Arts and Ideas (AI)

Menu

AI 107 | BUDDHIST MINDFULNESS MEDITATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This 5 session (2 credit hour) course introduces theories and practices of mindfulness meditation from Buddhist traditions. It explores how mindfulness meditation can enhance collaboration learning, address the fundamental ethical challenges of contemporary life, and relate to work experience. Class sessions will involve practice in mindfulness meditation. Students will be expected to maintain and reflect on a daily mindfulness meditation practice for the duration of the course. The assessment of learning will be based on class participation and weekly reflection papers.

AI 108 | INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: WEAPONS, WARS AND A WORLD IN TURMOIL | 2-6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Today, world politics is making an unpredictable turn and undergoing an historical transition. International relations in the 21st century are more complex and facing more pressing global challenges than the previous century. While the Western nations have enjoyed unparalleled prosperity in recent years, developing nations, mired in debt, burdened in poverty, riddled with diseases ranging from malaria to AIDS, plagued by wars and genocide, are struggling to overcome crisis. This course will examine the role of nation-states, international organizations like the United Nations, international law, international crimes court, treaties, and root causes and functions of war and peace in the making of foreign policies that have shaped and reshaped the relationships among nations. We will also focus on ethics in the context of a number of issues and practices in international relations ranging from global inequality, the promotion of human rights, foreign aid, immigration/forced deportation, humanitarian intervention, to terrorism, genocide, war crimes, and the use of torture. Bridge Course. Can be taken for up to 3 competences.(2-6 quarter hours)

AI 115 | THE CULTURE OF CHRISTMAS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will use examples of contemporary writing and popular art as our windows into the changes to 19th century Christmas Culture. We look at the influx of immigrant Christmas tradition (both in terms of religious and national origin practices that provided the rich selection of cultural choices. We look at the social setting of the wealthy vs. the poor and the urban dweller vs. the settler to see how these affected Christmas practices. (2 quarter hours)

AI 121 | ART AND MEMORY: SCRAPBOOKING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Art is appreciated in various forms. In homes all over America, dining room tables are filled with tiny metal hearts, pictures of adorable toddlers, bags of stickers, and 500 varieties of lettering. Scrapbooking is one of the nation's fastest growing artistic leisure time activities. Millions of dollars are invested in this peculiar pastime that focuses on not only recording family events, but making them pretty as well. Most of us do not consider ourselves artists, but give us a pair of scissors and some fancy paper and we will create an artistic masterpiece! Students in this experience will learn about the history of scrapbooks and will begin the process of decoding the relationships of creativity, art, and craft in this pursuit that is sweeping the nation. Topics will include the definition of scrapbooking and its development in American culture; the ways in which art and craft intersect in the scrapbook; how to get started with a scrapbook; the nature of creativity and its impact in scrapbooking; and the construction of meaningful works of art and craft. This course will meet on campus and online via D2L. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 143 | ROOTED IN THE CITY: WRITERS & WRITING IN CHICAGO | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Who are the writers rooted in Chicago? What were and are their concerns, themes, styles? How can they teach us about the city, but also about writing? In this class, students will read, discuss and write about work written by such Chicago writers as Nelson Algren, Gwendolyn Brooks, Stuart Dybek, Sandra Cisneros, Studs Terkel, Marc Smith, and Mike Royko. We will consider the nature of civic engagement and creativity in the literary arts, as well as pay close attention to the formal elements of the poems, short stories, and essays read in this class. We?ll also explore how these texts compel us to think about power and its circulation in cultural as well as social contexts. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 147 | ETHICS: HOW GOOD PEOPLE MAKE TOUGH CHOICES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Through life's many lessons, we have learned how to make a decision between what is the right thing to do and what is simply wrong. We can differentiate between good and evil, truth and lies, etc. However, most of our dilemmas do not stem from deciding the correct path, when we are faced with right and wrong decisions. What most often puts us into a quandary is deciding between what is right and what is right. In other words when good people are faced with tough choices, on what basis do they make their decisions? In an era of perceived ethical incertitude and moral skepticism, students will examine how decisions are made based on one of many ethical systems. Students will learn about various ethical systems, and ethicists, such as utilitarianism, deontology, Kant, Aristotle, and Gillian, just to name a few. By the end of the course students should be able to apply their knowledge of moral, ethical and social issues, and have a better understanding of how the tough decisions they make could impact others. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 152 | EXPLORING THE ART MUSEUM | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Museums have been a respected and trusted measurement of artistic accomplishment. In this course, the student will examine the museum's role as collector, conservator and educator. The student will investigate the traditional role of the art museum, its collection, practices and programs as well as its efforts to integrate new media into its collection. The course also investigates repatriation, which is the ownership of ancient and cultural heritage and other issues that affect the museum such as censorship and funding. Finally it will look at how we value art as a commercial commodity. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 153 | THE ART OF SPEECHMAKING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this class, students will use tools based in the imagination, principles of design, and standard dramatic practice to create a unique, personal experience for an audience. Speech, whether we call it dramatic or declamatory, has the potential to move the masses. In this course, you will develop a personal approach and construct effective presentations that harness the power of their voice and body. (2 credit hours)

AI 155 | ANALYZING LEADERSHIP | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides a framework from which to identify and analyze 'leadership. Leadership occurs in all aspects of life, including: business, politics, sports, society, religion, family, education, and culture. But what is leadership? The Merriam-Webster on-line dictionary defines leadership as "the act or an instance of leading," which provides us with little insight. On further investigation, however, the dictionary defines "lead" as [guide] on a way especially by going in advance. Where there is a leader, then, someone or something must follow. This course first explores the interrelationship between a leader and his or her followers and looks at the effect they have on each other. "Good" leadership traits (i.e., effective) and "bad" leadership traits (i.e., ineffective) are then studied from the perspectives of the leaders, the followers, and outsiders. Finally, this course takes a look at leadership from an international perspective. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 157 | ENGLAND: CATHEDRALS, A PILGRIMAGE | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The inspiration and faith which combined to produce the magnificent cathedrals in England are worthy subjects of study for students of art, history, architecture and religion. This Spring Break study abroad course brings students to some of the most important cathedrals in the world to provide opportunities for such important study. On this program, participants will gain valuable understandings of religion, art, and culture as they simultaneously engage with present day British culture and attempt to unravel its rich and complex past. SNL Students must register for three to four competencies between the two quarters. For more information, please visit the study abroad website or contact the instructor. (2-6 quarter hours)

AI 160 | IT'S ONLY ROCK AND ROLL: MAKING MUSIC THE OLD FASHIONED WAY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

For many, music is an integral part of everyday life. It is also deeply ingrained in most cultures. Music is used by individuals, businesses and societies to entertain, soothe, excite, and arouse. Music is basically a series or combination of pleasing sounds but how is music made? How do we know what is pleasing and what is not? The answers to these questions and others demonstrate that music is also a field where science and art meet. In this class, we will explore how sound is physically created and how specific sounds have been turned into music over the centuries. Through experimentation, we will examine the physical and mathematical properties of sound and musical instruments. We will also create simple musical instruments and share the experience of creating musical pieces. No musical experience is needed to take this class. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 164 | CREATIVITY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What is creativity? Where does it come from? Do we all have it? Can we cultivate it? These questions and more will be explored as we define the concept of creativity; identify, analyze, and describe the components of a creative process in varied fields; and, explain how engaging in a creative process affects our perception of the world.(2-4 quarter hours)

AI 167 | DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students learn in this course to take artistic digital photos. They will analyze photos they have taken prior to the course and discuss if they fulfill criteria to be seen as art. Several theories of artistic expression will be discussed. Rules of composition, light, exposure, colors, etc. will be reflected upon. In a second step the students will develop the competence to alter their digital photos with a program like "Photoshop Elements". They will be able to change the expression of their photos and combine different shots, creating their personal piece of art. As a final product, students will create a portfolio with about 5 photos including detailed descriptions of their work. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 168 | ART AND MEMORY SCRAPBOOKING II: THE ART JOURNAL | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the second course on the art and craft of scrapbooking offered in the SNL curriculum. This course focuses on a specific aspect of the scrapbooker's art, the production of embellished personal diaries. Throughout this experience, students will critically examine the artistic aspects of journaling and collage artwork, investigate movements in the art world, chronicle events in their lives through photographs and narrative, and create works of art and craft that illustrate the experience. This is a hands on art making course. While faculty will discuss various techniques and information about assessing works of art and putting them in the context of art movements, students should expect to be introduced to art making materials and to use them during class time. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 170 | CREATIVITY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

IPads. Smart Phones. The automobile. These inventions, once unknown and now taken for granted, required years of imagining, experimentation and innovative thinking. While we value the end product, we are often unaware of the underlying creative/creating process. This class will explore the role of creativity in the development of entrepreneurial skills and the entrepreneurial personality. Creativity in this course will be seen both as a learned skill and as an exploration of our intuition. This course will explore contemporary approaches to the creative process based on the human capacity to imagine, to explore and, ultimately, to create. These are core skills for anyone pursuing a career as an entrepreneur or simply in search of ways to explore innovation. (2 credit hours)

AI 172 | MAKING POEMS: AN INTRODUCTION TO VERSE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Making poems will be a creative writing offering that teaches metrics and verse forms, poetry the old-fashioned way. Topics will include metric feet, rhyme, lines, and verse forms. For example, students will learn about the iambic foot, write some iambic lines of various lengths, and finally use the iambic line to write a sonnet. Rap poetry with its structured rhythms and elaborate rhyming is another possibility. This "formalist" approach promotes a kind of creativity that is strongly infused with craft and discipline in contrast to the "spoken word" or confessional approaches to making poems. This class involves making audio recordings of your poems; students will be required to purchase a headset/microphone and download and install free software. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 176 | CREATIVE WRITING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Designed to help you explore the art of writing stories, either stories that are "made-up" or stories based on lived experience. You will be required to complete six fiction-writing exercises, and either one short story, one autobiographical story, or one story based on an oral history collected by the you. In addition, you write a final essay in which you reflect on your learning and experience in the course. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 181 | CREATING ORIGINAL DIGITAL ART | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will focus on electronic visual art, and because of the amount of material to be covered, will not include audio or animation art. Student will look at what constitutes "art", then look at how original art could be created using technological tools, such as Microsoft Paint, Pixel-based art, such as Microsoft Graphics in PowerPoint; Digital Photography and PhotoShop; digital short-movies, and Digital Animation using Freeware GIF Animation software. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 183 | THE 1960S | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The decade of the 1960s was a watershed period in the social, cultural, and political history of the United States. This course will examine the era from a variety of viewpoints in order to promote student understanding and analysis of key movement, episodes and personalities. The course will include investigation of John F. Kennedy's "New Frontier", The Cold War, The Space Race, the Civil Rights and Women's Liberation movements, Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society", the Vietnam War, popular culture, literature, student unrest, and the realignment of traditional political voting blocks. In addition, the course will demonstrate how the decade's music mirrored the changing times. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 185 | THE BEATLES AND THE CREATIVE PROCESS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Beatles are significant in many ways: they were an unprecedented show business phenomenon; they were leaders of Sixties cultural rebellion; and they stand, for many, as a signal instance of popular entertainment attaining the status of high art. This course will examine the musical craftsmanship of the Beatles, focusing on their work as songwriters and record makers. Recent audio and print releases documenting the group's performing and recording history provide a unique and detailed glimpse of the Beatles' creative process. We will utilize these materials to closely trace the development of the group's work while using other resources to place it in a larger historical and cultural context. The goal is to shed critical light on this recent chapter in cultural history. That discussion will, in turn, highlight questions about creativity in a modern context where commerce vies with art, technology redefines performance and an emerging global village culture transforms concepts of originality and tradition. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 187 | CAREERS IN THE HELPING PROFESSIONS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will help you, the learner, identify which career path best fits your strengths, skills, and interests, as you pursue your desire "to help people" It will also better prepare you for graduate and/or professional training by familiarizing you with the admissions process for various schools in the helping professions (e.g. social work, psychology, counseling, etc.) (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 190 | AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE ARTS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The arts provide a lens through which we can more completely see, hear and understand the magic, mystery and challenge of the human experience. The story of African Americans in this country is one of perseverance and transformation. In this course, students will explore how the social, political, historical and cultural journey of African Americans is reflected in the production of art. African Americans have a specific perspective on the American national experience. Where would America be without the artistic contributions of the African American cultural community? Furthermore, how does art make our lives better? Does it? In this course, learners will research, analyze, and define African American art and arts and assess their impact on culture. Arts such as theatre, literature, music, and visual and media arts will be discussed. Students should expect to attend several cultural/artistic events throughout the term. These might include poetry readings, musical concerts, theatre, gallery visits, and other local events. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 192 | IMPROVISATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students will learn the games that form a context with which, or from which, to improvise. Then they will improvise; they will play in their own and in each others' improvised sketches. They will learn to solve problems, find metaphors and examine improvisation as an excellent tool with which to monitor the process of learning. From the engagement in games and their analysis will come the most important outcome: the growth of confidence. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 193 | LANGUAGE AND POLITICS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The language that individuals and groups use to tell their stories creates their identities. This multi-disciplinary course examines how post-modern language, especially language in media, frames national and global politics and its underlying power relationships. Issues addressed include the politicization of language in the U.S. immigration debate and the role that English as global lingua franca plays in spreading American culture as well as the subsequent effects on self-expression in English among native speakers via political correctness, forbidden speech and code words. Other topics include gender roles, intellectual property rights, and even the overall need for virtually ceaseless verbal stimulation in a media/image driven world. Students will utilize intercultural communication theories to reflect upon their self-identity and its role in defining their relationship to their communities and institutions and will expand outward to understand national and ethnic identities from a global perspective. Students examine current events in the media and the ethical implications language-related biases impose upon discourse while using the Internet to create their own presentation about the topic. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 196 | WRITENOW:SNL WRITING MARATHON | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Anne Lamott said that the most important ingredient for writing is the act of "sitting". In this course, students will focus on this seemingly simple act of the creative process. The focus of the course is on the generation of written material: the quantity rather than the quality. As such, students choose their own fiction or nonfiction writing topic(s) and project, and may use the material they create in a later effort (ILP, AP, etc.) To kick off one session, a group of professional writer panelists will reflect on their own creative processes as they have developed their latest works. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 200 | GUIDED INDEPENDENT STUDY: ARTS AND IDEAS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Guided Independent Study: Arts and Ideas (2 quarter hours)

LL 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

AI 202 | LONDON ALIVE: IN THEATERS, MARKETS AND MUSEUMS | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Join SNL in London for a course about performance and representation. Theater, live performance, museum collections and street markets are integral parts of English cultural history; they also represent Britain's international heritage. London theaters celebrate English history, culture and language, and carry the banner of the English artistic imagination into the future. London's museums make it one of the most visited cities in the world for the range of its collected artifacts and images. Outside the theater and museum doors, markets teem with life, creating a magical intersection of past with present and future, of art with life and politics, of cultural stasis with social change. (2-6 quarter hours)

AI 203 | ART AND TRANSFORMATION | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What?s the difference between change and development? Between action and inspiration? Between mobility and transition? Between planned change and transformation? If you can answer all those questions, try this: What?s the difference between the creative contributions of painter Leonardo da Vinci and CEO Walter Isaacson? This course explores how art can serve as a guidepost during key phases in the adult experience, especially those involving transition periods like healing, growth, and personal and professional change. Students look at cases of major change agents throughout history who became catalysts for cultural transformation in part because of the impact of important works of art. The students will engage with diverse examples of art that have influenced important thought leaders and change agents of the past and present to become catalysts for major transformations in the human experience. Students will learn how significant products of the creative process? in this case, great works of art?can encapsulate, reflect, and even activate the process of personal as well as social change, and how each of us can participate in the alchemical process of reflection, inspiration, and action that can result in transformation of inner and even worlds. Art and Transformation introduces learners to a variety of works of art and the people they influenced, a group that will eventually include the learners themselves. It presents a range of ways to approach the arts and to use them as tools of inspiration, self-reflection, communication, and growth. Divided into four units (Art and Personal Transformation, Art and Cultural Transformation, Art and Leisure, and Art and Work), the class presents multidisciplinary examples of literature (poetry, fiction, essays, memoir), as well as film and other visual arts. Students will consider art both from the perspective of the artist him/herself as well that of major thought leaders and change agents whose contributions to society have been motivated by an engagement with art that acted as a catalyst for system shifts in areas of-personal and cognitive growth, cultural and political change, as well as the transformation of the world of work in the 21st century. Ultimately this course is an investigation of art itself as a change agent that has much to tell us about the past, the present, and ourselves. (2-4 hours)

AI 204 | CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURSHIP | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

IPads. Smart Phones. The automobile. These are inventions, once unknown and now taken for granted, required years of imagining, experimentation and unconventional thinking. While we value the end of the process (the product), we are often uncomfortable with the creative/creating process. The process of imagining, conceptualizing and articulating this `new? requires skills we often label `creative?. This class will explore the role of creativity in the development of entrepreneurial skills and the entrepreneurial personality. Creativity in this course will be seen both as a learned skill and as an exploration of our intuition. Contemporary ideas about creativity are often tied to images of the past - from mad scientists to mystical muses. But modern science tells us something else about the creative mind. This course will explore contemporary approaches to the creative process based the human capacity to imagine, to explore and ultimately, to create. These are core skills for anyone in pursuing a career as an entrepreneur, or simply in search of ways to explore innovation. In this course, we will examine the ideas of three major thinkers form the world of creativity, disruption and entrepreneurship. We will then explore where these ideas converge on topics including, risk, the random, intuition and innovation. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 207 | THE LITERATURE OF INCARCERATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The United States is the largest incarcerator in the world. Is this because we have more crime? More criminals? In this course we will explore questions about the prison industrial complex and the justice system through the words of incarcerated and formerly-incarcerated writers. We will be looking at poetry, short stories, essays, and memoirs. Employing a mix of discussion, guest speakers, film, class team reports, and close readings of the literary texts, this course will take us on an imaginative journey into a world most of us have few reasons to understand. We will explore questions about the prison industrial complex and the justice system through the words of incarcerated and formerly-incarcerated writers.

AI 209 | ETHICS AND IDENTITY: THE PRESSURE OF INSTITUTIONS ON INDIVIDUALS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the tension between the individual and the institution in theory (through books and films) and practice (through participation in collaborative groups) and offers the student real tools for working with integrity inside the corporate culture. Using current events as a modern morality play upon which to turn the lens of historical and contemporary analysis, we will ask of ourselves what it means to be a good and ethical citizen. This course will enable students to recognize the inherited belief systems and their contradictions which have fueled the moral crisis of the last decade. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 211 | ANALYZING AUSTEN'S PRIDE AND PREJUDICE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Jane Austen must have known something about universal truths. Her novel, Pride and Prejudice, which begins with the sentence quoted above, was first published in 1813. Still in print today, it has also been made into at least eleven movies, four of which were released since 2000, including a Mormon and a Bollywood version. In this class, we will read the novel in the context of the gender and class norms at the time Austen wrote her book and then consider how Austen's exploration of universal truths is reinterpreted in more contemporary film versions of this novel. In exploring Austen's creation and the many reinterpretations of her work, we will use both analytic and creative writing assignments as well as class discussion to examine how context informs creativity and how creativity informs analysis. You most definitely do not need to be a creative writer to take this class. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 215 | FILM NOIR | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course we will screen and discuss select noir films and develop skills of viewing and analyzing them closely. Highlighted topics will include the concept of genre in film; the relationship of genre codes to creativity; the dynamics of form and content; the tension between commerce and art; the auteur theory; psychologies of the divided self; representations of masculinity and femininity; and the question of what these films say about American society, post-World War II. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 217 | MINDFULNESS MEDITATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Mindfulness mediation provides many different ways to broaden our awareness of the world around us, heighten our powers of concentration, deepen our under-standing of our experience, and cultivate creative and transformative ways of being in the world. Many approaches to mindfulness meditation draw on ancient religious and spiritual traditions from around the world. So mindfulness meditation is compatible with and can enhance whatever religious or spiritual commitments you may have. But mindfulness meditation does not require religious or spiritual interpretations. It can be practiced as a very powerful path to becoming a creative, healthy and effective adult. In this course, you will learn what mindfulness meditation is and various ways in which it can be practiced. We will explore in particular how mindfulness meditation can enhance creativity, address the ethical challenges of contemporary life, and foster collaborative learning. Class sessions will involve extensive practice in mindfulness meditation, listening and dialogue. You will be expected to maintain and reflect on a daily mindfulness meditation practice for the duration of the course. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 225 | GREAT MUSIC IN CHICAGO | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course introduces people to three of the most exciting and rewarding institutions in Chicago music: the world-famous Chicago Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Center downtown; the fabulous training orchestra of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, known as the Civic Orchestra, also downtown; and live top-name jazz at the Jazz Showcase. We learn the background of these institutions, the nature of the arts they perform, and the terms used to describe and appreciate those forms. Most importantly, we experience, in person, the great music that they play! (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 232 | THEATER IMPROVISATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course we will play on the classroom stage as we might have played on the playground as kids. The difference between these forms of play is one of degree rather than one of kind. A theater game provides a structure in which we can play spontaneously. In other words, we improvise. Improvisation aids in the developing of public speaking skills and comfort and confidence as well as other social and theatrical skills. May be taken for only one competence. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 239 | DANCE AS EXPRESSION OF CULTURE: SALSA DANCING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Ever since the foundational work of Margaret Meade in the 1950s, cultural anthropologists prefer to leave the library and go into the field to experience a new culture by engaging with its language, arts, and/ or customs. People who travel to new places and respond to the local art in its natural setting know the power of experiential engagement with another culture. This course offers students a similar opportunity to embrace and express the values of other culture in an enjoyable way but without the need of a passport. Since the beginning of recorded history and almost certainly before, cultural groups around the world have produced some sort of rhythmically structured physical movement, often but not always set to music, in order to express essential things about themselves and their values. Dance is one of the oldest of art forms. As an eternal and universal mode of expression, dance is one of the most powerful conduits for cultural values. In this class students will be exposed to forms of the art of salsa dancing and the Latin American cultural contexts that produced those forms. They will study and also express the values of the cultures that gave us salsa as they participate in culture infused medium of dance.(2-4 quarter hours)

AI 247 | STAGE IMPROVISATION AND GAME PLAYING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Improvisational comedy is social commentary or personal expression made immediate by spontaneous dramatization. Students will learn the games that form a context with which, or from which, to improvise. Then, they will improvise; they will play in their own and in each others' improvised sketches. They will learn to solve problems, find metaphors and examine improvisation as an excellent tool with which to monitor the process of learning. Additionally, students will acquaint themselves with the history of this freest of forms. From the engagement in the games and their analysis will come the most important outcome: the growth of confidence. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 252 | ETHICS FOR TODAY'S SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS MANAGER | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide students with a foundation that will help them deal with ethical issues arising in business today. It will first provide an overview of where ethics fits within philosophy, examine some of the important ethical frameworks, and describe how to apply them. It will then describe "best practices" for how companies and managers can excel in today's business climate, and illustrate them via relevant corporate examples. All of this will provide students with the skills they need to deal with ethical issues as managers. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 254 | RESISTANCE DURING THE HOLOCAUST AND WORLD WAR II | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the history of the Holocaust in the context of the Second World War (1939-1945) with a central focus on examples of resistance to discrimination, fascism and oppression. We will explore varied forms of opposition including armed resistance, spiritual resistance, resistance through writing and identity preservation. We will read autobiographies, view documentary and dramatic films, and use museum resources to develop our understanding of resistance. Required activities include a visit to the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center (Skokie, IL). We will also consider the implications of this history for making ethical choices in our world today. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 255 | SELF EXPLORATION: INSIDE OURSELVES, OUTSIDE WITH OTHERS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Exploring the self can be a very personal and satisfying experience, but can also provide clues as to how you interact with others, accomplish daily tasks and become a more happy, productive and respected individual. This course guides you through a self reflection process in a collaborative learning mode where you will learn about yourself, share the process with a learning partner and observe the trends and conclusions of the class. This course will operate in a unique blended format with three required meetings which will link students in the classroom to other students taking the course online in a synchronized chat format. You will have the option to attend either on campus or online for the scheduled meetings. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 256 | WORKPLACE AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This hybrid-learning course is open to all DePaul undergraduates. It provides a thorough grounding in the theoretical and applied nature of work-based ethical decision-making. We engage the tenets and assumptions of four major ethical perspectives, using them to examine the meanings and implications of morality in professional life. Using the tools of reason, we investigate obstacles to ethical decision-making in one's and others' professional behavior, and apply our learning in the writing of a personal ethical code. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 257 | ENGAGE FOR CHANGE: GET INFORMED, INVOLVED AND CONNECTED | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Name your cause. Whether it is the death penalty, reproductive rights, cancer advocacy, heart disease, homelessness, social security, welfare reform, marriage equality or the environment most people would like to see the world change in some way. The reality is that not everybody has found a way to engage in their community and make their voice heard. Students will engage in personal and collective reflection to explore their own learning styles and the experiential learning process. They will learn how everyday citizens can organize to make sure the issues that matter to them can be addressed at city, state, and national levels. The course will utilize speakers, discussion, learning journals, readings, action assignments and small group exercises to provide an environment where students can explore their own beliefs and perspectives on social change, democracy, citizenship and the process of government in the United States. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 260 | APPROACHES TO CREATIVE WRITING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

For writers, no matter how new or experienced they may be, there's always a need to "self-renew". Every blank page is an invitation to enhance one's writing asset, for with each blank page or new assignment the writing process begins again. What, then, are the tools successful writers use to enhance their writing abilities, sustain their momentum, refresh their creativity and renew their resolve? What writing tools are better suited for creative writing, business writing, journaling, or memoir? What tools do we already have that may only need repurposing or remembering?(2-4 quarter hours)

AI 267 | THE EXAMINED LIFE: A QUESTION OF PHILOSOPHY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The unexamined Life is not worth living," exclaimed the Greek philosopher Socrates, setting the tone for philosophical quests that have shaped out thought and civilizations. "Neither is the examined one," retorted German philosopher Schopenhaurer 2,300 years later after surveying the prospects of the modern world. This course will outline the philosophical tradition of rational thought that stretches in between these thinkers. Students will focus on how the great thinkers and traditions East and West considered ethical, metaphysical, epistemological , political, and aesthetic problems. And they will engage in a philosophical examination of their own life and beliefs. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 271 | THE ART OF PAPERMAKING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Paper is everywhere. We use it to read about the latest news, to wrap birthday presents, and to leave ourselves little sticky reminders. You can find paper almost anywhere and chances are, you have a lot of it lying around your house, lurking in drawers and clogging up your recycling bin. It is one of those commodities that we take for granted. Can paper be art? Can it be the result of creative thinking? Can it be beautiful? Learners in this experience will learn about paper and its history, and will participate in the ancient art of papermaking. While examining the definitions of art and creativity, students will experiment with papermaking techniques, and will create their own works of paper art. The Art of Papermaking focuses on creative processes and art making. This will be, necessarily, an experiential process. Most of the class time will be taken up with experimenting with art materials and with employing the roles of color and design in works of art. Students should prepare by wearing old clothes to class and should expect to get their hands dirty. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 276 | CREATIVE INK: THE ART OF WRITING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will carry students through a series of creative writing experiments aimed at stimulating their imaginations and discovering their literate voices. Students will be exposed to a variety of techniques for story writing, poetry, and avant garde experiments. The course will combine in-class group writing and critical sessions, and individual consultation with the instructor for personal development. Students will also learn how to find outlets for their completed creative work. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 277 | THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will draw from national and regional resources to explore ways of knowing in the liberal arts about the Underground Railroad. The learning experience will include a field trip to a local museum, virtual field trips, films, museum catalogs and other readings, collaborative learning projects, and guest presentations. Students will create poster presentations or other visual products to illustrate their learning about Underground Railroad and write interpretative papers to accompany them (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 278 | THE LITERATURE OF INCARCERATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The U.S. incarcerates well over 2 million people. Proportionally, no other democratic country in the world comes close to this level. Locked away, out of sight and hearing from most of us, this population of women and men is represented by the media in lurid, predatory images. The writing that has emerged from prisoners paints an altogether different picture, however. In this class, we will study several literary texts--short stories, essays, poems--written by women and men who have been or are currently incarcerated. The class will be offered for one competence only and will meet the first five weeks of the quarter. (2 quarter hours)

AI 282 | LEISURE FOR WELL-BEING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The pursuit of happiness for most people is an important aim in life. A personal feeling of well-being includes "emotional happiness" and the rational satisfaction with one's own life. In this course you will attempt to define the term "well-being" and discover its relationship with other concepts such as mental health and life satisfaction. How does physical exercise influence well-being? How do positive and negative life events influence well-being? Do good social relationships guarantee happiness? Do the expectations one has in life with regard to income influence well-being? Is it important to set goals to achieve a high level of well-being? These and other questions will be addressed in this course. You will try to define some of things a person can do to increase his or her level of well-being. Others' ideas serve as common course content, as presented in the material assigned to this course. You will be asked to participate actively and critically, to work individually and in study groups, using your own experience as a field of analysis and reflection. Active group participation will foster a harmonic, interactive environment, which might increase positive relationships among students and foster a feeling of well-being throughout this course. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 284 | THE BRAVE NEW WORLD OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will help students understand and successfully navigate through the brave new world of marketing communications and advertising: a world of segmented audiences, fragmented media channels, technology and interactivity, online communities, and on-demand media, where brand building has emerged as a business imperative. Students will learn which principles of traditional marketing communications are in, which are out, and the new ones that have emerged. We will read books and articles and examine the internet, e-commerce, experiential marketing, consumer-generated content, branded entertainment, search, music and mobile channels. Through the process of creating marketing communications programs utilizing these channels, students will also gain skills in collaborative learning and creativity. Competencies Offered: A5, H2G, S3F, FX (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 285 | WORK, PLAY AND REST: INTEGRATING THE FRAGMENTS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Life has become fragmented. In our modern lives, we strive to maintain work, play and rest in separate realms, within which we work hard, play hard, and even rest hard, all in the hope of finding balance. But when work invades play, and rest is sacrificed for either one, it might be time to shift the paradigm of separateness we have sought to maintain. This course will explore ways we can integrate the fragments of our lives in order to find more fulfillment, balance, satisfaction, and consequently relief both within these three arenas and in the "gray areas" in between. Learning will occur in two modalities, each of which will enhance the other: experientially-based guided movement, storytelling and vocal activities from the improvisational practice of InterPlay, and the study of literature (articles, books, websites and videos) concerning mind-body awareness. Through the in-class practices of InterPlay, students will explore how stressors are held in the body, and define for themselves which aspects of creative expression help to release what no longer serves. Basic movement, storytelling and vocal activities will be introduced in an incremental way, with no prior experience necessary. The focus will be on both individual expression and collaborative possibilities, and personal as well as community and organizational applications will be explored. In our study of the science behind mind-body awareness through class discussions and written assignments, students will explore the application of concepts in conjunction with the experiential model offered by the InterPlay? practice. Part practical activities, part reflection, and part synthesis of defined concepts and models, students will be asked to come to this class as willing participants and identify what methods and systems are applicable to their own lives, and what, from their unique vantage point, could constitute elements toward a new model of health and wholeness. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 286 | NEW ORLEANS IN SONG, STORY & STRUGGLE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The tapestry of New Orleans culture is tremendously rich and varied. This course will concentrate on two strands in that tapestry music from New Orleans and fiction about it. Students will learn about music forms which originated in the city or its environs and which have gone on to dazzle the world, including jazz, r&b, zydeco and funk. We will situate these art forms in social and historical context and examine the complex creative processes which have shaped them. We will become familiar with innovators and icons such as Louis Armstrong, Professor Longhair, Clifton Chenier, the Neville Bothers and Dr. John. We will also read works by literary artists who have a background in and/or fascination with New Orleans, including The Awakening by Kate Chopin; A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams; and Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed. Moreover, we will consider the role played in American history and imagination by New Orleans as well as the role played by images and fantasies of New Orleans in struggles for social justice at the local and national level. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 296 | STAGE PLAY(ING) | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The play's the thing... A play is action, play, conflict, resolution, motion, emotion, live now. A play is crafted for the stage, not for the page. What we find on the page is a script, a guide to the play, not the play itself. The course will explore the play (and playing) in as many of its dimensions as we can discover. Students will read about reading scripts, and then read them to see the play as it could come to be. We will put together scenes, sketches, stories, and/or short plays; as well as improvise, role play, and act in our own work as well as in the work of established playwrights. Students will take the study to the theater to see what works and what doesn't work on the stage. The class will work and play together and apart and let the creative imagination take us where it will.

AI 298 | THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

From the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries, the Italian peninsula was the center of a new age of human discovery and expression. With the unfolding of ancient philosophies, the Catholic Church's temporal and spiritual control over Western Europe faltered. This age changed the meaning of political power, art, literature, science, and religious life. New perspectives lifted the horizons of thought and artistic expression. What meaning and value do these issues have for the contemporary person? By exploring the richness of Renaissance culture, this course attempts to answer the following questions: What happened on the Italian peninsula during the Renaissance? Who were the principal players? How did this period influence western civilization, particularly with respect to learning? What does the Renaissance mean today? Why, indeed, does it play such a major role in contemporary consciousness of the arts, literature, politics, and science? While the general focus of the material is the Renaissance in the Italian city states, the course concentrates on the rise and fall of the Medici family in Florence. Cosimo, Lorenzo, Piero and Giovanni de' Medici (Pope Leo X) were instrumental in the development of this spectacular age in Western Civilization. Learners will also confront our own time with respect to issues raised in the Italian Renaissance. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 299 | ETHICAL ISSUES IN BIOMEDICINE AND HEALTH | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Should parents be allowed to genetically "engineer" designer babies? Given the rapid pace of developments in genetic engineering, this capacity is eminent. Emerging technological capacities in a variety of arenas are creating a host of social questions and potential ethical implications: What are the ethical issues associated with accelerating accumulation of health data? Do pharmaceutical companies have a moral obligation to expand global access to life-saving AIDS drugs? Given our ever-unfolding understanding of the human brain, what regulatory concerns ought to accompany the rollout of new, powerful brain-based biotechnologies? Which methods and approaches are needed to make sense of the impact of science and technology on people's lives worldwide? This course is both an introduction to bioethics, -- an area concerned with moral questions related to health, medicine and society, as well as a reflection upon the ethical and social implications of rapidly emerging technological and scientific capacities. In this course, learners will learn and use ethical theories to consider and analyze general bioethical issues with special attention paid to the unique challenges that emerge as a result of rapid advancements in scientific and technological knowledge. While this course is housed in the School for New Learning (SNL), it is also cross-listed with DePaul University's department of public health. For graduate students taking this course for credit, there is an additional assessment required, specified in the syllabus section below. This course will also require students to deploy and hone critical thinking skills, writing-related capacities as well as reasoning skills. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 313 | RACE AND IDENTITY IN AMERICAN THEATER | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore issues of race and racial identity in American society through the medium of theater. Students will examine a diverse range of theatrical pieces and consider the social and political context for each work as well as the impact each has had on American culture. The class will also view a play on these themes at a Chicago theater. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 315 | CREATIVITY AND IMAGINATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Is there a specific mental procedure that gives rise to the making of new inventions, new scientific and mathematical discoveries, new philosophical systems, and new works of art? If so, it remains as mysterious today as a thousand years ago. In this course we will compare and critically evaluate a range of theories about human invention and creativity, both classic and modern - from ancient conceptions of divine inspiration and "creative madness" to recent hypotheses in the fields of evolutionary psychology, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence. We will test these theories by (a) applying them to our own past experience with creative endeavors and (b) by determining to what extent the theories can adequately explain the emergence of particular inventions, scientific or mathematical breakthroughs, or works of art. The course will introduce the thought of a range of important theorists on the creative process - from Plato to Freud - and also weigh the contributions and examples of prominent artists, scientists, and inventors, including Archimedes, Newton, Mozart, Milton, Poe, Van Gogh, Poincari, Edison, Einstein, and others. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 318 | ZOMBIES: MODERN MYTHS, RACE, AND CAPITALISM | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The figure of the zombie entered US popular culture from Haitian spiritual practice bringing with it concerns of power and race. As the zombie mythology developed in the United States, it has been adapted to address issues as varied as gender and capitalism. Zombie mythology has become so prominent that the philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari asserted that the zombie was the only unique myth of the twentieth century. This class will examine the development of the zombie myth as a reflection of US societal concerns while using the lenses of Post-Colonial and Post-Marxist theory. Specifically, we will use these lenses to explore Halperin's film White Zombie, Romero's films Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead, Kirkman's comic books The Walking Dead, and Boyle?s 28 Days Later. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 322 | PROBLEMS AND ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to moral philosophy with emphasis on the conflict between "moral relativism" (or "subjective" ethics) on the one hand and "moral realism" (or "objective" ethics) on the other. During the course you will be introduced to classic theories and leading figures in the history of ethics, from Plato and Aristotle to Kant and Nietzsche. Course content will focus on issues (e.g., poverty, drug use, capital punishment, sexual behavior, euthanasia, biomedical research, animal rights, political violence) at the center of contemporary ethical debate in the United States and throughout the world. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 323 | ART AND PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Adults often go through periods of profound transition. Many of us search for answers, models, or mentors to help us make sense of the changes. This course deals with ways in which art can be a means of personal transformation, a vehicle for helping us understand the deeper dimensions of our life journeys. Through exposure to artistic representations of significant turning points in human experience, and by studying perspectives on change drawn from various disciplines, we will explore ways in which art both mirrors and facilitates the process of transformation. Students will approach selected works of art (literature, music and visual art) to explore ways artists have represented themes of transformation. In addition to developing competence in art analysis, we will investigate whether our own personal values are reflected in the works studied, and what role art plays in our lives. Students will keep learning journals recording their impressions and reflections about class readings, discussion and multi-media presentations. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 338 | RACE, RACE RELATIONS, RACISM: BREAKING BARRIERS AND BUILDING BRIDGES | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How do we as an ethnically and racially diverse country go about the business of understanding and healing the wounds of racism and building bridges that will allow the gift of diversity to flourish in the United States? Further, what are the connections among U.S. racism and other forms of racism such as ethnic cleansing and "pacification programs" aimed at indigenous people around the world? In this course, we will explore the historical, economic and political roots of racism globally and nationally. In addition, we will look at the changes brought about by the civil rights movement, and ongoing work in the nation and in Chicago aimed at bridging the gaps caused by racism. Through discussion, readings, films, debate, guest panels, and field excursions, students will study a variety of topics. Because the course will focus not only on analysis, but on building bridges, the instructors hope to enroll an ethnically and racially diverse class membership. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 342 | LEARNING ART HISTORY THROUGH THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Art Institute of Chicago is one of the nation's premiere art museums, with a collection that offers wide opportunities for the study of art. This course will examine great paintings in the museum from the Middle Ages up to contemporary works. Students will deepen their knowledge of art history and how to study a painting, develop an overall knowledge of major periods and trends, as well as gain insights into the lives of the artists. Students will also gain a knowledge of the museum itself as a starting off point for further studies. Class will meet at the Art Institute, Michigan and Adams, at the front information desk. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 356 | STUDIES IN GHANA: HISTORY, CULTURE AND SPIRITUALITY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Ghana's history is part of our own. It is the history of mighty empires and timeless knowledge. This course is a return to the motherland to fetch knowledge of African history, culture, spirituality, and healing. We will embark on an educational adventure of discovery. During our three-week stay, we will travel to Kumasi in the land of the Ashanti, visit the Kente weaving villages, hear lectures at the home of W.E.B. DuBois and various Ghanian universities. The slave castles of the African holocaust are also on the itinerary. Coursework includes an introduction to Ghanian history, culture and cosmology, and its religious and healing traditions; a comparative exploration of African and US spirituality; service learning projects, fieldwork, and an emphasis on cultural exchange; training in field research methods leading to a major paper. Estimated expenses includes airfare, ground transport, accommodations, and most meals. (2-6 quarter hours)

AI 362 | LITERATURE AND FILM: PERSONAL AND CULTURAL TRANSFORMATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Literature and film provide rich and varied examples of individual and societal change. Creative and reflective writing are keys to deeper understanding. This course focuses on the processes of thoughtful reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about selected examples of literature and film. We will use selected media and writing exercises as subjects for critical analysis and as springboards into exploration of class members' own lives and cultures. Drawing from diverse sources, we will look at ways in which the arts reflect issues of identity during times of personal and cultural transformation. Through small and large group discussion, reflective learning journals, papers, and presentations, students will respond both analytically and personally to the visual and written media presented as well as to their own writing samples. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 366 | EXPRESSING YOURSELF THROUGH PAINT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on painting as a form of visual expressions and provide opportunities to explore the media of painting and the aesthetics behind why people paint. Students will study the history of painting through selected works, learn how to analyze and critique a painting and use watercolors and acrylic paints to explore the media. A field trip to the Art Institute of Chicago is required. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 384 | CLASSICS FROM THE AFRICAN DIASPORA | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The push for cultural literacy and familiarity with the "Great Books" and classical arts often neglects the important contributions that people of African descent have made to the development of the world. The works of activists, scholars, authors, and artists such as Ida B. Wells Barnett, David Walker, W.E.B. DuBois, Frantz Fanon, and Nina Simone address issues of importance to people regardless of their cultural background: justice, oppression, human rights, education, identity and the human condition. This course will examine 1-2 bodies of work by authors and/or artists of African descent. to explore what each tells us about the human condition and power relationships during a particular historical context. We will also examine the present day implication of these issues. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 396 | INTRODUCTION TO ART THERAPY | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This experiential class in will introduce students to concepts of art therapy and other expressive arts. It will address the therapeutic use of art making by people who experience illness, trauma, or challenges in living, as well as by people who seek personal development and general well being. By participating in expressive arts activities and reflecting on the products and processes, students will learn how art therapy can help people increase awareness of self and others, cope with symptoms, stress, and traumatic experiences; enhance cognitive abilities; and enjoy the life-affirming pleasures of making art. (2-4 quarter hours)

AI 397 | EXPLORING THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will look at the American landscape, a popular subject matter among painters in all media and study works by such noted artists as Albert Bierstadt, Frederick Church, Joseph Stella, Andrew Wyeth, Grant Wood, Georgia O'Keefe and William Beckman. The art history component of the course will be coupled with an opportunity for students to create three landscape paintings using the media of acrylic paints. An introduction to the basic techniques of acrylic painting and color mixing will be included as part of the class. Students will explore the interpretation of both the rural and urban landscape and produce a portfolio of no less than three paintings during the class. A field trip to the Art Institute of Chicago is required. No previous painting experience is required. (2-4 quarter hours)