Cannabis Studies (CAN)

Menu

CAN 230 | CANNABIS AND SOCIETY I | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course engages students in foundational studies of cannabis in context, drawing upon perspectives from science, medicine, history, sociology, law, ethics, and business. Students will receive a broad introduction to the plant's key facts, uses, status, and controversies in contemporary society, with attention to variations among local, state, federal, and international contexts. We will draw comparisons between cannabis, other drugs, and alcohol. The course focuses on developing students' competencies in critical and ethical analysis, dialog, and civic engagement. Students who wish to deepen their study of selected topic through a social justice research methodology should follow this course with CAN 231 Cannabis and Society II.

CAN 231 | CANNABIS AND SOCIETY II | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the companion course to CCS 230 Cannabis and Society I, completing the two short-course sequence. The emphasis in this part II of the sequence is on social-justice approaches to researching topics in cannabis studies, and course content will include scholarly, secondary research literature that pertain to students' academic goals. Key questions that will be considered include: What is social justice research theory, and how can it be applied in cannabis studies? What are critical issues in the disciplines that require further research on cannabis in context, and what are key emerging lines of study? How can we determine various impacts--criminological, economic, educational, environmental, health, legal, and social--of the cannabis industry?.

CAN 230 is a prerequisite for this class.

CAN 260 | INTRODUCTION TO CANNABIS STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course engages students in foundational studies of cannabis in context, drawing upon perspectives from science, medicine, history, sociology, law, ethics, and business. Students will receive a broad introduction to the plant's key facts, uses, status, and controversies in contemporary society, with attention to variations among local, state, federal, and international contexts. We will draw comparisons between cannabis, other drugs, and alcohol. The course focuses on developing students' competencies in critical and ethical analysis, dialog, and civic engagement. Through a major project, students will be guided through a social-justice informed approach to researching a topic that addresses the question of cannabis in relation to their academic or career interests.

CAN 300 | CANNABIS, RACE, AND JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course investigates issues related to race and equity in the recreational cannabis sector. It examines the impact of, among other issues, the industry's commercial landscape and concerns about 'Big Cannabis' as an emerging yet not universal corporatized model, cultural proclivities toward natural and preventive medicine as well as race-related disparities in the cannabis universe. The latter includes a focus on the various regional strategies to resolve disproportionate, race-based arrest and incarceration rates pre-legalization, social equity and licensing programs for cannabis entrepreneurs, teenage marijuana use and the overall state of numerous social justice movements to address these and other racial issues connected to this industry.