German (GER)

Menu

GER 101 | BASIC GERMAN I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

GER 101 is the first quarter of the first-year college German sequence. It introduces the students to the study of language and culture of German speaking countries. The course focuses on the development of all four critical language skills--listening, reading, writing and speaking--while also introducing aspects of German-speaking societies that differ from American society. In-class work will be devoted primarily to communication activities, so that students will be able to utilize the structures and vocabulary you learn to express themself meaningfully and to function in a German-speaking setting. To maximize each student's engagement with the language, students will be talking and listening to each other as much as to the instructor. At the end of the three-course sequence, students will be in command of the basic elements of German language and culture, and should be able to function with relative ease in German-speaking countries. Students will be able to comprehend and engage in basic conversations, write clearly and effectively in German, and read simple but genuine texts.

GER 101S | BASIC GERMAN I FOR SUMMER | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(Covers the equivalent of the GER 101 and the first half of GER 102.) The first half of beginning German. The basic elements of the German language, spoken as well as written, with due regard to the cultural context of German expression.

GER 102 | BASIC GERMAN II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

GER 102 is the second quarter of the first-year college German sequence. It continues to introduce the students to the study of language and culture of German speaking countries. The course focuses on the development of all four critical language skills--listening, reading, writing and speaking--while also introducing aspects of German-speaking societies that differ from American society. In-class work will be devoted primarily to communication activities, so that students will be able to utilize the structures and vocabulary to express themselves meaningfully and to function in a German-speaking setting. To maximize each student's engagement with the language, students will be talking and listening to each other as much as to the instructor. At the end of the three-course sequence, students will be in command of the basic elements of German language and culture, and should be able to function with relative ease in German-speaking countries. Students will be able to comprehend and engage in basic conversations, write clearly and effectively in German, and read simple but genuine texts.

GER 103 | BASIC GERMAN III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

GER 103 is the third quarter of the first-year college German sequence. It continues to introduce the students to the study of language and culture of German speaking countries. The course focuses on the development of all four critical language skills--listening, reading, writing and speaking--while also introducing aspects of German-speaking societies that differ from American society. In-class work will be devoted primarily to communication activities, so that students will be able to utilize the structures and vocabulary to express themselves meaningfully and to function in a German-speaking setting. To maximize each student's engagement with the language, students will be talking and listening to each other as much as to the instructor. At the end of the three-course sequence, students will be in command of the basic elements of German language and culture, and should be able to function with relative ease in German-speaking countries. Students will be able to comprehend and engage in basic conversations, write clearly and effectively in German, and read simple but genuine texts.

GER 103S | BASIC GERMAN II FOR SUMMER | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(Covers the equivalent of the second half of GER 102 and all of GER 103.) The second half of beginning German. Further work on the basic elements of the German language, spoken as well as written, with due regard to the cultural context of German expression.

GER 104 | INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the first quarter of second-year college German, and emphasizes language as communication in real-life situations and as a means to immerse ourselves in the cultures of German-speaking countries. Though students will review and perfect their knowledge of German grammar throughout the year, they will focus on the perfection of the four language skills reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students will have ample opportunities to express themselves in German, acquire basic discussion strategies, and gain insight into many aspects of the contemporary cultures and societies of German-speaking countries. GER 103 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 105 | INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the second quarter of second-year college German, and emphasizes language as communication in real-life situations and as a means to immerse ourselves in the cultures of German-speaking countries. Though students will review and perfect their knowledge of German grammar throughout the year, they will focus on the perfection of the four language skills reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students will have ample opportunities to express themselves in German, acquire basic discussion strategies, and gain insight into many aspects of the contemporary cultures and societies of German-speaking countries. GER 104 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 106 | INTERMEDIATE GERMAN III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This video-based course is designed to develop and expand skills in German and explore ideas, cultural topics and themes from the German-speaking world. Course activities will include: learning from authentic video clips and films; visiting (in textbook and video) various cities and regions in the German-speaking world, exploring the variety and the similarities; practicing skills in German by discussing cultural issues and authentic readings; interpreting graphics and charts on topics of German culture; structured listening and writing practice; reading literary and nonliterary texts of increasing difficulty; summarizing verbally and in writing what is read, heard, and learned; writing compositions and short texts of various types; researching a topic; preparing and presenting results to the class (oral and written). GER 105 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 130 | MOLILSAP STUDY ABROAD | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is specially designed to complement the Modern Language Introductory Languages Study Abroad programs, linked to the third quarter of the first year language program. The course will be taught abroad.

GER 197 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERMAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

GER 198 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

GER 199 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 0.5-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

GER 201 | ADVANCED COMMUNICATION I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The third year of German focuses on four primary linguistic skills: comprehension, reading, writing and speaking. Development in each of these areas is achieved through the introduction, consideration, and analysis of longer German stories, increasingly complex discussions of said texts, and the review, and hopefully ultimate mastery, of various vocabularies and advanced-level grammar. Ample time will be devoted to speaking and developing oral proficiency in class as well. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 202 | ADVANCED COMMUNICATION II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The third year of German continues strengthening four primary linguistic skills: comprehension, reading, writing and speaking. The main goal is to achieve oral proficiency. Ample time will be devoted to speaking and developing oral proficiency in class as well. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 203 | ADVANCED COMMUNICATION III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The third year of German continues strengthening four primary linguistic skills: comprehension, reading, writing and speaking. The main goal is oral proficiency. Ample time will be devoted to speaking and developing oral proficiency in class as well. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 277 | COFFEEHOUSES AND CULTURE IN TURN OF THE CENTURY VIENNA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Vienna around 1900 was the setting for major innovations in the arts, literature, sciences, and philosophy, and the developments that emerged from this time and place shaped 20th century thought and culture. Central to the rich intellectual life in turn of the century Vienna was the Viennese coffeehouse, a place that encouraged the exchange of ideas and served as a spatial extension of the private sphere. Using the coffeehouse as a kind of experiential environment, this course will look at the ideas that emerged from the cafe interiors of Vienna 1900: Freud's theories of the unconscious, dreams, and (female) hysteria; the artworks of Gustav Klimt and the Viennese Secessionists; the "Young Vienna" literary circle; the new musical language of Arnold Schonberg; and the radicalism of modernist architecture. Further, we'll discuss spatial and sociological theories of coffeehouse culture and consider the function that coffeehouses serve today in Vienna and in Chicago, too. This course also includes an optional excursion to the Ipsento 606 coffeehouse in Chicago's Bucktown neighborhood for a "Coffee 101" presentation on coffee history and a coffee tasting ("cupping"), which has been designed specifically for DePaul students taking this class.

GER 278 | THE MAKING OF THE GRIMMS' FAIRYTALES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Fairy tales spark our imaginations and inspire great artists in a variety of mediums from around the world, whether in commercial format like Disney or in illustrations that speak to sides of human nature that can make us uncomfortable. Of these tales, Grimms' Children's and Household Tales (known to us today as ?Grimms' Fairy Tales?) are some of the most powerful for how they use predictable narrative outcomes to give space to conflicts of power, gender, generational difference, and class. This course takes on all these issues while reading in English translation all 156 tales in the original edition of the fairytale collection. People who think they know these stories are in for a wild ride (for starters, they were originally never intended for children) as we peel back the layers of meaning in the tales and consider how and why the Grimm Brothers turned the stories they collected into now-familiar fairy tales: a process which may have originated in dedication to German nature and nation, but has been seen by some as a harbinger of Nazi fascism.

GER 297 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERMAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

GER 298 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

GER 299 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 0.5-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

GER 301 | INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE I : FROM ORIGINS TO 1600 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The modern understanding of the German nation has its origins in a number of tribes that emerged from southern Scandinavia and northern Germany before the Common Era. This course will trace the development of "Germany" ( a term that was not commonly used until the 1500s) in the Medieval period and into the 16th century, when Martin Luther and his 95 Theses initiated the movement that would later be known as the Protestant Reformation. In the exploration of this history, and of the evolution of the German language, students will read representative works of literature which will question the category of literature altogether. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 302 | INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE II: FROM 1600-1850 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Literature from 1600-1850. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 303 | INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE III: FROM 1850 TO PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Literature from 1850 to the present. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 304 | GERMAN DRAMA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to familiarize students with some of the outstanding dramas written in German speaking countries during the last half century. Students will explore dramas that ignited hot public debates on account of their weighty topics, science and ethics, or science as power, more precisely, political power: "What do scientific discoverers do when they feel responsibility towards the world?" Towards the end of the 20th century, and with the rise of critical feminist thought, the fierce satirical drama of the Nobel Prize winning Austrian playwright Elfriede Jelinek on science, and the power games of gender garners attention. Her work and those of other artists will be explored. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 305 | GERMAN PROSE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics include: prose from 1600 to Goethe; from the Romantic to the Realistic periods; prose of the 20th century. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 306 | THE NOVELLE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

From Goethe to Grass. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 307 | GERMAN POETRY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Instead of treating poems as potentially boring puzzles that can only be solved with some piece of arcane knowledge not available to average people, this course approaches the history of poems written in German by focusing on the various tools available to poets. What if sound (the sound of individual words but also the cumulative sound, including tone, which words make when put in a certain order) were more important than meaning or expression? What if lines, rather than sentences, made for a more reliable unit of composition? What if metaphor and simile actually created relationships between different things rather that those relationships existing prior to the poem? Students will be expected to experiment with these techniques themselves, and we will use our focus on those techniques as a constant that takes us through the periods comprising literary history in German-speaking countries. The variety of these periods, taken together, should serve to keep the subject matter lively. Even if the materials sacrifice depth for breadth, the course will reserve time for such luminaries as the Minnesingers, Holderlin, Goethe & Schiller, Trakl, Rilke, Brecht, Bachmann, and others, while touching on occasional oddballs like Heinz Herbeck and contemporaries such as Monika Rinck and Nora Gomringer. The aims of this course are to be better able to experience poems rather than decode them, and to situate them in their literary classification.

GER 308 | GOETHE'S FAUST | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores one of the great, canonical works of German literature, Goethe's peculiar and provocative interpretation of the legendary figure of Dr. Faustus. By spending an entire quarter with this one text, students have time to gain a thorough appreciation for its depth, complexity, and poetic excellence. Classroom discussions will focus in part on a close reading of the text in its various dimensions: characterization, motivation, plot-structure and plot-development, poetic form (meter and rhyme), and poetic imagery (metaphors, similes, etc.). Students will also examine the philosophical questions raised by Faust and Mephisto's rich and probing dialogues and also consider the larger cultural and historical significance of Goethe's Faust. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 309 | GERMAN CIVILIZATION I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The rise and fall of the "Holy Roman Empire": Social, intellectual and artistic background of Germany from its origins to 1871. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 310 | GERMAN CIVILIZATION II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Social, intellectual and artistic developments in Germany from unification in 1871 to reunification in 1990. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 311 | GERMAN CIVILIZATION III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

German Civilization III" examines the many facets of contemporary Germany and Austria. Students learn about current events via German-language popular culture, politics, the arts, and business, and engage with several media (internet, television, film, print) to understand the happenings of the German-speaking world in the present day. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 312 | GERMAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to introduce the student to some of the most powerful and influential German thinkers in Western civilization of the 19th and 20th century, whose names are synonymous with revolutionary thinking, and whose philosophies have deeply shaped the Weltanschauung of 20th century man. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 313 | TURN OF THE CENTURY VIENNA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A world center of modern art and thought: Freud, Wittgenstein, Klimt, Kokoschka, Kafka, Shoenberg. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 314 | BERLIN AND THE GOLDEN TWENTIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Berlin in the 1920s was an exhilarating, modern city marked by contrasts: the trauma of returning soldiers and the decadence of the modern metropolis; an ever-growing tension between liberalism and what would become an increasingly radical political right; and the emergence of the progressive Weimar Republic, which was characterized by periodic political turmoil and economic instability. These "Golden Twenties" also gave rise to cultural innovations in the arts, film, theater, literature, music, philosophy, architecture, social sciences, and technology: Berlin was at the center of it all. In this course, we'll explore some of the major filmmakers, writers, artists, and musicians in this great metropolis of the early twentieth century as we consider the political conflicts that plagued Germany's young democracy. We'll also discuss how Weimar-era Berlin has been depicted in film and television, with the miniseries "Babylon Berlin" (2017) functioning as a kind of foundational thread that we'll return to throughout the quarter. Finally, we'll think about what led to the collapse of the Weimar Republic and the resemblances this period may bear to our current political era. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 315 | LITERATURE AFTER 1945 (EAST AND WEST) | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Reconstruction of German literature and coming to terms with the past: "Gruppe 47"', Grass, Boell, Enzensberger. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 316 | LITERATURE OF THE WEIMAR YEARS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Brecht. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 317 | WOMEN WRITERS OF GERMAN EXPRESSION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Studies in literature and social issues from all periods of German, Austrian and Swiss history. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 319 | MULTICULTURAL GERMANY: LITERATURE, FILM AND ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course asks students to consider various literary/artistic media as ways of communicating and interpreting experiences relevant to migrants in Germany. The groups we'll explore include the Turkish and Italian guest workers ("Gastarbeiter") of the the 1950s and '60s that made West German (re-)construction possible; Afro-Germans, a long-understudied population that emerged largely from two main sources: descendants of Africans who migrated to Germany in relation to its African colonies, and to a much larger extent, the offspring born to German mothers and U.S. military fathers in centers of American occupation; and the most recent wave of refugees from Syria, Afghanistan, and Iraq. By engaging with writings, artwork, films, and music created by members of these populations, students will be encouraged to think critically about representations of refugees and immigrants in media and discourse --to consider, for example, how even the labeling of refugees in Europe as a ?crisis? generates a certain kind of response. The course will end with a look toward the future of multiculturalism in Germany and consider the possibility of a pan-European multicultural literature and film.

GER 320 | ADVANCED COMMERCIAL GERMAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will approach the concept of Geschaftsdeutsch on two levels: first with an examination of Germany, Austria, the European Union, and the German industry and economy, and second, with an exploration of the German professional world (i.e. the processes involved in searching, applying, and interviewing for an internship or employment in a German speaking country). Students will practice in class through role playing, skits, writing example letters, resumes, and CVs, etc. A number of guest speakers from the German business community in Chicago are possible. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 321 | TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The primary objective of this course is to immerse the student in the process of translation from German into English (and to a lesser extent from English into German) to successfully complete a variety of translation projects for professional, academic, artistic, or personal purposes, thus equipping the students with proficiency in translating at an advanced level. Through various translation assignments, students will be able to review German grammar, work within different registers and learn appropriate vocabulary, expand their reading and writing in German while developing a sense of responsibility for the text translated. This course will present a survey of translation theory, particularly as it relates to Germany, and probe the usefulness of technology. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 329 | THE GERMAN FILM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The "German National Cinema" has changed nearly as much as the face of the German nation itself over the course of the twentieth century. Films made in the various "Germanies" in the past hundred years are a reflection of, and reaction to, the political, social, and artistic climates confronting German-speaking filmmakers. Students will investigate the motivations surrounding the production of certain historically significant films, as well as the messages that were conveyed to the contemporary audience through the cinema of the period. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 351 | GERMAN PHONOLOGY AND PHONETICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An in-depth study of the language's sound system and intensive pronunciation practice. GER 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

GER 395 | FOREIGN LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The two credit FLAC course allows students to enrich their experience in the co-required course through added reading, writing, listening and speaking activities in German. Students must have the equivalent of 106 or higher ability in German to take this two credit component. Please contact the Department of Modern Languages if you have questions about this course or about language placement.

GER 397 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERMAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

GER 398 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

GER 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 0.5-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

GER 401 | INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE I: FROM ORIGINS TO 1600 | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The modern understanding of the German nation has its origins in a number of tribes that emerged from southern Scandinavia and northern Germany before the Common Era. It was not until the reign of Charlemagne in the eighth and early ninth centuries that the process of uniting most of the Germanic provinces was completed under the Carolingian Empire, which was later to be absorbed into the Holy Roman Empire. The course will trace these developments, as well as that of "Germany" (indeed a term that was not commonly used until the 1500s) in the Medieval period and into the 16th century, when Martin Luther and his 95 Theses initiated the movement that would later be known as the Protestant Reformation. Students will read representative works of literature that explore the traditions, attitudes, and mindsets of Germanic peoples in their respective eras.

GER 402 | INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE II: FROM 1600 - 1850 | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Literature from 1600-1850.

GER 403 | INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE III: FROM 1850 TO PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Literature from 1850 to the present.

GER 404 | GERMAN DRAMA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to familiarize students with some of the outstanding dramas written in German speaking countries during the last half century. Students will explore dramas that ignited hot public debates on account of their weighty topics, science and ethics, or science as power, more precisely, political power: "What do scientific discoverers do when they feel responsibility towards the world?" Towards the end of the 20th century, and with the rise of critical feminist thought, the fierce satirical drama of the Nobel Prize winning Austrian playwright Elfriede Jelinek on science, and the power games of gender garners attention. Her works and those of other artists will be explored.

GER 405 | GERMAN PROSE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Topics include: prose from 1600 to Goethe; from the Romantic to the Realistic periods; prose of the 20th century.

GER 406 | THE NOVELLE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

From Goethe to Grass.

GER 407 | GERMAN POETRY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Topics include: from the Baroque to Holderlin; from Romanticism to the present.

GER 408 | GOETHE'S FAUST | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores one of the great, canonical works of German literature, Goethe's peculiar and provocative interpretation of the legendary figure of Dr. Faustus. By spending an entire quarter with this one text, students have time to gain a thorough appreciation for its depth, complexity, and poetic excellence. Classroom discussions will focus in part on a close reading of the text in its various dimensions: characterization, motivation, plot-structure and plot-development, poetic form (meter and rhyme), and poetic imagery (metaphors, similes, etc.). Students will also examine the philosophical questions raised by Faust and Mephisto's rich and probing dialogues and also consider the larger cultural and historical significance of Goethe's Faust.

GER 409 | GERMAN CIVILZATION I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The rise and fall of the "Holy Roman Empire'": Social, intellectual and artistic background of Germany from its origins to 1871.

GER 410 | GERMAN CIVILZATION II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Social, intellectual and artistic developments in Germany from unification in 1871 to reunification in 1990.

GER 411 | GERMAN CIVILIZATION III | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Contemporary Germany. Cross-listed with GER 311.

GER 412 | GERMAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to introduce the student to some of the most powerful and influential German thinkers in Western civilization of the 19th and 20th century, whose names are synonymous with revolutionary thinking, and whose philosophies have deeply shaped the Weltanschauung of 20th century man.

GER 413 | TURN OF THE CENTURY VIENNA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A world center of modern art and thought: Freud, Wittgenstein, Klimt, Kokoschka, Kafka, Shoenberg.

GER 414 | BERLIN AND THE GOLDEN TWENTIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Berlin in the 1920s was a place characterized by a number of contradictions: the legion suffering of returning soldiers after the First World War contrasted with the speed and frivolity of the modern metropolis; the final moments of the German monarchy and a burgeoning, albeit tenuous, republican government; and an ever-growing tension between liberalism, both political and personal, and an increasingly radical political Right. In many ways, the Berlin of these "Golden Twenties" is inseparable from the Weimar Republic. As the geographical and intellectual center for this new government, Berlin bore firsthand witness to the numerous political crises that marked this short, and ultimately doomed, political experiment between 1918 and 1933. Further, Weimar culture was defined by its staggering creative production in all fields -- art, theater, literature, philosophy, architecture, science, and technology -- and in turn, Berlin functioned as the setting for a multitude of intellectual meetings and intersections. This course will contextualize the Weimar Republic in postwar Europe, discuss the political crises that plagued Germany's young democracy, and explore some of the major cultural players in this great metropolis of the early twentieth century.

GER 415 | LITERATURE AFTER 1945 (EAST AND WEST) | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Reconstruction of German literature and coming to terms with the past: "Gruppe 47"', Grass, Boell, Enzensberger.

GER 416 | LITERATURE OF THE WEIMAR YEARS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Brecht.

GER 417 | WOMEN WRITERS OF GERMAN EXPRESSION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Studies in literature and social issues from all periods of German, Austrian and Swiss history.

GER 419 | MULTICULTURAL CONTEMPORARY WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Focus on the critical bicultural awareness of immigrant writers of German expression whose original language is not German.

GER 420 | ADVANCED COMMERCIAL GERMAN | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will approach the concept of Geschaftsdeutsch on two levels: first with an examination of Germany, Austria, the European Union, and the German industry and economy, and second, with an exploration of the German professional world (i.e. the processes involved in searching, applying, and interviewing for an internship or employment in a German speaking country). Students will practice through role playing, skits, writing example letters, resumes, and CVs, etc. A number of guest speakers from the German business community in Chicago are possible.

GER 421 | TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The primary objective of this course is to immerse the student in the process of translation from German into English (and to a lesser extent from English into German) to successfully complete a variety of translation projects for professional, academic, artistic, or personal purposes, thus equipping the students with proficiency in translating at an advanced level. Through various translation assignments, students will be able to review German grammar, work within different registers and learn appropriate vocabulary, expand their reading and writing in German while developing a sense of responsibility for the text translated. This course will present a survey of translation theory, particularly as it relates to Germany, and probe the usefulness of technology.

GER 429 | THE GERMAN FILM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The "German National Cinema" has changed nearly as much as the face of the German nation itself over the course of the twentieth century. Films made in the various "Germanies" in the past hundred years are a reflection of, and reaction to, the political, social, and artistic climates confronting German-speaking filmmakers. Students will investigate the motivations surrounding the production of certain historically significant films, as well as the messages that were conveyed to the contemporary audience through the cinema of the period.

GER 451 | GERMAN PHONOLOGY AND PHONETICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

An in-depth study of the language's sound system and intensive pronunciation practice. Cross listed with GER 351.

GER 496 | PRACTICUM IN GERMAN INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Supervised practice in language instruction, paired with a mentor instructor in a beginning or intermediate language course. Students observe a class, teach a lesson or lessons, assist in assessment and lesson planning, and complete individualized assignments to develop their skills as classroom language instructors. Repeatable.

GER 497 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERMAN | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

GER 498 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable credit.

GER 499 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable credit.