for their graceful naturalism in a wide range of art forms and for their impressive architecture whose ruins today are found scattered across Southern Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. This class will explore the political, social, economic and religious imperatives behind the soaring temples, intriguing ballcourts, stately public sculptures, delicately painted vases, complex manuscripts and much more. We will situate the art of the Maya relative to other Mesoamerican cultures, particularly those of the Olmec, Teotihuacan and Aztec, and with respect to the Spanish colonial invasion. Other themes include aesthetics, materiality, gender, interpretive methodologies, and the impact of hieroglyphics and calendrics on the study of Maya art. Cross listed with HAA 243.

LST 244 | ART OF MESOAMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This survey of art of the ancient Mesoamerica (circa 1000BC-1520AD) focuses on the most artistically significant civilizations of Middle America and some of the difficulties encountered in studying them. Lectures explore visual traditions as diverse as the people they reflect; cultures to be covered include the Olmec, Maya, Teotihuacan, and Aztec. We consider the relationship between form and content, and the relationship between art and its social context, as much as we can understand it; however, especially because of the scarcity of primary source texts for the material, the class will also regularly raise questions of methodology in what is often identified as "pre-Columbian" scholarship. Cross-listed with HAA 244.

LST 245 | ART OF THE ANDES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This survey of art of the ancient Andes (circa 1000BC-1530AD) focuses on the most artistically significant civilizations of South America and some of the difficulties encountered in studying them. Lectures explore visual traditions as diverse as the people they reflect; cultures to be covered include the Nazca, Moche, Tiahuanaco, Wari and Inca of Peru. We consider the relationship between form and content, and the relationship between art and its social context, as we much as we can understand it; however, especially because of the scarcity of primary source texts for the material, the class will also regularly raise questions of methodology in what is often identified as "pre-Columbian" scholarship. Cross-listed with HAA 245.

LST 246 | ART IN THE SPANISH AMERICAN EMPIRE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course offers a critical survey of the art of colonial Latin America (circa 1520s-1820s), from the Caribbean to Mexico, Central America, and South America. Framed by the Spanish Conquest of the 16th century and Independence in the early 19th century, lectures will survey state-sanctioned arts of the Iberian colonizers, including the foundations of the Catholic Church across the "New World" landscape. Race will be a frequent issue of discussion as we consider both indigenous American and African participation in social realities and artistic practice in this colonial context.. Cross-listed with HAA 246 and CTH 250. Formerly LST 248.

LST 247 | ART OF THE ANCIENT AMERICAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This class surveys the art of the ancient Americas (circa 1000 BCE-1520 AD), with a focus on the most artistically significant civilizations of Mesoamerica and South America, and some of the difficulties encountered in studying them. Lectures will explore visual traditions as diverse as the people they reflect; cultures to be covered include the Olmec, Maya and Aztec of Mesoamerica, and the Moche and Inca of Peru. Since most of these cultures did not use the written word, the class will also regularly raise questions of methodology in pre-Columbian scholarship.

LST 249 | MODERN LATIN AMERICAN ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This lecture class is a survey of Latin American art created since the Wars of Independence which helped to create the modern nations in the 19th century (i.e. 1820s through the present). Lectures consider the struggle of artists to articulate newly sovereign identities through visual production, even as complicated relationships with Europe and increasingly, the United States, continue. Topics covered include Latin American modernism, surrealism, radical arts, and social realism, with a special consideration of post-revolutionary Mexican mural painting. Cross-listed with HAA 247.

LST 252 | LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of the history of Latin America and the major institutions, social sectors, and actors that shape the political life of the region. The course focuses on the development of revolutionary regimes and movements as well as military regimes and their demise during the transition to democracy. Cross-listed with PSC 252.

LST 268 | MEXICAN ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This survey situates the art of Greater Mexico in its rich historical context, from the territory on the eve of the Spanish Conquest to the early decades of the 21st century. From Aztec imperial art to colonial works, to efforts at nation-building through visual forms, the story of Mexican art is characterized by political and social change. Readings, lectures and discussion will touch on critical issues of race, class and gender, and take up themes such as miscegenation, indigenism, nationalism, and Mexico's place in the global art world. We will study famous works, such as the Aztec Calendar Stone, the Catholic image of the Virgin of Guadalupe, the post-revolutionary murals of Diego Rivera and the more intimate paintings of Frida Kahlo, but we will also consider less familiar art that has been equally important in the construction of Mexico and its identities. Cross-listed with HAA 248.

LST 285 | AFRO-HISPANIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this 200-level course in literature (for credit in the Arts and Literature learning domain of the Liberal Studies Program), we will seek to determine what distinguishes the Afro-Hispanic novel, short story, drama or poetry from other works in these genres. We will read works that have been translated into English from their original Spanish versions and analyze how the use of language, imagery and narrative voice reflect the experience of people of African descent in the Spanish-speaking world as seen (or heard) in the text and context of these works. In addition, we will explore how race, class, politics and culture interact and find expression in Afro-Hispanic literature. Cross-listed with ABD 285.

LST 290 | LATINO/A LIBERATION TRADITIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What does liberation mean in the context of the Americas today? How have people of Latin American descent -- both in Latin America and the United States -- connected conceptions of liberation to related ideas of liberty and freedom, as well as to notions of political revolution, cultural identity, and prophetic forms of religious faith? This course examines how these questions have been theorized across the Latino/a Americas, especially as they relate to questions of religion. Topics include liberation philosophy, critical pedagogy, prophetic religion, cultural praxis, Latina feminism, and decolonial thought. Cross-listed with REL 290.

LST 291 | LOOKING FOR GOD IN LATIN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of religious traditions such as Catholicism, indigenous religions, and Protestantism in Latin America, with special focus on how these traditions have been transplanted and reshaped upon entry into varied Latino communities in the United States. Historical analyses of the Latin American roots of these traditions will provide contextualization for the ongoing examination of transnational religious cultures in the U.S. Cross-listed with REL 291.

LST 297 | IMPERIAL SPAIN, 1469-1808 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analysis of Spain and Spanish empire between 1468-1808. During this period, Spain united and became a leading global power with enormous consequences for Western and world history. Emphasis on the political, economic, socio-cultural history of Iberian society. Cross-listed with HST 297.

LST 300 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES.

LST 303 | BORDER MATTERS:LITERATURE & CULTURE IN THE LATINO/A BORDERLANDS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course we will study the values and dynamic that is promoted in different Latino communities in the United States. In order to give context to the present situation of Latinos in the U.S. we will study some of the social issues in the countries of origin which have resulted in immigration and their encounter with borderlands. The notion of a Latina and Latino cultural "borderlands" has proven a ubiquitous and powerful conceptual paradigm in recent years, organizing distinct ethnic groups (Cuban American, Mexican American, Central American, Puerto Rican, etc.) according to the rubrics of pan-ethnic identity labels (Hispanic, Latina/Latino, etc.) and transnational geographies (Latin America, the Americas, etc.). This course will examine a wide range of Latino/a literary expressions produced in the Latina/Latino borderlands, particularly in areas of cultural contact and conflict. While the most obvious focus will be the Texas-Mexico border region, including ongoing efforts to establish the public meaning of the Alamo, additional borderlands, literal and figurative, will be considered. The Latina and Latino borderlands have also inspired critics and theorists to imagine postmodern, post national subject formations, in which questions of ethnicity, gender, and sexuality are shifted from the margins to the center of critical discourse. We will therefor investigate the use and limits of recent "border theory".

LST 305 | LATINO COMMUNITIES AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In-depth, critical examination of different Latino communities. Topics include: Mexican-American Community, Puerto Rican Community and Cuban-American Communities.

LST 306 | LATINO COMMUNITIES IN CHICAGO | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course studies Latino Communities, focusing on their cultural and historical constructions from a community based learning experience.

LST 307 | GROWING UP LATINO/LATINA IN THE U.S. | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A critical as well as a community based examination of the experiences of growing up as a Latino/Latina person in the United States.

LST 308 | MOTHERHOOD IN LATINO COMMUNITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is an intellectual, as well as a community based exploration of motherhood in Latino communities and the theories of motherhood in feminist criticism throughout Latin America. Other topics: fatherhood, the extended family and the community as family.

LST 309 | SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND LATINO FAMILIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Social Engagement And Latino Families.

LST 310 | SPECIAL TOPICS: LATINOS IN THE U.S. | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

SPECIAL TOPICS: LATINOS IN THE U.S.

LST 311 | CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Contemporary Issues And Social Engagement.

LST 312 | LATINA/O SEXUALITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course the construction of sexuality as experienced by Latina/as will be examined through the analysis of recent interdisciplinary scholarship, literary selections and other popular cultural forms. We consider how gender and sexuality are constructed, enacted, represented, and communicated in a range of Latino/a communities and subcultures. Our analysis of readings/films/music will allow us to understand the changing and contested meanings of gender and sexuality within Latino/a culture.

LST 321 | GLOBALIZATION IN THE AMERICAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, we examine the processes of globalization in the Americas. The world seems to be a smaller place--accessible through the internet and global markets--and national borders seem to be more porous than ever before. Various agents--corporations, people, political organizers and organizations--are able to work on a global scale. Many critics argue that globalization has created a larger division between the wealthy and the poor. How has globalization affected the way we live our lives? In this course, we discuss the many debates around globalization and the political situation in Latin America, North America, and the Caribbean as well as the global justice movements that address inequity and injustice. You will become familiar with these debates and their histories, particularly with the growing anti-globalization position taken by many political leaders in Latin America. In this course, you will take a position regarding this contemporary political arena and become well-acquainted with various trends, policies, and activist movements around globalization. You will analyze your place in this political arena and determine how you will negotiate your position. We discuss the impact of various international organizations and trade agreements, from IMF, the World Trade Organization, the UN, the Organization of American States, NAFTA, and the Free Trade Area of the Americas. We will analyze the protest movements in Cancun and Seattle. We look at the increasing tourist apartheid in different parts of the Americas, particularly in the Caribbean. We discuss the impact and organization of international activism from anti-globalization movements to global justice movements. We will discuss and debate strategies for resistance. We access many of these issues through cultural productions (film, tv, advertisements, etc) that address the difficult dilemmas of neo-liberalism (rule of the market).

LST 322 | MEXICAN CINEMA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course we analyze the history and practice of a national cinema in relation to government film policy, filmmaking practices and programs, intellectual and cultural context, and national and popular concerns. We study various facets of Mexican cinema from conceptions of race/gender/sexuality, major figures of cinema, and the current conditions of Mexican Cinema. We will explore Mexican Cinema in relation to other film industries of the Americas, especially in relation to the United States and Hollywood and to the oppositional political practices of the New Latin American cinema of the sixties and seventies.

LST 323 | URBAN LATIN AMERICA: LABOR, HOUSING, ENVIRONMENT AND GENDER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines global, national, and local economic, political, and social structures and processes impacting urban individuals in Latin American societies. For example, it examines economic globalization and the opening of borders to foreign goods and its impact on industries and employment of individuals. It also examines the influence of global and local real estate market on the ability of urban individuals to obtain affordable housing. The resulting segregation leads to an unequal urban society with certain neighborhoods gaining access to adequate public services. This course will not however only look at urban problems and their structural causes but also on how individuals and groups of individuals are working to solve these problems caused by both local and global political and economic institutions. The solutions sought may differ from country to country due to different cultural understandings, local structures, historical legacies, and actors involved. This course will explore case studies of urban communities in a variety of Latin American countries including, but not limited to, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Ecuador.

LST 330 | LATINOS IN EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines historical and current issues related to the education of Latinos in the US that range from PK-12 to higher education. The course explores the sociolinguistic, historical, sociocultural, legal and political contexts that shape the educational experiences of Latinos in the US, paying particular attention to policy and the current state of affairs in the education of Latinos. The Latino Diaspora will also be explored.

LST 336 | EXPERIENCING MEXICAN ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The history of Mexican art in the Modern era. Some sections of this course will engage students in studio problems that address specific issues in the history of Mexican culture.

LST 338 | COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will survey painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in the Americas from contact with Europe up through independence movements of the 19th century. Special attention will be given to the intersection of artistic production with broad social, economic and political trends.

LST 348 | INDIGENOUS POLITICAL STRUGGLES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the struggles for social justice and the right to have rights by indigenous peoples. It emphasizes contemporary cases and the cultural contexts in which indigenous political strategies have developed and transformed. It uses historical data to understand the issues faced by indigenous peoples. Students conduct research on indigenous struggles and their connections to other social movements at the local, national, and international levels.

LST 358 | REVOLUTIONS AND PEASANT REBELLIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Analyzes the most important revolutions and peasant rebellions of the twentieth century as well as the most relevant cases from previous periods, such as the French Revolution. Cross-listed with SOC 358 and INT 319.

LST 375 | MEXICO CITY (WORLD CITIES) | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

From its origins as Tenochtitlan, the preordained capital of the Aztec Empire, through its identification as a "new Rome" dominated by the Spanish Crown in the Viceregal period, to its status as the largest metropolitan area in the Western Hemisphere (and the second largest in the world), Mexico City was born to impress the imagination. This class explores the development of the great city of Mexico in light of major historical events and cultural expressions. Discussions will focus especially on urban planning, key architecture, outdoor sculpture, and public spectacles over the centuries. Cross-listed with HAA 375.

LST 389 | LATIN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What does it mean to speak of Latin American philosophy? What is the difference between merely doing philosophy in Latin America and doing Latin American philosophy? These are issues that some thinkers in Latin America grapple with. This course will explore the history and nature of Latin American philosophy. Moreover, we shall examine some of the reasons why, in sharp contrast to the European and Anglo-American philosophical traditions, questions of the very existence of an autochthonous Latin American philosophical tradition are heatedly debated both in Latin America and beyond. Cross-listed with PHL 389.

LST 390 | SENIOR SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A capstone course that integrates the student's prior course work and experiences by allowing the student to define a final culminating project. The seminar functions as a coordinated independent study course with extensive participation of Latin American and Latino Studies Program faculty.

LST 392 | INTERNSHIP | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

INTERNSHIP.

LST 394 | THESIS | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

THESIS.

LST 395 | TRAVEL/STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

TRAVEL/STUDY.

LST 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

INDEPENDENT STUDY.