International Studies (INT)

Menu

INT 100 | INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to contemporary international politics and the social theory that international studies scholars use to make sense of those politics. As an interdisciplinary field, students learn about international studies approaches that connect with history, geography, anthropology, economics and political science. Students critically engage with a set of global issues -- environmentalism, violence, migration, law, etc. -- that are selected by the course instructor. The course aims to present students with a general understanding of problems, approaches, and solutions to contemporary global issues.

INT 150 | GLOBAL CONNECTIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is intended for non-majors who are looking to add an international perspectives course to their study. It looks at the relationships between people living across the globe. Formerly INT 300.

INT 200 | INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

INT 200 serves as a bridge between economics and political economy. The course acquaints students with the standard theories of international trade and international monetary systems and introduces them to the interdisciplinary approaches that distinguish political economy from economics.

ECO 106 is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 201 | THE EVOLUTION OF THE MODERN NATION STATE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the complex relationship between race, gender, ethnicity and nationality and explores how this relationship shapes the evolution of the modern state. The historical consolidation of the nation state and the development of national institutions are analyzed, using examples from both 19th- and 20th-century Europe and the contemporary Third World. This course is the first in the required three-course sequence. For that reason, it is open to declared majors and minors only. Other students may take the course on a space-available basis, with the permission of the director.

Sophomore standing or above and status as an International Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 202 | INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT AND COOPERATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course analyzes the nature of power in the international arena, conflicts that emerge among nations, and processes through which conflict may be resolved. It includes a critical perspective on realism and the other mainstream theories of international relations.

INT 201 and status as an International Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 203 | INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH AND 21ST CENTURIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course evaluates the major social movements that have shaped international developments in the 20th and 21st centuries. Includes discussions of the varieties of socialism, race, colonization and decolonization of the Third World.

INT 201, INT 202 and status as an International Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 204 | CULTURAL ANALYSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course asks students to examine economic and cultural practices together so as to see the complicated ways in which such practices intersect and/or give rise to one another. Drawing on a variety of materialist perspectives, students study the economic and cultural instrumentality that different family structures and constructions of sexuality, gender, and race have held across time and place and how and why such structures have changed. Students also analyze the cultural logic of disposability in capitalism, both in terms of garbage-generation and the generation of surplus populations.

INT 205 | INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics discussed include the theory of comparative advantage, trade, immigration, alternatives to neoclassical trade theory, the third world debt crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, global financial institutions, and recurrent financial crises.

INT 200 is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 206 | IDENTITIES AND BOUNDARIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores how identity formation is shaped by cultural, historical, and political construction of barriers, borders, and boundaries, and how such formations are intertwined with ethnicity, race, nationality, gender and class.

INT 301 | SENIOR SEMINAR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course combines formal class work and independent research. Students conduct and present competent original academic research on a relevant and novel question of their choosing. Seminar topics vary, but projects typically require comparative research conducted in the student's target language.

Senior standing and declared International Studies major or minor are prerequisites for this course.

INT 302 | CRITICAL SOCIAL THEORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

All systems of knowledge are constituted through and in turn help constitute relations of power. This course introduces students to social theory as a reflexive practice that is aware of the power-infused conditions of its own production. Students who take this course should be able to examine the society around them with critical awareness, interrogate the naturalization of social knowledge, and become aware of the conditions through which knowledge, expertise, and transformative social practices are reflexively produced. Cross-listed with INT 401.

Admission to International Studies BA/MA program or permission of instructor is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 303 | INTERNATIONAL LAW | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course offers students the opportunity to engage in an examination of recent developments in international treaties, legal process and international organization. Topics may include refugees, trade law, criminal law and the establishment of the international criminal court, international labor law, environmental law, theories of international law, human rights and the relationship between international law and local economic development. Cross-listed with INT 410.

INT 304 | MIGRATION AND FORCED MIGRATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the integral role that different processes of mobility play in shaping today's world: emigration, immigration, displacement, refugee and internally displaced persons flows. Students study the causes and effects of population movements including push-pull factors, demographic, economic, and political variables. Students also look at the role of state and non-state actors and organizations. Cross-listed with INT 404.

INT 305 | CULTURE AND INEQUALITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course interrogates the concept of culture by showing the dynamic ways in which inequalities define and shape it. Students examine theories of culture and different approaches to studying culture to understand the relationship between the construction of cultural difference and social inequalities. Cross-listed with INT 405.

INT 306 | GLOBAL EMPIRES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students gain an acquaintance with theories of imperialism and post-colonial theory through historically situated studies. 'Power' serves as the generative concept for this course, to be understood as emergent at multi-scalar levels. Cross-listed with INT 406.

INT 307 | RACE, SEX, AND DIFFERENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Power circulates through systems of social hierarchies. Such hierarchies are the material basis through which difference is defined. This course examines theories of class, race, and sex to show how difference operates. Cross-listed with INT 407.

INT 308 | NATURE, SOCIETY AND POWER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of environmental issues pertinent to international studies. The reproduction of human societies occurs in a symbiotic relationship with the natural world, yet in the modern era nature has come to be increasingly conceptualized as a resource. This course explores the repercussions of this instrumental separation of nature from culture and society. Our conceptions of nature range from the physical environment to the human body; and the course explores a range of related political, economic, ecological, and socio-cultural issues from theoretical, comparative, and practical perspectives. Issues explored include those of environmental justice and social and political equity, and questions such as who defines what constitutes environmental issues, who is included or excluded from environmental concerns, and who benefits or is harmed by environmental changes occurring as a result of social interventions. Cross-listed with INT 408.

INT 309 | CRITICAL DEVELOPMENT THEORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The uneven integration of the world economy has been shaped by a succession of policies and theories of development, modernization, and globalization. This course investigates how these theories and policies have contributed to centrally organizing concepts such as poverty, inequality, growth, and progress, which have been instrumental in ordering contemporary societies. Cross-listed with INT 409.

INT 310 | TOPICS IN AFRICAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within the African continent. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 312 | THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT: PROSPECTS FOR PEACE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Lasting peace between Israelis and Palestinians can only be constructed with a clear, open, and critical understanding of the conflict's historical grounding. After a brief review of the connection of Jews and Arabs to the land of Israel/Palestine prior to the late 19th century, the course will study the rise of modern Jewish nationalism (Zionism) and its conflict with Palestinian nationalism covering the end of the Ottoman Empire, World War I promises to Jews and Arabs, the British Mandate of Palestine, the 1947 UN Partition Vote and subsequent 1948 War and the development of a wider Arab-Israeli conflict that has increasingly played out on the world stage with the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict at its center. The interaction or lack thereof between Jews and Arabs in Israel/Palestine over the past century as well as wider issues involving the Arab and Islamic world and the Diaspora Jewish community will be explored for their impact on this conflict. Efforts at conflict resolution will be examined through exposure to diverse points of view. The course seeks to synthesize an examination of religion, nationalism, and ethnic identity in order to gain some insight into the many dimensions of this conflict as well as the possibility of a peaceful resolution.

INT 313 | TERRORISM, THEIRS AND OURS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Today, the 'War on Terror' referred to US wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other locations across the world but before 1969, 'terror' referred primarily to violence at home, bombings, hijackings, assassinations, etc. Many nationalist leaders and freedom fighters even referred to themselves as terrorists. From the appearance of 'terror' as a political term during the French Revolution, this course traces "terror" in the context the forms of political violence deployed by states. After a decade and half of fighting, is "terrorism" defeated? Osama Bin Laden is dead but U.S. forces are still deployed all over the globe, the Guantanamo Bay prison still open, and "enhanced interrogation" continues. Post-Ba'athist Iraq has collapsed into a Shia rump state, a Kurdish de-facto state, and Sunni terror state. How did we arrive at this nightmare scenario? How did terrorism become a common tactic of the most disempowered people in the world? Why do states turn to torture, assassination and other forms of political violence? What do these forms of political violence tell us about the relationship between the state and violence? What does this mean for the future of direction of social change and dynamics of global conflict? This course provides perspective on these questions through an in-depth study of French and Russian Revolutions, the Cold War, and current War on Terror.

INT 314 | SUREVEILLANCE AND DIGITAL LABOR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Did you use a cell phone, ATM, or computer today? Did you update your Facebook status? Send off a text or tweet? If you did, someone was watching. Every day in our mundane activities we leave trails of information that are gathered up by private data brokers, advertisers, police officers and intelligence professionals. This data has increasingly come to reshape our lives, the way we sustain ourselves (i.e. work) and the way we enjoy our "off-time." The course locates our digitally mediated lives in a larger global division of digital labor that extends from the mining conflict minerals to sweatshop conditions in Chinese factories to the seemingly glamorous world of Google's software engineers. It considers the historic evolution of the advertising industry and the way information technology has reshaped housework. The course closes with a critical assessment of global labor and various proposals to ensure decent life for the workers of the world. In all, we explore the lives of our digital doppelganger, asses the struggles of digital workers, and try to find needed perspective on surveillance in the contemporary world.

INT 315 | SUREVEILLANCE AND THE STATE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Surveillance is a longstanding feature of political life. Historically and today, surveillance is one of the central means of governing. After all, institutionalized political authority "the state" cannot govern without systematized, orderly knowledge. The census, taxation, licenses, passports, and the endless forms and reporting requirements of state bureaucracies are all forms of administrative surveillance. They stand alongside the work operations of military, police, and intelligence agencies as integral legibility practices that make governing possible. In this class, we try to understanding the role of surveillance in political life. We ask the following questions: What is surveillance? Can we trace the cultural and historical roots of surveillance which today underlies the foundation of the modern state? What form does surveillance take in different situations and contexts? How does the emerging imperative of security shape the use of surveillance? How is the practice of surveillance related to scientific and technological developments? How is it changing our social life, our notions of private and public, our conceptions of public spaces, and our very understanding of the self? How can social theory inform our understanding of these developments?.

INT 316 | THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL LIFE OF OIL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Since the industrial revolution hydrocarbons have reshaped every aspect of human, social, and planetary life. This course is a critical and interdisciplinary examination of the wide-ranging impact of petroleum and its derivatives on the contemporary social relations of power, as well as on nature-society/human-environment interactions.

INT 317 | READING MARX'S CAPITAL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a close reading of volume 1 of Karl Marx's major work, Capital, a key text in contemporary social and political economic thought. Capital is a highly challenging, but ultimately rewarding text. Students are required to engage the text rigorously, and to work individually and in groups. The class format is a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, and oral presentations by students.

INT 318 | SOCIETY, POLITICS AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the formations of the historical and contemporary social relations of power in the Middle East by questioning the prevalent stereotypes of the region. The main focus will be on the critical investigation of relations of gender, the complexities of state formations, and the dynamics of the contemporary social counter-movements. The latter range from cosmopolitan popular uprisings (Green Movement in Iran, the Arab Spring), to ideological Islamist formations (ISIS, Muslim Brotherhood, etc.).

INT 319 | REVOLUTIONS AND PEASANT REBELLIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on theories on the international, national, regional, and local factors contributing to the weakening of states that result in revolutions, civil wars, and peasant rebellions. Case studies include revolutions in France, Russia, China, Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran. Contemporary social movements and insurrections are analyzed based on the theories of the course. Cross-listed with SOC 358 and LST 358.

INT 320 | TOPICS IN MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within the Middle East. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 321 | TOPICS IN SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within South Asia. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 322 | THE EUROPEAN FINANCIALCRISIS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course deals with the international political economy analysis of the origin, the development, and the future of the European Union. It includes papers and chapters of books of renowned economists like Paul Krugman, Roger Bootle, and Martin Wolf. Besides including general economic, political and social issues, it also comprehends case studies of individual countries.

INT 205 or ECO 106 is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 323 | PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW: PEACE, CONFLICT AND HUMAN RIGHTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to public international law, with an emphasis on the law of conflict and human rights. Students learn about the sources and functions of public international law--the law between and among nation states--and how this kind horizontal system of legal regulation deals with enforcement. The course presents the idea of transnational legal processes and authority that operate across levels, scales and institutions to constrain or shape state action and identity. We look at how the United States and other countries incorporate international law into their domestic legal systems. Contemporary topics covered may include, for example, cases from international criminal law, cyber war, torture or drones. The course then turns to human rights and humanitarian law, areas of law that seem potentially most in conflict with concepts of state sovereignty. We study the history and theory of human rights and the doctrine of responsibility to protect (a form of international executive authority) as well as recent cases in which human rights and humanitarian law have played large or determinative roles.

INT 324 | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC LAW FROM COLONIALISM TO GLOBALIZATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to international economic law. Students study the international legal framework regulating states, international financial institutions and firms in their market, development, investment, trade and public sector economic interactions and functions. We look at global economic structuring as a longer term project with roots in colonialism and Euro-American modernity. We examine attempts by formerly colonized countries to rewrite the rules of international economic law in the 1970s and how, more recently, human rights have served as a means by which to challenge entrenched power and wealth in the international system. Cases studied in the course may include, for example, litigation over transnational corporate responsibility for environmental destruction, contests over intellectual property rights in medicines versus human rights to health and access to such medicines, and an ethnographic account of the difficult process by which human rights have been translated into the culture of an organization such as the World Bank.

INT 325 | LAW OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANZIATIONS, NGOS AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to the law and function of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. We seek to understand global governance as a system by which power and authority may flow through international organizations that exist either above (intergovernmental) or below (nongovernmental) the level of states. Students will study the law and function of international courts and tribunals, including both global and regional bodies, as well as the ways civil society organizations (e.g., human rights NGOs) shape global justice outcomes. We examine how governance occurs through various rule of law and democracy promotion projects and how humanitarianism itself may become a form of governance. Students confront the paradox of institutionalizing (and professionalizing) global social justice demands through close study of recent cases involving NGO advocacy and/or by participating in the work of an internationally oriented service or social justice NGO.

INT 326 | GENDER AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course traces shifts in a feminist imaginary from its second wave to its contemporary complex iteration that encompasses ideas that students bring to class with them. Students will develop a literacy in the critique and evaluation of older sets of feminist questions and in a highly current engagement with similar questions.

INT 327 | POSTCOLONIALISM AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to studies of colonialism and postcolonialism that exist within International Relations (IR). The course materials will take a critical approach to concepts often taken for granted in studying international politics. This course introduces students to the main threads of this scholarly challenge and its attendant concepts -- Other, alterity, subalternity, subjectivity, knowledge, discourse, and power.

INT 328 | CULTURE AND POWER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on questions of culture and inequality and the contemporary application of social theory. Through close readings of empirically rich texts, students will evaluate the relationship between culture and various forms of inequality.

INT 329 | GEOGRAPHY, FOOD AND JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

While the need for food is universal, geographies of food production, distribution and consumption are anything but even. This leads to multiple issues of food injustice at a variety of scales. This course critically examines the contemporary global food system with the goal of providing students with skills and knowledge to engage in food justice activism. Students study the development of food systems and how inequalities have emerged in production, distribution and consumption. The course then explores food justice movements including the emergence of alternative food networks in the U.S and internationally. Assignments may engage students in local food projects and or/advocacy campaigns. Cross-listed with GEO 351 and PAX 351.

INT 330 | TOPICS IN EAST ASIAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within East Asia. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 333 | THE PSYCHE AND GEOPOLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course adds another layer of analytical complexity to our understanding of the world, namely, the "psychical unconscious" or psyche--the terrain of subjective irrationality. Using analytical tools that plumb the psyche, this course examines how identity formations of gender, sexuality, race, and person, are tied to unconscious anxieties which are also mediated by external demands and conditions. In so doing, we complicate international studies, allowing us to see how our own identity formation is tied to the vicissitudes of the world and how we are called into it.

INT 336 | TOPICS IN AUSTRALASIAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, and the neighboring islands of the Pacific Ocean. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 340 | TOPICS IN EUROPEAN STUDIES | 4-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within Europe. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 349 | WORLD ECONOMY: STATES, MARKETS, AND LABOUR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to competing economic and political frameworks that analyze the interaction of states, markets and societies. The overall theme of the course is the spread of capitalism and the tandem disembedding of economic relations from social relations beginning with the Industrial Revolution in the 18th century through to the early 21st century. Cross-listed with GEO 266.

INT 350 | TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES | 4-6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within Latin America and the Caribbean. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 352 | INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REGIONAL INEQUALITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course charts the economic transformation in the Third World /Global South. The first third of the course examines theories of development and underdevelopment before moving on to a critique of the concept of development as a modernist paradigm using a postcolonial framework. The rest of the course examines the restructuring of the agricultural, manufacturing and service sectors, including the financial sector, in non-Western countries. Students are recommended but not required to take INT 349 before this course. Cross-listed with GEO 215.

INT 353 | THE STATE AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN EAST ASIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focused on the role of the state in economic growth. The first half of the course studies the historical background, theory and criticism of the role of the state, including the developmental state, in economic growth. The second half examines paired case studies from different East Asian countries in the key moments of the incorporation of those states and their societies into the globalized economy compared to more recent assessments of their situations. Student projects are NOT restricted to East Asia. Students are recommended but not required to take INT 349 and INT 352 first. Cross-listed with GEO 315.

INT 360 | TOPICS IN DEVELOPMENT STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the problem of endemic poverty in the Third World and the various forms of public action designed to alleviate poverty. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 362 | LANGUAGE AND THE POLITICS OF TERROR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Politics is, among other things, the arena in which human bodies are broken. This course will concern itself with the breaking of human bodies through torture, genocide, war and poverty. Throughout, a focus will be maintained on the interface between bodies and language, on how bodies placed under extremes of pain and degradation lose their capacity for speech, and how language reaches its intrinsic limits in trying to represent bodies in pain.

INT 364 | TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in international trade, international finance, and international macroeconomics with attention to political context. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 365 | TOPICS IN WAR AND PEACE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in war, internal and ethnic conflict, terrorism, peace, and the construction of security. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 366 | TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL LAW | 4-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in international law, human rights, and other legal topics. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 368 | TOPICS IN GLOBAL CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in global cultural studies. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 371 | INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the international processes by which scientific knowledge concerning environmental change and degradation is translated into action on the parts of individuals, groups, states, and global institutions. We look at the political, legal, economic and cultural structures that reproduce the global propensity to disrupt or degrade the environment and that likewise prevent amelioration.

INT 374 | TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in organizations such as the United Nations, the Organization of American States, the World Trade Organization, the European Union, and similar organizations or trading blocs and their associated policy issues. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 382 | INTERNSHIP RESIDENCY | 2-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Used to register credit hours for both Chicago-based and off-campus residencies to complete internship agreements and approved independent research proposals. 2-8 credit hours.

INT 388 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Courses on topics in international studies not otherwise classifiable. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 389 | INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course provides 20-25 hours of service learning opportunities for students in organizations that are pursuing local activities based on international missions or globally-informed policies. The course meetings focus on student experiences and a discussion of state, sub-state, and non-state organizational structures in the international context.

INT 391 | TOPICS IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within Southeast Asia. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 392 | TOPICS IN CENTRAL ASIAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within Central Asia. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 394 | TOPICS IN MARITIME STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of regions defined by maritime areas rather than land masses. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 395 | TOPICS IN GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND REPRODUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in gender, sexuality, and reproduction taken in its broadest sense. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 396 | TOPICS IN GLOBAL URBANISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in cities and urban life in global, international, or comparative perspectives. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 398 | TOPICS IN NORTH AMERICAN STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Topics in the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within North America. (See schedule for current offerings).

INT 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Student-designed course incorporating reading and research conducted under faculty supervision. Variable credit hours.

INT 401 | CRITICAL SOCIAL THEORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

All systems of knowledge are constituted through and in turn help constitute relations of power. This course introduces students to social theory as a reflexive practice that is aware of the power-infused conditions of its own production. Students who take this course should be able to examine the society around them with critical awareness, interrogate the naturalization of social knowledge, and become aware of the conditions through which knowledge, expertise, and transformative social practices are reflexively produced.

Status as a Graduate International Studies student is a prerequisite for this course.

INT 402 | INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the historical development of the contemporary international political economy. The principle channels of interaction between states, economies, and international organizations are examined: trade and investment, diffusion of technology, institutional borrowing and adaptation, the workings of the international financial system, articulations of notions of equality and mobility. In the process, students also become familiar with a range of theoretical perspectives of IPE.

INT 403 | ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course builds on INT 402 by applying contemporary theories of political economy to topics that reflect current concerns.

INT 404 | MIGRATION AND FORCED MIGRATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the integral role that different processes of mobility play in shaping today's world: emigration, immigration, displacement, refugee and internally displaced persons flows. Students study the causes and effects of population movements including push-pull factors, demographic, economic, and political variables. Students also look at the role of state and non-state actors and organizations.

INT 405 | CULTURE AND INEQUALITY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course interrogates the concept of culture by showing the dynamic ways in which inequalities define and shape it. Students examine theories of culture and different approaches to studying culture to understand the relationship between the construction of cultural difference and social inequalities.

INT 401 is a prerequisite for this course.

INT 406 | GLOBAL EMPIRES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students gain an acquaintance with theories of imperialism and post-colonial theory through historically situated studies. 'Power' serves as the generative concept for this course, to be understood as emergent at multi-scalar levels.

INT 401 is a prerequisite for this course.

INT 407 | RACE, SEX AND DIFFERENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Power circulates through systems of social hierarchies. Such hierarchies are the material basis through which difference is defined. This course examines theories of class, race, and sex to show how difference operates.

INT 408 | NATURE, SOCIETY, AND POWER | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of environmental issues pertinent to international studies. The reproduction of human societies occurs in a symbiotic relationship with the natural world, yet in the modern era nature has come to be increasingly conceptualized as a resource. This course explores the repercussions of this instrumental separation of nature from culture and society. Our conceptions of nature range from the physical environment to the human body; and the course explores a range of related political, economic, ecological, and socio-cultural issues from theoretical, comparative, and practical perspectives. Issues explored include those of environmental justice and social and political equity, and questions such as who defines what constitutes environmental issues, who is included or excluded from environmental concerns, and who benefits or is harmed by environmental changes occurring as a result of social interventions.

INT 409 | CRITICAL DEVELOPMENT THEORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The uneven integration of the world economy has been shaped by a succession of policies and theories of development, modernization, and globalization. This course investigates how these theories and policies have contributed to centrally organizing concepts such as poverty, inequality, growth, and progress, which have been instrumental in ordering contemporary societies.

INT 410 | INTERNATIONAL LAW | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course offers students the opportunity to engage in an examination of recent developments in international treaties, legal process and international organization. Topics may include refugees, trade law, criminal law and the establishment of the international criminal court, international labor law, environmental law, theories of international law, human rights and the relationship between international law and local economic development.

INT 430 | LAW AND ECONOMICS IN CUBA | 3 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will introduce the Cuban legal, political, and economic system. Students will study major legal and regulatory issues in key sectors of the Cuban economy.

INT 490 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Special courses will be offered as students and faculty identify selected topics of common interest. This number is also used for students taking 300-level courses in the undergraduate International Studies program. In this case, students must have the approval of their thesis advisor and the director of the International Studies program before registering for the course.

INT 497 | POLITICS OF IMMIGRATION AND INTEGRATION IN FRANCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This study abroad course will focus on critical perspectives on immigration, refugees, and the politics of integration in France. The curriculum will analyze the history of immigration in France, the politics of identity and inclusion, and the contemporary refugee crisis in France. Sub-topics include security studies and anti-terrorism efforts, social welfare assistance, and gender politics.

INT 500 | TOPICS IN GLOBAL CULTURAL ANALYSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Provides students writing theses in the area of global culture with opportunities to read contemporary works in the field, including the fragmentation of identity, postcolonial historiography, and transnationalism. Students develop analytical skills that can be applied to their projects. The seminar is offered in the Spring of the first year; the course focuses on different topics under different instructors.

INT 502 | TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Provides students writing theses in the area of international political economy with opportunities to read contemporary works in the field, including growth theories, capital and labor flows, and transformation of regimes. Students develop analytical skills that can be applied to their projects. The seminar is offered in the Spring of the first year; the course focuses on different topics under different instructors.

INT 402 is a prerequisite for this course.

INT 504 | TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL LAW | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Course offers students the opportunity to engage in an examination of recent developments in international treaties, legal process and international organization. Topics have included refugees, trade law, criminal law and the establishment of the international criminal court, international labor law, environmental law, theories of international law, human rights and the relationship between international law and local economic development. Students work on the international law and institutional aspects of their theses.

INT 512 | THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT: PROSPECTS FOR PEACE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will examine the interactions between Jews and Arabs in Israel/Palestine over the past century as well as wider issues involving the Arab and Islamic world. Students will synthesize an examination of religion, nationalism, and ethnic identity in order to gain some insight into the many dimensions of this conflict as well as the possibility of a peaceful resolution.

INT 513 | TERRORISM, THEIRS AND OURS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course traces the concept of 'terror' as it is applied to different forms of political violence deployed by states, individuals, and oppressed peoples in both historical and contemporary situations. Students will investigate the relationship between the state and violence and the future of dynamics of global conflict.

INT 514 | SURVEILLANCE AND DIGITAL LABOR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Did you use a cell phone, ATM, or computer today? Did you update your Facebook status? Send off a text or tweet? If you did, someone was watching. Every day in our mundane activities we leave trails of information that are gathered up by private data brokers, advertisers, police officers and intelligence professionals. This data has increasingly come to reshape our lives, the way we sustain ourselves (i.e. work) and the way we enjoy our "off-time." The course locates our digitally mediated lives in a larger global division of digital labor that extends from the mining conflict minerals to sweatshop conditions in Chinese factories to the seemingly glamorous world of Google's software engineers. It considers the historic evolution of the advertising industry and the way information technology has reshaped housework. The course closes with a critical assessment of global labor and various proposals to ensure decent life for the workers of the world. In all, we explore the lives of our digital dopplegangers, asses the struggles of digital workers, and try to find needed perspective on surveillance in the contemporary world.

INT 515 | SURVEILLANCE AND THE STATE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the role of surveillance in social and political life. Historically and today, surveillance is one of the central means of governing. Students will examine the cultural and historical roots of surveillance, the relationship between surveillance and security, and how different forms of surveillance are practiced in specific political and cultural contexts.

INT 516 | THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL LIFE OF OIL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Since the industrial revolution hydrocarbons have reshaped every aspect of human, social, and planetary life. This course is a critical and interdisciplinary examination of the wide-ranging impact of petroleum and its derivatives on the contemporary social relations of power, as well as on nature-society/human-environment interactions.

INT 517 | READING MARX'S CAPITAL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a close reading of volume 1 of Karl Marx's major work, Capital, a key text in contemporary social and political economic thought. Capital is a highly challenging, but ultimately rewarding text. Students are required to engage the text rigorously, and to work individually and in groups. The class format is a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, and oral presentations by students.

INT 518 | SOCIETY, POLITICS AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will examine the formations of the historical and contemporary social relations of power in the Middle East. The main focus will be on the critical investigation of relations of gender, the complexities of state formations, and the dynamics of the contemporary social counter-movements.

INT 522 | THE EUROPEAN FINANCIAL CRISIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course deals with the international political economy analysis of the origin, the development, and the future of the European Union. It includes papers and chapters of books of renowned economists like Paul Krugman, Roger Bootle, and Martin Wolf. Besides including general economic, political and social issues, it also comprehends case studies of individual countries.

INT 205 or INT 402 or INT 403 or ECO 106 is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 523 | PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW: PEACE, CONFLICT AND HUMAN RIGHTS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an introduction to public international law, with an emphasis on the law of conflict and human rights. Students learn about the sources and functions of public international law--the law between and among nation states--and how this kind horizontal system of legal regulation deals with enforcement. The course presents the idea of transnational legal processes and authority that operate across levels, scales and institutions to constrain or shape state action and identity.

INT 524 | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC LAW FROM COLONIALISM TO GLOBALIZATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an introduction to international economic law. Students study the international legal framework regulating states, international financial institutions and firms in their market, development, investment, trade and public sector economic interactions and functions. This course pays particular attention to the roots of global economic structuring in colonialism and how that history shapes the ways in which formerly colonized countries engage with international economic law.

INT 525 | LAW OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS, NGOS AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an introduction to the law and function of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. We seek to understand global governance as a system by which power and authority may flow through international organizations that exist either above (intergovernmental) or below (nongovernmental) the level of states. Students will study the law and function of international courts and tribunals, including both global and regional bodies, as well as the ways civil society organizations shape global justice outcomes.

INT 526 | GENDER AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course traces shifts in a feminist imaginary from its second wave to its contemporary complex iteration that encompasses ideas that students bring to class with them. Students will develop a literacy in the critique and evaluation of older sets of feminist questions and in a highly current engagement with similar questions.

INT 527 | POSTCOLONIALISM AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to studies of colonialism and postcolonialism that exist within International Relations (IR). The course materials will take a critical approach to concepts often taken for granted in studying international politics. This course introduces students to the main threads of this scholarly challenge and its attendant concepts -- Other, alterity, subalternity, subjectivity, knowledge, discourse, and power.

INT 528 | CULTURE AND POWER | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on questions of culture and inequality by closely reading an empirically rich piece of work that examines the relationship between the two. Students will read Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction alongside David Swartz's 'handbook' as well as their own selection of supplemental readings (from Appendix 1). This seminar course evaluates questions of the relation between culture and various forms of inequality and aims to assess the ways in which Bourdieu's thinking is contemporarily applicable. As Bourdieu offers a starting point for a reflexive method, students will have the opportunity to learn a form of 'method' (or approach) to critical social analysis. The readings will expand students' command of the complex theoretical language that can be indispensable in developing complex interdisciplinary analyses of international politics. By the end of the course, students will have a solid grasp of Bourdieu's contribution to Social Theory, and arguments regarding the intersection between culture and inequality.

INT 529 | GEOGRAPHY, FOOD AND JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

While the need for food is universal, geographies of food production, distribution and consumption are anything but even. This leads to multiple issues of food injustice at a variety of scales. This course critically examines the contemporary global food system with the goal of providing students with skills and knowledge to engage in food justice activism. Students study the development of food systems and how inequalities have emerged in production, distribution and consumption. The course then explores food justice movements including the emergence of alternative food networks in the U.S and internationally. Assignments may engage students in local food projects and or/advocacy campaigns.

INT 533 | THE PSYCHE AND GEOPOLITICAL ECONOMY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course adds another layer of analytical complexity to our understanding of the world, namely, the "psychical unconscious" or psyche--the terrain of subjective irrationality. Using analytical tools that plumb the psyche, this course examines how identity formations of gender, sexuality, race, and person, are tied to unconscious anxieties which are also mediated by external demands and conditions. In so doing, we complicate international studies, allowing us to see how our own identity formation is tied to the vicissitudes of the world and how we are called into it. Cross-listed with INT 333.

INT 537 | MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to studying forced migration and its implications for international security. The course will consider security of refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin, on their journey, and at their destinations. It will also consider security concerns and challenges of host nations, regional bodies, and the international community.

INT 562 | LANGUAGE AND THE POLITICS OF TERROR | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Politics is, among other things, the arena in which human bodies are broken. This course will concern itself with the breaking of human bodies through torture, genocide, war and poverty. Throughout, a focus will be maintained on the interface between bodies and language, on how bodies placed under extremes of pain and degradation lose their capacity for speech, and how language reaches its intrinsic limits in trying to represent bodies in pain.

INT 570 | FIELD RESEARCH IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES | 4-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Supervised independent research aimed at acquiring primary data for the thesis.

INT 571 | INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines the international processes by which scientific knowledge concerning environmental change and degradation is translated into action on the parts of individuals, groups, states, and global institutions. We look at the political, legal, economic and cultural structures that reproduce the global propensity to disrupt or degrade the environment and that likewise prevent amelioration.

INT 582 | INTERNSHIP RESIDENCY | 2-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Used to register credit hours for both Chicago-based and off-campus residencies to complete internship agreements and approved independent research proposals. 2-8 credit hours.

INT 589 | INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course provides 20-25 hours of service learning opportunities for students in organizations that are pursuing local activities based on international missions or globally-informed policies. The course meetings focus on student experiences and a discussion of state, sub-state, and non-state organizational structures in the international context.

INT 590 | RESEARCH METHODS: EXTENDED CASE STUDY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course gives students a foundation in the techniques and theories involved in the extended case study research method.

INT 401 is a prerequisite for this course.

INT 591 | THESIS RESEARCH I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students will take this course as an independent study with a thesis advisor, during which they will write and defend their thesis proposal.

INT 590 is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 592 | THESIS RESEARCH II: THESIS WRITING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students will take this course as an independent study with a thesis advisor, during which they will write and defend their thesis.

INT 401 is a prerequisite for this course.

INT 599 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 4-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Student-designed course incorporating reading and research conducted under faculty supervision. Variable credit hours.

INT 601 | CANDIDACY CONTINUATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This 0-credit hour course is available to master's degree candidates who are actively working toward the completion of a thesis, project, or portfolio. Enrollment in this course is limited to three quarters and requires thesis/project advisor and graduate director approval and demonstration to them of work each quarter. Enrollment in this course allows access to the library and other campus facilities. This course carries and requires the equivalent of half-time enrollment status. The student may be eligible for loan deferment and student loans. This course is graded as pass/fail. (0 credit hours)

INT 699 | CANDIDACY MAINTENANCE | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This 0-credit hour course is available to graduate students who are not registered for a course in a given quarter but need to maintain active university status. Enrollment in this course is limited to three quarters and requires permission of the graduate director. Enrollment in this course allows access to the library and other campus facilities. This course does not carry an equivalent enrollment status and students in it are not eligible for loan deferment or student loans. This course is not graded. (0 credit hours)