Special Education and Reading (SER)

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SER 96 | FIELD EXPERIENCE FOR DUAL CERTIFICATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Required of all Dual Certification students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. The observation hours are a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses. A total of 200 hours are required. (0 credit hours)

SER 300 | INTRO TO SPECIAL EDUCATION I: EXCEPTIONALITY & LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores exceptionality, its theories, research, and foundations as well as processes of learning as they are rooted in the domain of special education. Focus will be on typical and atypical growth from pregnancy through age 21 including cognitive, physical, emotional, linguistic, social, and sensory areas and the impact of disability on learning. An introduction to the field of special education and an overview of the categories of disability will also be provided. The course addresses the psychology of the exceptional child including the learning disabled.

SER 301 | INTRO TO SPECIAL EDUCATION II - FOUNDATIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces the theoretical, historical, and legal foundations of special education as well as models for assessment, placement, and instruction. The course also focuses on the psychology, characteristics and learning needs of the various types of behavioral, emotional, physical and cognitive and learning disabilities. The course addresses the identification of the exceptional child including without limitation the learning disabled.

LSI 300 is a prerequisite for this course.

SER 302 | INSTRUCTION AND DIFFERENTIATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces teaching exceptional students with mild, moderate and severe disabilities and includes state learning standards, curriculum, assessment, planning, instruction in the content areas, and accommodations for diverse students with disabilities in a variety of settings. Candidates learn to use research and assessment data to guide planning and differentiate instruction in the content areas. Applied activities will focus on teaching science and social studies to students with disabilities K-12. The course addresses the methods of instruction for the exceptional child including without limitation the learning disabled.

SER 303 | CLASSROOM AND BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course covers theoretical approaches to and associated strategies for classroom and behavior management, the development of supportive learning environments to maximize motivation, attention, and engagement for exceptional learners in a variety of educational settings. Candidates learn to use assessment data to understand behavior and guide selection and application of principles of social-emotional learning and classroom/behavior in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms. Attention will be given to the Illinois Social/Emotional Learning Standards. Candidates are introduced to functional behavioral assessment (FBA) and behavior intervention plans (BIP), as well as how to monitor growth and development in targeted areas. Strategies to increase the individual's self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem and decrease self-injurious behaviors are considered.

SER 310 | TEACHING MATHEMATICS TO EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides the theoretical, content, and pedagogical foundations for teaching mathematics to diverse exceptional learners across all grade levels. Candidates review and deepen their own knowledge of basic math content with emphasis on number, number systems, operations, fractions, decimals, percent and measurement. They learn how to develop exceptional students' abilities to think and reason as well as build computation and problem-solving skills. Attention is given to Illinois Common Core standards and how to support exceptional students when introducing new concepts and correct misconceptions. The course covers informal assessment/progress monitoring, using assessment data to plan instruction and match instruction to exceptional student needs, and organizing instruction for exceptional learners in whole-class, small-group, and individual settings.

SER 311 | TEACHING MATHEMATICS FIELD EXPERIENCE LAB | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this lab course, candidates provide math instruction to diverse, at-risk and exceptional students and use informal assessments and progress monitoring to guide instructional practices and differentiation for exceptional students. Supervision, coaching, and mentoring in implementing effective instructional strategies is provided by program faculty. The lab introduces the concept of documenting impact on student learning. This experience is offered in an on-campus facility that serves diverse at-risk learners and students with disabilities. (2 credit hours)

LSI 310 is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 312 | TEACHING MATHEMATICS TO EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS II: INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course candidates continue to learn/review mathematics content along with pedagogical content skills for exceptional learners across all grade levels with an emphasis on algebra and geometry. The course emphasizes identifying individual exceptional needs, strategies, curriculum, and connecting classroom assessment to instruction for exceptional, diverse, and at-risk math learners. Attention is given to Illinois Common Core standards. Candidates practice connecting math knowledge to other disciplines and incorporating reading and writing into math instruction. The course provides a comprehensive model for effective instruction for exceptional learners that includes informal assessment to determine student needs, flexible grouping, skilled content delivery, progress-monitoring, and technology to support learning.

SER 313 | TEACHING MATHEMATICS LAB II | 1 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this Lab, taken with LSI 312, candidates provide math instruction to diverse, at-risk and exceptional students in the lower grades, and use informal assessments and progress monitoring to guide instructional practices and differentiation for exceptional students. Supervision, coaching, and mentoring in implementing effective instructional strategies is provided by program faculty. The Lab introduces the concept of documenting impact on student learning. This experience is offered in an on-campus facility that serves diverse at-risk learners and students with mild-moderate disabilities. (1 credit hour)

SER 314 | TEACHING LITERACY TO EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course covers the theoretical and historical foundations of literacy instruction for diverse, at-risk, and exceptional learners from PK-21. Topics include the theoretical and historical foundations of literacy instruction, oral language development as it relates to literacy, and foundational constructs of reading (i.e., phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). Strategies and methods for addressing the needs of middle and high school students with literacy deficits will also be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on understanding literacy development PK-12, utilizing the Common Core standards, analyzing and applying research-based instructional practices, and using assessment to guide instruction to meet the need of diverse literacy learners (at-risk and with disabilities). The course also examines informal assessments to determine student progress in reading and, spelling.

SER 315 | TEACHING LITERACY FIELD EXPERIENCE LAB | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this lab, candidates provide reading instruction to exceptional students and use informal assessments and progress monitoring to guide instructional practices and differentiation. Supervision, coaching, and mentoring in implementing effective instructional strategies for struggling readers are provided by program faculty. The course develops the concept of documenting impact on student learning. This experience is offered in an on-campus facility that serves at-risk literacy learners and students with disabilities. (2 credit hours)

SER 314 is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 316 | TEACHING LITERACY TO EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS II: INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on literacy development for diverse, at-risk, and exceptional, learners in third grade and higher, including those with mild-moderate disabilities. Differences in reading abilities will be examined in light of providing appropriate, effective, and meaningful literacy instruction. Philosophical approaches, theoretical models, assessment measures, and practical implications for working with exceptional readers will be analyzed. Attention will be given to the literacy learning process, Common Core standards, the interaction of reading and learning in the content areas, and the connections between reading and writing in the upper grades. The course continues the examination of informal assessment to determine monitor exceptional student progress in reading, spelling, and writing. Uses of technology in literacy learning will also be examined.

SER 317 | TEACHING LITERACY LAB II | 1 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this Lab, taken with LSI 316, candidates provide reading and writing instruction to exceptional students in the upper grades and use informal assessments and progress monitoring to guide instructional practices and differentiation. Supervision, coaching, and mentoring in implementing effective instructional strategies for exceptional students are provided by program faculty. The course develops the concept of documenting impact on student learning. This experience is offered in an on-campus facility that serves at-risk literacy learners and students with mild-moderate disabilities. (1 credit hour)

SER 320 | COLLABORATION IN SCHOOLS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course covers theoretical models as well as ethical and practical strategies for collaborating with professionals and paraprofessionals in schools and communities as well as students with disabilities and their families. Candidates consider models of co-teaching and Response - to - Intervention and learn strategies for effective collaboration with general education teachers and training of paraprofessionals. Candidates also consider the dynamics of families and of schools and how to plan for and initiate family involvement to maximize the learning experience of the student with disabilities. Attention is given to interpersonal communication strategies and how to use communication strategies to foster collaboration. This course requires 10 hours of field experience.

SER 324 and SER 325, or an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SER 321 | FORMAL ASSESSMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course considers the theoretical, legal, ethical, and technical aspects of formal assessment in special education as well as models of nondiscriminatory assessment in the context of the requirements of special education law. Candidates gain knowledge of a variety of formal assessments including their purposes, characteristics, and limitations. They learn how to select, adapt, administer, score, interpret, and communicate the results of class-wide and individual assessments. Attention is given to collaborative assessment and educational planning based on assessment results, particularly the development IEP goals, objectives, and recommendation for instruction.

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 322 | TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES I: ACADEMICS, LIFE SKILLS, & TRANSITION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides the theoretical and practical basis for teaching academic and life skills to students with more significant disabilities as well as the theoretical and practical aspects of educational transitions for students with disabilities. Candidates will learn the principle of partial participation and how to align curriculum with state learning goals as well as strategies for teaching academic skills to the greatest possible extent while keeping goals high but attainable so that learners can succeed. Candidates will also learn how to balance teaching of academics with independent living skills, participation in community activities, personal safety, health, and relationship skills, self-management, and decision-making. Candidates learn outcomes-based special education planning for early transitions, transitions between educational levels, and transition to work or higher education.

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 323 | TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES II: COMMUNICATION & SOCIAL SKILLS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course offers strategies for assessing and teaching oral language and communication skills to students with more significant disabilities, including ways to increase communication and generalize across settings. Candidates learn how to employ technology to aid communication, including selection and use of augmentive and alternative communication (AAC) devices. Equal attention is given to the theoretical and developmental aspects of behavior and social skills as well as curriculum and strategies for teaching social skills. Training and support of paraprofessionals related to communication and social skills are also covered. This course includes 10 hours of field experience.

SER 322 or an Education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 324 | PRACTICUM: INCLUSION SETTING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Two school morning per week for eight weeks of supervised practicum (40 hours total). In this course, candidates are introduced to teaching in a general education inclusion classroom. Candidates will interact with students and will plan and conduct small-group and large-group instruction in collaboration with the cooperating teacher. Taken in conjunction with SER 325 Topics in Special Education. Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate practicum placements. (2 credit hours). COREQUISITE: SER 325.

SER 302 or an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SER 325 | TOPICS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will cover professional and ethical standards in special education and other variable topics such as inclusion, technology, managing a resource room, Common Core Standards, and lesson planning for students with disabilities. In addition, the course functions as a seminar for SER 324 Practicum: Inclusion Setting and provides support as candidates participate in practicum experiences. The course continues to develop skills for documenting impact on student learning, improving practice, and using data to drive instruction. COREQUISITE: SER 324. (2 credit hours)

SER 302 or an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SER 326 | TRANSITIONAL AND VOCATIONAL PLANNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the theoretical and practical aspects of educational transitions for students with disabilities. Processes of human change will be considered as well as the importance of networking and collaboration among families, educators, other service providers to facilitate transitions. The course focuses on outcomes-based special education planning for early transitions, transitions between educational levels, and transition to work or higher education. The course includes prioritizing social, vocational and community living goals, IEP transition requirements, and writing transition plans. Attention will be given to vocational assessment, planning, and curricula.

SER 327 | PRACTICUM: SELF-CONTAINED SETTING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

One school morning per week for eight weeks of supervised practicum (30 hours total). In this course, candidates are introduced to teaching in a self-contained, special education classroom. Candidates will interact with students and plan and conduct 1:1, small-group, and/or large-group instruction in collaboration with the cooperating teacher. Taken in conjunction with SER 328 Contemporary Issues in Special Education. Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate practicum placements. (2 credit hours)

SER 322 or SER 323 is a prerequisites for this class.

SER 328 | CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will review professional and ethical standards in special education and address timely or controversial issues in special education instruction. In addition, this course functions as a seminar for SER 327 Practicum Experience: Self-Contained Setting and provides support as candidates move into practicum experience. The course continues to develop skills for documenting impact on student learning, improving practice, and using data to drive instruction. COREQUISITE: SER 327. (2 credit hours)

SER 322 or SER 323 is a prerequisites for this class.

SER 329 | TEACHING LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course addresses the integration of reading, writing, and oral language into the content areas. Candidates learn to assess the reading needs of students in content area courses and to design, select, modify, and evaluate a wide range of materials for the content areas. The course goes beyond teaching a set of isolated generic reading comprehension skills and provides strategies that can be applied across content areas to prepare diverse, at-risk, and exceptional students to read, write, talk, and think critically about complex texts, and to develop positive literacy identities. Attention is given to incorporating Common Core standards into instruction.

SER 314 or an Education major or minor are prerequisites for this class.

SER 346 | STRATEGIES FOR MAINSTREAMING AND INCLUSION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Focus will be on the practical problems related to the integration of exceptional children and youth into regular classrooms. Identification, characteristics, programs, curricular variations, and techniques for securing maximum development of students with a variety of special needs with emphasis on learning disabilities. The course also covers historical background, as well as current legal and service provision issues, including mainstreaming and inclusion.

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 383 | STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This seminar course provides support for candidates as they begin their student teaching experience. In addition to and in conjunction with student teaching, candidates will complete a project designed to document their ability to impact student learning based on teaching. This course includes 30 hours of field experience prior to student teaching.

SER 324 and SER 325 are prerequisites for this class.

SER 384 | CAPSTONE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Designed primarily as a culminating and integrating experience, this course uses a seminar approach to support candidates during student teaching and to help them clarify and reflect upon the relationship of concepts of their major with those in the liberal studies program. Candidates will make connections between their own theoretical and professional orientations, their liberal studies education, and the Urban Professional Multicultural Model.

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 385 | STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION: ELEMENTARY | 8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Five school days per week in supervised teaching experience for 8 weeks. Candidates will also attend a student teaching seminar (SER 383 or SER 384). Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate student teaching placements. (8 credit hours)

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 386 | STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION: SECONDARY | 12 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Five school days per week in supervised teaching experience for 8 weeks. Candidates will also attend a student teaching capstone seminar (SER 383 or SER 384). Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate student teaching placements. (12 credit hours)

An education major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 387 | FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR THE MIDDLE GRADES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Introduction to disabilities and the historical and legal foundations of special education. This course will prepare candidates to address the emotional, social, psychological, and cognitive needs of students with disabilities, with a particular emphasis on addressing the needs of students with reading and learning disabilities at the middle school level, including developmental and remedial instruction and support. ***This course counts toward Reading Teacher endorsement. Co-requisites for this course are MGE 321 and MGE 331. In this course, students will: 1.

MGE 300, MGE 301 and Junior standing are prerequisites for this class.

SER 402 | INSTRUCTION AND DIFFERENTIATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides an introduction to teaching exceptional students with mild, moderate and severe disabilities and includes state learning standards, curriculum, assessment, planning, instruction in the content areas, accommodations, grouping, and technology for diverse students with disabilities in a variety of settings. Candidates learn to use research and assessment data to guide planning and differentiate instruction in the content areas. Applied activities will focus on teaching science and social studies to student with disabilities K-12.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 403 | CLASSROOM AND BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course covers theoretical approaches to and associated strategies for classroom and behavior management, the development of supportive learning environments to maximize motivation, attention, and engagement for exceptional learners in a variety of educational settings. Candidates learn to use assessment data to understand behavior and guide selection and application of principles of social-emotional learning and classroom/behavior in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms. Candidates are introduced to social/emotional learning standards, functional behavioral assessment (FBA) and behavior intervention plans (BIP), as well as how to monitor growth and development in targeted areas. Strategies to increase the individual's self- awareness, management, control, reliance, and esteem and decrease self-injurious behaviors are considered.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 405 | TEACHING LITERACY TO EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on understanding literacy development in general, and for diverse, at-risk, and exceptional learners with mild-moderate disabilities, specifically. Differences in reading abilities will be examined in light of providing appropriate, effective, and meaningful literacy instruction. Philosophical approaches, theoretical models, assessment measures, and strategies and techniques for working with exceptional learners will be analyzed. Attention will be given to the literacy learning process, including the interaction between language, reading, and writing abilities. An overview of informal assessments that can be used to monitor exceptional student progress in reading, spelling, and writing will be provided and the uses of technology in literacy learning examined.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 409 | TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course offers strategies for assessing and teaching academic, life, communication, and social skills to students with more significant disabilities, including transition and vocational planning. Candidates will learn how to align curriculum with state learning standards and how to balance the teaching of academics with independent living skills, participation in community activities, and personal safety and health. Candidates will learn to manage physical and health concerns as well as learn how to employ technology to aid communication, including selection and use of augmentive and alternative communication (AAC) devices. In addition, candidates will train support staff in each of these areas.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 410 | TEACHING MATHEMATICS TO EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides the theoretical, content, and pedagogical knowledge and skills for teaching mathematics through problem solving across all grade levels to diverse exceptional learners. Candidates review and deepen their own knowledge of basic math content with emphasis on number, number systems, operations, fractions, decimals, percent and measurement, algebra and geometry. They learn how to develop exceptional students' abilities to think and reason as well as build computation and problem-solving skills. Attention is given to Illinois Common Core standards and how to support exceptional students when introducing new concepts and correcting misconceptions. The course provides a comprehensive model for effective instruction for exceptional learners that include using assessment data to plan instruction and match instruction to exceptional student needs, flexible grouping, skilled content delivery, progress monitoring, and technology to support learning.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 416 | LITERACY PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION I | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, candidates provide literacy (i.e., language, reading, spelling, writing) instruction to exceptional students and use informal assessments and progress monitoring to guide instructional practices and differentiation. Supervision, coaching, and mentoring in implementing effective instructional strategies for exceptional students is provided by program faculty. The course develops the concept of documenting impact on student learning. Faculty advisors and the Director of Field Experience and Student teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate placements. (2 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 417 | PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION II | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this field-based course, candidates are introduced to teaching in a general education inclusion classroom. Candidates will interact with students and will plan and conduct small-group and large-group instruction in collaboration with the cooperating teacher. Faculty advisors and the Director of Field Experience and Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate practicum placements. (2 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 418 | PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION III | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this field-based course, candidates are introduced to teaching in a self-contained, special education classroom. Candidates will interact with students and will plan and conduct small-group and large-group instruction in collaboration with the cooperating teacher. Faculty advisors and the Director of Field Experience and Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate practicum placements. (2 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 419 | TEACHING LITERACY LAB | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, candidates provide literacy (i.e., language, reading, spelling, writing) instruction to exceptional students and use informal assessments and progress monitoring to guide instructional practices and differentiation. Supervision, coaching, and mentoring in implementing effective instructional strategies for exceptional students is provided by program faculty. The course develops the concept of documenting impact on student learning. This experience is offered in an on-campus facility that serves at-risk literacy learners and students with mild-moderate disabilities. (4 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 421 | FORMAL ASSESSMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course considers the theoretical, legal, ethical, and technical aspects of formal assessment in special education as well as models of nondiscriminatory assessment in the context of the requirements of special education law. Candidates gain knowledge of a variety of formal assessments including their purposes, characteristics, and limitations. They learn how to select, adapt, administer, score, interpret, and communicate the results of class-wide and individual assessments. Attention is given to collaborative assessment and educational planning based on assessment results, particularly the development Individual Education Program (IEP) goals, objectives, and recommendation for instruction.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 430 | INTRODUCTION TO READING ASSESSMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of reading assessment, with an emphasis on the multiple roles of assessment in today's schools: to evaluate, to classify, and to guide instruction. Students will be introduced to formal and informal measures of reading achievement and development, and will have scaffolded opportunities to administer, interpret, and use results for instructional planning. Additional topics to be covered include characteristics of informal and formal assessment (e.g., test construction, reliability and validity, and non-discriminatory testing), and the roles of assessment in the diagnosis and identification of reading disabilities. Students will be introduced to case report writing to deepen their understanding of reading difficulties as well as to clearly communicate assessment findings to a variety of individuals, including parents.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 431 | FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY: ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTION I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on understanding the foundations of literacy across the grade span, with a particular emphasis on the development of reading abilities among emergent and developing learners (preschool through 3rd grade). The history of theoretical models is explored in relation to current educational policies and practices. Topics include understanding the developmental process, utilizing a variety of informal assessments, and selecting research-based instructional practices. A strong emphasis is placed on designing standards-based lesson plans and the integration of narrative and expository texts to meet the unique needs of individual children, including those with identified disabilities and/or who exhibit learning challenges.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 432 | DEVELOPING LITERACY: ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on the development of literacy across the grade span, with a particular emphasis on the development of written language abilities among students at the intermediate and secondary levels (4th-12th grade). Topics include understanding the developmental process, utilizing a variety of formal and informal assessments, and selecting research-based instructional practices. A strong emphasis is placed on designing standards-based lesson plans to meet the unique needs of individual students. Strategies for providing differentiated instruction and interventions for students who require remediation of foundational skills, including those with identified disabilities and/or who exhibit learning challenges, are also explored.

SER 405 and status as an Advanced Masters Education student are prerequisites for this class.

SER 433 | ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING OF READING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the characteristics of children with reading difficulties, the process of diagnostic evaluation, test interpretation and report writing, and strategies for intervention. It is also designed to give practical experience with selected tests used to identify specific reading needs. Emphasis will be given to the use of case study material to analyze and interpret assessment data, write assessment results, and develop instructional recommendations.

SER 430 and status as a Graduate Education student are prerequisites for this class.

SER 434 | LITERATURE FOR SUCCESSFUL AND STRUGGLING READERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will familiarize students with different genres of quality children's literature and how to select and use books that are appropriate and meaningful for children and youth with and without reading disabilities. Students will discuss, analyze, and critique literary elements (author's style of writing, character development, setting, mood, and theme), determine estimated readability levels, and engage in reader response activities that promote critical discussion and a personal interaction with text. Students will become familiar with authors, illustrators, and books that represent diverse cultures, races, ethnic and ability groups, and develop meaningful literature extensions that support various curricular areas, develop literacy skills, and promote an enjoyment of reading.

Status as an Education student in the LSI program is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 435 | LITERACY PROGRAMS: CURRICULUM AND COLLABORATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will prepare students to assume a leadership role within a school or district in selecting, implementing, and evaluating literacy instructional programs. Students will be supported in using educational research to inform decision-making and identifying effective methods and curriculum, particularly for students with identified disabilities and/or those who exhibit learning challenges. Approaches to collaborating with relevant stakeholders (e.g., administrators, teachers, school-based professionals, parents, and community members) and advocating for curricular change will also be explored.

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 437 | LEADERSHIP AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN LITERACY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, an emphasis will be placed on developing the necessary skills to support school-based professionals in the effective implementation of literacy instruction and assessment. Applying models of professional development and coaching, students will identify a variety of resources to design professional development activities that include modeling, scaffolding, evaluation, and reflection. Aspects of change theory and its application to creating school-wide professional development plans will also be examined.

SER 405, SER 432, and (SER 543 or SER 544) and status as a Graduate Education student are prerequisites for this class.

SER 438 | LITERATURE-BASED AND CONTENT AREA LITERACY INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course addresses the integration of reading, writing, and oral language into the content areas. Candidates learn to assess the reading needs of students in content area courses and to design, select, modify, and evaluate a wide range of materials for the content areas. Attention is given to the characteristics of engaging, quality literature and well-structured, accessible expository texts, as well as applying these qualities to select books to engage K-12 students of a variety of backgrounds and skill levels. The course goes beyond teaching a set of isolated generic reading comprehension skills and provides explicit, research-based instructional strategies that can be applied across content areas to prepare students to read, write, talk, and think critically about complex texts, as well as to develop positive literacy identities and motivation to read.

SER 440 | SURVEY OF EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS: PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A survey of exceptional learners and characteristics of students with both high- and low-incidence disabilities, with consideration of placements appropriate for children with such disabilities. Emphasis on historical, theoretical, practical and legal implications and issues. The course also addresses the importance of developing and maintaining collaborative relationships with parents and professionals in order to maximize the academic, social, and emotional benefits of all learners.

SER 442 | SURVEY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EXCEPTIONAL LEARNER | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A survey of exceptional learners and characteristics of students with both high and low incidence disabilities, with consideration of alternative placements appropriate for children with various disabilities including the learning disabled. Emphasis on historical, theoretical, practical and legal implications and issues, as well as on the roles of special education professionals, including consultation and collaboration, in inclusion of exceptional learners.

SER 443 | PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS AND METHODS IN DIAGNOSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Principles of measurement and test construction including an evaluation of standardized test instruments. Principles of broad-based assessment involving case history, criterion-referenced tests and informal assessment. Emphasis on understanding the strengths and limitations of a wide variety of assessment instruments.

SER 446 | PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION OF THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Identification, characteristics, programs, schools, curricular variations, techniques for securing maximal development. Includes historical background, current legal and service provision issues including mainstreaming and inclusion.

T&L 425 and status as a Graduate Education student or status as a TEACH student are prerequisites for this class.

SER 456 | ADVANCED ISSUES AND STRATEGIES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will examine current trends, issues, and strategies in the field of special education. This is an advanced course that will consider topics related to inclusion, overrepresentation, and transition services such as modifying curriculum, positive behavioral supports, collaboration and co-teaching, teacher scheduling, student scheduling, behavioral and academic data collection within general education classrooms, communication with families, developing and implementing IEP's, and managing paraprofessionals. Prerequisite: LSI 442 or LSI 446 or equivalent.

SER 457 | SEMINAR AND RESEARCH IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines current research in special education including topics such as the social construction of special education; the assumptions of deficit vs. difference models of educational services; the overrepresentation of students of color and students from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds in special education; placement settings, inclusion, and service delivery models; and issues related to the short and long-term effects of special education on the lives of students with disabilities. Students select and pursue a topic of research interest and complete a professional portfolio. (Prerequisites: LSI 458, LSI 467, LSI 468, LSI 469).

SER 458 | TEACHING STUDENTS WITH HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Introduction to the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for students with high incidence disabilities across ages and levels of severity. Emphasis on developing an understanding of supportive learning environments, classroom and behavior management; developing collaborative practices with multiple service providers and families to meet the needs of diverse learners with high incidence disabilities. Strategies and materials for improving the social, emotional, and academic adjustment and functioning of students with high incidence disabilities are examined. Includes teaching social and emotional curricula; developing and implementing functional behavioral assessment; and monitoring growth and development in targeted areas. Strategies to increase the individual's self awareness, self-management, self control, self reliance, and self esteem are considered.

(SER 440 and Learning Behavior Specialist 1) or (SER 442 and SEE program) are prerequisites for this class.

SER 461 | COLLABORATIVE PRACTICE AND SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The purpose of this course is to develop pre-service teachers' understanding of the importance of developing and maintaining collaborative relationships with parents and professionals in educational environments. Students will develop an understanding of professional and legal responsibilities, networks, organizations, and services available for students with disabilities and their families. Students will also examine various educational models for working collaboratively with teachers, parents, and support personnel in classrooms and schools. Students will articulate a personal philosophy and strategies for working collaboratively with families, teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals within educational environments.

SER 462 | INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES I: ACCESSING GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses general theories of learning, instructional modifications, accommodations, grouping strategies, technology, and assessments used for helping to provide students with disabilities access to general education curricula. Course topics will focus on the effectiveness of these strategies for working with students with mild, moderate, and severe disabilities. Students will begin to articulate a personal philosophy and approaches designed to enhance the educational experiences of children and youth with disabilities and they will begin to examine the relationship between schooling and long term outcomes.

SER 464 | CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 1-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Current issues and problems in special education and reading will be discussed. Focus will be current research and best practices.

SER 465 | INDUCTION INTO THE FIELD OF EDUCATION I | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Designed primarily as a way to support student teachers through edTPA, this course utilizes a seminar approach to help students clarify their understanding of issues related to special education, general education, and teaching in urban schools. All students will prepare a an electronic portfolio based on planning for instruction and assessment, instructing and engaging the focus learner, and assessing learning.

SER 466 | INDUCTION INTO THE FIELD OF EDUCATION II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Designed primarily as a culminating course experience at the graduate level, this course utilizes a seminar approach to help students clarify their understanding of issues related to special education, general education, and teaching in urban schools. All students will prepare a portfolio based on their experiences within the graduate program. These portfolios will contain evidence of each student's development during the program and students will make connections between their own theoretical, philosophical, and professional orientations and the Urban Professional Multicultural Model.

SER 467 | TEACHING STUDENTS WITH HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Continued study of the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for students with high incidence disabilities across ages and levels of severity. Translation of diagnostic information into teaching strategies and development of an instructional plan (IEP) including transition needs. Emphasis on understanding theoretical models of literacy, literacy development, instructional strategies, and adjusting literacy instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners. Principles of diagnostic teaching will be discussed. Specific teaching techniques and materials will be reviewed, including appropriate uses of technology.

(SER 440 and Learning Behavior Specialist 1) or (SER 442 and SEE program) are prerequisites for this class.

SER 468 | TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Introduction to the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction of children with low incidence disabilities including functional assessment and instructional strategies, curricular options and adaptations, as well as levels of participation and accommodation in the general curriculum. Emphasis will be placed on understanding theoretical models of language development and communication, instructional strategies for language and communication, and adjusting language instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners. Candidates will explore individualized planning (IEPs), transition needs, integration of related services into the instructional program, and strategies and materials for improving the social, emotional, and academic functioning of diverse students with low-incidence disabilities.

(SER 440 and Learning Behavior Specialist 1) or (SER 442 and SEE program) are prerequisites for this class.

SER 469 | TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Continued study of the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for diverse students with low incidence disabilities. Focuses on addressing the intellectual, educational, physical, motor, health, social, and transitional needs of diverse students with more severe low incidence disabilities. Examination of etiological factors, growth, development, and long-term outcomes. Developing collaborative efforts with family and multiple care and service providers is addressed. Provides strategies to facilitate maintenance and generalization of both academic and non-academic skills across learning environments. Includes experiences with assistive technology, community-based instruction, and designing and implementing a functional curriculum when needed.

(SER 440 and Learning Behavior Specialist 1) or (SER 442 and SEE program) are prerequisites for this class.

SER 470 | STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 6 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Five school days per week in supervised teaching experience for 12-weeks. Candidates will also attend a student teaching seminar (LSI 471) one day per week where they will discuss special education topics related to this experience. Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate student teaching placements. (6 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student and LSI 440, 402, 403, 409, 410, 421, 416, 417, 418, 419 (or equivalent) are prerequisites for this class

SER 471 | STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar course provides support for candidates as they begin their student teaching experience. In addition and in conjunction with student teaching, candidates will complete a project designed to document a candidate's ability to impact student learning based on three to five days of teaching (edTPA).

Status as a Graduate Education student and LSI 440, 402, 403, 409, 410, 421, 416, 417, 418, 419 (or equivalent) are prerequisites for this class

SER 475 | METHODS OF TEACHING EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDENTS WITH LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will focus on examining the developmental and learning characteristics of young children with low incident disabilities. In specific, this course will focus on educating early childhood students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and those with Intellectual Disabilities. One of the primary goals of this course is to understand the learning needs of these children, and examine and evaluate various educational and therapeutic methods of working with them. A major part of this course will be devoted to characteristics associated with and interventions for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

SER 476 | SPECIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM AND STRATEGIES FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD: HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Study of the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for young children with high incidence disabilities. Emphasis placed on the development of supportive learning environments, using special curricular and behavioral management strategies for all early childhood settings; application of collaborative practices with multiple service providers and families to meet the needs of diverse learners with high incidence disabilities. Strategies and materials for improving the social, emotional, and academic adjustment and functioning of young children with high incidence disabilities are examined. Includes teaching social and emotional curricula; implementing functional behavioral assessment; and monitoring growth and development in targeted areas. Strategies to increase the young child are self-awareness, self-management, self control, self reliance, and self esteem are considered. Application of diagnostic information into teaching strategies and implementation of an instructional plan (IEP) is a central tenet of the course. (Pre-requisite: SCG 404 and T&L 427) 25 clock hours for Level II Experience.

SER 487 | FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR THE MIDDLE GRADES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Introduction to disabilities and the historical and legal foundations of special education. This course will prepare candidates to address the emotional, social, psychological, and cognitive needs of students with disabilities, with a particular emphasis on addressing the needs of students with reading and learning disabilities at the middle school level, including developmental and remedial instruction and support. ***This course counts toward Reading Teacher endorsement. Co-requisites for this course are MGE 421 and MGE 431. In this course, students will: 1.

MGE 401 is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 542 | PRACTICUM IN LITERACY ASSESSMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This practicum course provides students with an opportunity to apply theory to practice in assessing and teaching struggling literacy learners. Under the supervision of program faculty, students are responsible for completing a comprehensive assessment battery with a struggling literacy learner, interpreting results across assessments, developing and implementing an instructional plan, writing a case report, and discussing results with family members and/or other stakeholders.

SER 430 and status as a Graduate Education student are prerequisites for this class.

SER 543 | PRACTICUM IN LITERACY INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This practicum course provides students with an opportunity to apply theory to practice in teaching struggling literacy learners. Under the supervision of program faculty, students are responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating an individual learning plan for a client(s) that includes on-going assessment of learning objectives. Students write a case report, summarizing outcomes of instructional sessions, to communicate progress towards goals to a variety of individuals, including parents.

SER 431 and status as a Graduate Education student are prerequisites for this class.

SER 544 | PRACTICUM IN LITERACY INSTRUCTION, ASSESSMENT, AND COLLABORATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This practicum course provides students with an opportunity to apply theory to practice in teaching struggling literacy learners. Under the supervision of program faculty, students are responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating an individual learning plan for a client(s) that includes on-going assessment of learning objectives. Students write a case report, summarizing outcomes of instructional sessions, to communicate progress towards goals to a variety of individuals, including parents. Collaboration with peers for professional growth, which involves providing feedback on each other's practices, is also emphasized.

SER 431 and status as a Graduate Education student are prerequisites for this class.

SER 548 | INDEPENDENT STUDY IN READING AND OTHER LEARNING DISABILITIES | 2-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

REREQUISITE(S): Permission of instructor, department chair and associate dean. (2 credit hours)

SER 549 | THESIS RESEARCH IN SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A Master of Arts candidate conducts original research, writes a thesis, and presents an oral defense before a committee of faculty members. PREREQUISTE(S): SCG 410 and approved thesis proposal.

SER 552 | PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE WITH HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Six weeks of supervised field experience in a cooperating school working with students with high incidence disabilities, together with structured opportunities for feedback and discussion of issues and problems encountered.

SER 440, SER 458, and SER 467 are prerequisites for this class.

SER 553 | PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE WITH LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Six weeks of supervised field experience in a cooperating school working with low incidence disabilities, together with structured opportunities for feedback and discussion of issues and problems encountered.

SER 585 | STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Five school days per week in supervised teaching experience for a full academic quarter. Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate student teaching placements. Permission required. (4 credit hours)

SER 586 | STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Five school days per week in supervised teaching experience for a full academic quarter. Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate student teaching placements. Permission required. (4 credit hours)

SER 597 | EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION SPECIAL EDUCATION PRACTICUM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Supervised teaching in a cooperating school serving young children with disabilities for three hundred clock hours; arranged in collaboration with supervising faculty member and the Field Experience Office. Candidates will reflect upon their teaching experiences with young children with disabilities; collaborate with colleagues and instructor to identify alternative strategies for problematic situations. Application and approval required. Open only to DePaul students.

SER 600 | REGISTERED STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is open to students who are not registered for any other courses but need to complete requirements/assignments for previously taken courses. It provides access to University facilities. Permission of advisor required. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SER 606 | REVIEW OF LITERATURE | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This paper will give students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate written competence in a subfield of their disciplines and to enhance life-long learning. Specifically, they will broaden their knowledge base and inform themselves about a topic, issue, theory, etc., reviewing and synthesizing existing literature. To do so, students will need a variety of bibliographic skills including searching data bases. In other words, students will need to be able to ask and answer such questions as "What is known about? What are major issues and themes?" (0 credit hours)

SER 607 | INTEGRATIVE PAPER | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students will observe and/or participate in the reciprocal interaction of theory and practice, by investigating actual practice in the field as it relates to theory. This might take the form of investigating how a particular theory is applied in the field, developing a practical application of a theory, or conversely, developing/refining a theory based on investigations made in the field. In other words, as graduates encounter new theories and practices they will need to be able to investigate and evaluate them, asking and answering questions about "How theories work." (0 credit hours)

SER 608 | CAPSTONE IN SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Culminating experience(s) that help(s) students acquire the qualities of professionalism and leadership needed to play a significant role in one's professional education community. Students are expected to situate and understand educational issues in a larger context; keep current in and be able to organize and present a body of research on an education-related question; connect research with practical, professional activity; demonstrate mastery of a sub-field of a discipline; write in a format that meets accepted scholarly criteria and participate in an ongoing professional conversation. A final product such as master's paper(s), comprehensive exam, or collection of professional work products is required. (0 credit hours)

SER 625 | CANDIDACY CULMINATING PROJECT (STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING) | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing culminating projects for their program of study, including theses, papers, and final portfolios. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. Registration limited to three terms. (0 credit hours)

Status as a Graduate Education student is a prerequisite for this class.