American Sign Language (ASL)

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ASL 101 | AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a basic introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), the language used by Deaf people in the United States and most of Canada. This course will help students develop their expressive and receptive ASL skills. Students will also learn about Deaf culture since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 101S | AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I FOR SUMMER | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(Covers the equivalent of ASL 101 and the first half of ASL 102.) The first half of beginning American Sign Language (ASL), the language used by Deaf people in the United States and most of Canada. This course will help students develop their expressive and receptive ASL skills. Students will also learn about Deaf culture since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 102 | AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the second Basic American Sign Language course in a series of ASL courses. Students will develop expressive and receptive ASL skills through discussions of topics such as living situations, family and occupations, and daily routines or activities. In addition, students will develop storytelling skills. Throughout the session, readings about Deaf culture will also be incorporated since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 103 | AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the third Basic American Sign Language course in a series of ASL courses. Students will develop expressive and receptive ASL skills through discussions of such topics as giving directions, describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, and talking about routines. Students will also learn about Deaf culture, since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 103S | AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III FOR SUMMER | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(Covers the equivalent of the second half of ASL 102 and all of ASL 103.) The second half of beginning American Sign Language. Students will develop expressive and receptive ASL skills through discussions of such topics as giving directions, describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, and talking about routines. Students will also learn about Deaf culture, since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 104 | INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, expanding from beginners' skills acquired in Basic American Sign Language (ASL) courses. The course involves intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. ASL 103 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 105 | INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a continuation of American Sign Language (ASL), Level Two. It includes vocabulary-building and mastery of grammar through rigorous receptive and expressive language activities. Topics discussed in ASL include exchanges of personal information or life events, description of abstract objects, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. ASL 104 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 106 | INTERMEDIATE SIGN LANGUAGE III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. Continuation of ASL 105. ASL 105 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 199 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 0.5-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

ASL 201 | ADVANCED COMMUNICATION I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Advanced level intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 202 | ADVANCED COMMUNICATION II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Advanced level intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. Continuation of ASL 201. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 203 | ADVANCED COMMUNICATION III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Advanced level intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. Continuation of ASL 202. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 299 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 0.5-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

ASL 305 | AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on selected ASL videotapes and films ranging from the early 1900's to the present. It shares similar elements and functions with any literature in any language. Students will study the historical background of deaf actors and actresses in silent films, analyze the content of stories, discuss grammatical features in ASL or ASL expressions signed by deaf people, and discuss the various signing registers and styles revealed in these contents. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 306 | ARTS IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of arts in the deaf community including the history and movement of De'VIA. Students will develop awareness and recognition of Deaf professional artists and the respective meaning behind their work. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 310 | DEAF CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to concepts and issues in Deaf culture and the Deaf community. This course emphasizes the Deaf community as a linguistic and American cultural minority, the importance of language and education of the deaf people, as well as values, traditions, political activism and diversity in this group. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 311 | DEAF-BLIND COMMUNITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to various aspects of the deaf-blind community including cultural norms and modes of communication used with deaf-blind communities. Students will develop an understanding of the role of Support Service Provider (SSP) or sighted guide. Opportunities for hands-on experience and interaction with the deaf-blind community will be provided. This course will be open to students who may or may not have had prior experiences with the deaf-blind community. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 321 | ART OF TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on development of written English translations from ASL and verbal translation from ASL into English. This course will train students to focus on the meaning expressed in ASL concepts and provide proper translations. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 352 | ASL LINGUISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will help students understand the basic concepts of linguistics as they think critically about ASL structure, including the fundamental areas of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language in use. Also, it will help students compare and contrast ASL and English structures. Additionally, it will provide students with the ability to understand how people can communicate through different kinds of systems, including languages which have several features. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 353 | FINGERSPELLING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will teach the theory behind fingerspelling and will train students on how to process serial information. Students will be able to identify invisible allophones and improve their receptive fingerspelling skills. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 354 | SOCIOLINGUISTICS FOR THE DEAF COMMUNITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on issues affecting the Deaf community and studies the use of ASL in society, along with policies created for and attitudes towards the Deaf community. Students will broaden their understanding of the Deaf community by engaging in discourse analysis as well as interacting with the different populations in the Deaf community. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 395 | FOREIGN LANGUAGES ACROSS CURRICULUM | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The two credit FLAC course allows students to enrich their experience in the co-required course through added reading, writing, and signing activities in ASL. Students must have the equivalent of 106 or higher ability in ASL to take this two credit component. Please contact the Department of Modern Languages if you have questions about this course or about language placement.

ASL 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 0.5-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

ASL 499 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 0.5-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable credit.