Applied Diplomacy (DPL)

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DPL 200 | DIPLOMACY: ITS PAST AND PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to the origins of diplomacy and the manner in which it has evolved as a practice and as a field of study through the end of the 20th century, through examining the evolution of Club Diplomacy to Network Diplomacy, modern understandings of statecraft, negotiation, and liberal internationalism.

DPL 201 | DIPLOMACY: ITS PRESENT AND FUTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will engage the ways diplomacy has evolved into a transprofessional vocation, through the work of non-state actors and grassroots practitioners. Students will also examine the ways in which diplomacy has been practiced in the developing world by both dominant and non-dominant actors.

DPL 202 | TRANSPROFESSIONAL MEDIATION AND NEGOTIATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of diplomatic mediation and negotiation in multiple vocational contexts, including the work of foreign service officers, non-state actors and grassroots diplomats.

DPL 203 | CITIZEN DIPLOMACY IN THE 21ST CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the work of diplomacy as it is practiced by grassroots diplomats, including businesspeople, scientists, artists, community organizers, activists, religious leaders, and municipal political leaders.

DPL 321 | REFUGEE AND FORCED MIGRATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the integral role that different processes of mobility play in shaping today's world: emigration, immigration, displacement, refugee and internally displaced persons flows. Students study the causes and effects of population movements including push-pull factors, demographic, economic, and political variables. Students also look at the role of state and non-state actors and organizations.

DPL 322 | CULTURE AND INEQUALITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course interrogates the concept of culture by showing the dynamic ways in which inequalities define and shape it. Students examine theories of culture and different approaches to studying culture to understand the relationship between the construction of cultural difference and social inequalities.

DPL 323 | NATURE, SOCIETY AND POWER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of environmental issues pertinent to international studies. The reproduction of human societies occurs in a symbiotic relationship with the natural world, yet in the modern era nature has come to be increasingly conceptualized as a resource. This course explores the repercussions of this instrumental separation of nature from culture and society. Our conceptions of nature range from the physical environment to the human body; and the course explores a range of related political, economic, ecological, and socio-cultural issues from theoretical, comparative, and practical perspectives. Issues explored include those of environmental justice and social and political equity, and questions such as who defines what constitutes environmental issues, who is included or excluded from environmental concerns, and who benefits or is harmed by environmental changes occurring as a result of social interventions.

DPL 350 | APPLIED DIPLOMACY SENIOR CAPSTONE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course combines formal class work and independent research. Students will engage a theme in diplomatic studies which reflects their own vocational trajectory.

DPL 400 | DIPLOMACY: ITS FOUNDATIONS AND FUTURES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the history of diplomacy, the modern state of diplomacy engaging both normative and critical interpretations, and the possible futures of diplomacy through a transprofessional lens, including urban diplomacy, diplomacy and public health, diplomacy and human migration, diplomacy and critical ethnic studies, the critical analysis of diplomacy, and diplomacy and public service.

DPL 401 | TRANSPROFESSIONAL MEDIATION AND NEGOTIATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of diplomatic mediation and negotiation in multiple vocational contexts, including the work of foreign service officers, non-state actors and grassroots diplomats.

DPL 402 | CITIZEN DIPLOMACY IN THE 21ST CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will examine the work of diplomacy as it is practiced by grassroots diplomats, including businesspeople, scientists, artists, community organizers, activists, religious leaders, and municipal political leaders.

DPL 421 | MIGRATION AND FORCED MIGRATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the integral role that different processes of mobility play in shaping today's world: emigration, immigration, displacement, refugee and internally displaced persons flows. Students study the causes and effects of population movements including push-pull factors, demographic, economic, and political variables. Students also look at the role of state and non-state actors and organizations.

DPL 422 | CULTURE AND INEQUALITY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course interrogates the concept of culture by showing the dynamic ways in which inequalities define and shape it. Students examine theories of culture and different approaches to studying culture to understand the relationship between the construction of cultural difference and social inequalities.

DPL 423 | NATURE, SOCIETY AND POWER | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of environmental issues pertinent to international studies. The reproduction of human societies occurs in a symbiotic relationship with the natural world, yet in the modern era nature has come to be increasingly conceptualized as a resource. This course explores the repercussions of this instrumental separation of nature from culture and society. Our conceptions of nature range from the physical environment to the human body; and the course explores a range of related political, economic, ecological, and socio-cultural issues from theoretical, comparative, and practical perspectives. Issues explored include those of environmental justice and social and political equity, and questions such as who defines what constitutes environmental issues, who is included or excluded from environmental concerns, and who benefits or is harmed by environmental changes occurring as a result of social interventions.