Modern Languages (MOL)

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MOL 197 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN LANGUAGES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

MOL 198 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 199 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 210 | CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an interdisciplinary blend of the classical traditions of myth, literature and philosophy, concentrating on myth. It endeavors to place Classical literature into its historical, social and cultural contexts. Students will learn significant myths and the names and functions of the most important characters in them. They will investigate how the ancients used traditional narratives and images to explore, explain and experiment with ideas about themselves and their surroundings in those contexts. Learning about how myth is variously interpreted (as for example by means of theories of myth-interpretation) as well as basic methods of literary criticism (e.g., analysis of language, content, structure, etc.), students will employ ways to identify, understand and interpret the different types of communication present in myth-literature. As they move chronologically through the ancient world students will observe how myths change to reflect differing individual and collective concerns, as well as the specific interests (and so the significant aspects of discourse) of authors and audiences as conditions change. Students will also learn about literary genres, including poetry, tragedy and prose, their properties and distinctions and discover how genres also reflect audiences and times. Students will read and evaluate modern views of myth in order to understand how myth is open to multiple interpretations and upon what sounder bases myth is to be interpreted. While analyzing myths' diversity in various forms of literature, students will come to comprehend what mythology meant to the ancients, as well as those facets and ingredients of myth that are universal, enduring, and meaningful today.

MOL 211 | ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN EPIC | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course centers upon the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil's Aeneid and endeavors to place these epic poems into their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the definition of epic as a literary genre and discover how this genre evolved to reflect audiences and times. They will learn the components of epic language, in particular, literary devices and structural features (e.g., formulas, nested stories, epic similes). They will be able to describe the plots of the three epics and know the main- and mid-level human characters, gods, and goddesses. They will be able to define and better understand the meanings of "hero" and "heroism." Students will be able to express mature appreciation for the epics as whole works. Learning how the epics are variously interpreted as well as basic methods of literary criticism (e.g., analysis of language, content, structure, etc.), students will employ these as ways to understand and interpret the poems. As they read, learn and evaluate modern views of the epics, students will also acquire better means to distinguish critically between views and interpretations. A strong emphasis in this class will be upon the vital connections between past and present, and how students can become more aware of and understand important lasting concepts such as heroism, leadership, self-definition, etc. Finally, students will relate these stories to modern story-telling in order to understand how the heroes of the ancient Greeks live with us today. In short, they will interpret what epic poetry offered ancient listeners and what it has to teach modern readers. The classical tradition is rich with meaning and significance, even to modern 21st century adults and this class will not only be an exploration of the culture and instruction of the ancient world through epic, but an investigation of what classic motifs remain with us today.

MOL 212 | ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN TRAGEDY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Classical Tragedy introduces students to the authors, social contexts and performances of ancient Greek drama. Students will learn how to interpret the "myths" presented on the ancient Greek stage and how to apply what they have learned to detect and to interpret the moral, social and political issues raised in them. They will learn the names, works and careers of the principal tragedians: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Students will learn to assess the formal and aesthetic properties of the works of different tragedians. Emphasis will be given to specifics of performance and to seeing a play in the "theater of the mind" as well as gaining command of relevant terminology, e.g., parodos, peripeteia, mimesis, catharsis, etc. Students will learn to outline the plot, argument and key themes of each work clearly and will gain an understanding of the historical context and social conditions motivating each work. The main themes of Greek tragedy (e.g., power, gender, justice, violence etc.) invite comparison to themes of contemporary theater and film. Students will acquire an awareness of ancient Greek tragedy in its connection with our own theatrical and literary culture, and they will reflect upon the influence of Greek drama on modern stage and literature. They will be able to employ several concepts in the analysis of Classical Tragedy.

MOL 213 | ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN COMEDY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course students encounter selected landmarks of Greek and Roman satirical literature; they learn important theories of interpretation, theories of humor as well as secondary interpretative opinions about the works assigned. They will be engaged in the course material primarily through readings, lectures and discussions. Students also view or read whole or selected excerpts of modern visual or written literature that will supplement their primary and secondary readings. The roots of comedy extend deep into antiquity. This course, however, endeavors to train intelligent critics of modern satire. Students study authors ancient and modern in order to sharpen their critical abilities and to gain insight into Athens, Rome as well as the contemporary cultural milieu. Students are challenged to regard satire as a critical force. Students encounter comic dramatists with special interest in how the most serious material--war, death, injustice, suffering--is criticized in a way that they can enjoy. With the help of comic theorists students will explore the boundaries of the comic, the social and political function of comedy in different cultural contexts, and the varieties of humor: mad, cathartic, aggressive, destructive, defensive, celebratory etc. Students will confront a host of related issues such as the nature of tragic pleasure, the language and metaphors of humor, and the legal limits of satirical discourse.

MOL 214 | THE CLASSICAL FEMININE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course attempts to recover the experiences of women in ancient Greece and Rome by examining literary texts and archaeological remains that concern them. Students will investigate women's roles in public and private life and gauge the changes in their situation and representation over time. Given that Greece and Rome are commonly credited as the foundations of Western society, students will frequently discuss the similarities and differences between ancient and contemporary attitudes toward sex and gender. The task is challenged by the paucity of sources that were produced by the women of antiquity themselves; often our view is said to be "filtered through a male lens.

MOL 215 | ANCIENT SCIENCE AND ITS LANGUAGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students will study ancient science, its proponents and its epochs, later concentrating on the language of science. Students will learn successive highlights of inquiry within scientific culture, beginning in prehistory and ancient Egypt. As they proceed from Egypt through the ancient Greek enlightenment and onto Roman science and its decline, students will learn the basics of how representative thinkers evaluated and altered "contemporary" understanding. Students will witness firsthand the ever-changing perspective of scientific knowledge and compare it with modern empirical methodology. They will acquire an ability to interpret varying viewpoints of "science" through an overview of changes of perception combined with selected readings from the works of ancient philosophers, physicists and physicians. Students will also learn the composition of scientific terminology; they will learn how to analyze, dissect and compose scientific terms based upon the Classical languages of ancient Greece and Rome.

MOL 243 | JAPANESE POETRY IN TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Survey of Japanese poetry in English translation, with selections of representative authors from the Classical and Modern periods.

MOL 244 | CLASSICAL CHINESE I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Classical Chinese is predominantly a literary language, which has played a linguistically and culturally unifying role among the many vernacular languages of China. Permission of instructor, some Mandarin Chinese preferred.

MOL 245 | CLASSICAL CHINESE II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Classical Chinese is predominantly a literary language, which has played a linguistically and culturally unifying role among the many vernacular languages of China. MOL 244 or equivalent recommended.

MOL 246 | CLASSICAL CHINESE III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Classical Chinese is predominantly a literary language, which has played a linguistically and culturally unifying role among the many vernacular languages of China. MOL 245 or equivalent recommended.

MOL 247 | CHINA AND SOCIAL MEDIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to discuss various China-related social issues reported on Chinese and American social media. Students are required to read select materials about China from both American social media and the translated version of Chinese social media and participate in active class discussions on the readings. The materials aim to help students understand how and why salient social issues in China are reported divergently on state-run as compared to unofficial social media in China as well as on social media based in China as compared to those based in the U.S. Students will learn to use the knowledge of Chinese philosophy, history, contemporary political and economic contexts, censorship and journalism to understand what shapes Chinese media reports.

MOL 248 | CHINESE CALLIGRAPHY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to the art of Chinese calligraphy. Hands-on practice as well as history and theory of the art. This course is open to students with no background in Chinese calligraphy, language, literature, or culture.

MOL 249 | MODERN CHINESE LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore facets of Modern China, with special attention to how language and culture intertwine.

MOL 250 | CHINESE CINEMA -- A WINDOW ON CHINA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course studies Chinese cinema, the visualized artistic reflection of Chinese society, ideology, and culture from four perspectives: Historical, directorial, thematic, and artistic. It will cover the history of Chinese cinema, from the birth of the first Chinese film through the Silent Age, 1st Golden Age, 2nd Golden Age, Pre- and-Post-War Era, Pre- and-Post "Cultural Revolution" Period, and the Fifth Generation up to the emerging Sixth generation and beyond. Through substantial exposure and analysis of selected movie classics and subsequent classroom discussions, students will be well informed about the major developments and trends of each period in the history of Chinese cinema. Students will also explore the historical backgrounds, artistic characteristics, and key directors and stars of important Chinese movies as well as cinematic terminologies, the formation of Chinese cinematic theories, and innovative cinematic techniques.

MOL 260 | EAT ITALY: THE HISTORY, CULTURE AND POLITICS OF ITALIAN FOOD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course students will look at the modern and contemporary history of Italian food in Italy and the United States to explore and reflect on the material, symbolic, personal, and political implications of this global commodity. Through a variety of primary sources both textual and visual and multidisciplinary critical sources, students will discuss the symbolic and material forces that shaped food choices; the production, marketing, preparation, and consumption of meals; and the access to food from Italy's Unification to the present. Weekly topics will span from cinema's most memorable Italian meals to ethnographic studies of everyday meals in twenty-first century Italian families; from the success of Pellegrino Artusi's cookbook to the star system of Italian-American celebrity chefs to Italian-American culinary literature. The course will conclude with a small-group practicum in which students will document and reflect upon their own process in preparing and eating an Italian meal.

MOL 261 | TERROIRS DU SUD: LAND, FOOD, AND LIFE IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The term terroir, defined by Angela Murrills as "a marvelous French word that encompasses soil, sun, and rain and how they all affect what grows there" (66), is typically associated with the geography of wine. The notion of terroir, however, extends beyond the fruits of the vine to impact the lives and behavior of people. This partner course to GEO 350 (The World of Wine) explores the concept of terroir in French culture, cuisine, history, politics, and literature. Through readings, discussion, film, and presentations, students in MOL 261 will discover the symbiotic relationship between the land of the South of France and its inhabitants. The readings will consist of firsthand narratives from Anglophone expatriates who have chosen to live in the regions of Languedoc and Provence, as well as translated fictional stories from Southern French authors. These primary texts will be supplemented by lectures, student presentations, and film. The objective of MOL 261 is for students to gain a holistic cultural understanding of land, food, and life in the South of France, an appreciation that they can then deepen during the short-term study abroad portion of the course in Montpellier, France.

GEO 350 is a co-requisite for this class.

MOL 277 | TURN OF THE CENTURY VIENNA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore a number of the prominent players who were active in Vienna during the turn of the century, such as Sigmund Freud, Gustav Klimt, Arthur Schnitzler, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Gustav Mahler. Students will examine, through primary and secondary texts, and works of art, music and film, the lasting impact of their contributions on the development of thinking and innovation in the twentieth, and indeed even twenty-first, centuries.

MOL 282 | MODERN AFRICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Themes and theories of postcolonial studies in relation to African culture, politics and literature. Evaluation of novels, criticism, and movies to provide an introduction to the complex, highly heterogeneous experience of modern African literature.

MOL 297 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN LANGUAGES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

MOL 298 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 299 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 300 | PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Supervised experience in teaching, tutoring, interpreting, editing, writing or other professional exercises of language skills.

MOL 306 | WARRIORS, WITCHES, FIREBIRDS AND VAMPIRES: INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN FOLKLORE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to the rich and dynamic body of Russian folk texts and belief. Course readings will include epic poems, skazki (fairy tales), ballads, legends, incantations, and elements of popular culture. Students will learn and apply contemporary theories of folklore and traditional folk belief. The course will touch on the role of Russian folklore themes in literature and film. Emphasis on primary source materials with supplemental theory and history. Discussions in English. Readings in English. Cross-listed with RUS 306.

MOL 307 | TOPICS IN CHINESE LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an introduction to the history, art and interpretation of classical and modern Chinese literature. Since all readings are in English, students will also explore ways of inter-media re-writing of Chinese literature in the age of globalization.

MOL 308 | TOPICS IN JAPANESE LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Taught in English. Consult schedule for current offering.

MOL 309 | THE NOVELIST'S WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics.

MOL 310 | JAPANESE CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Japanese Culture is a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary exploration of Japanese culture, especially as regards cultural figures such as "geisha," "samurai," and "Hello Kitty." These figures intersect with various critical discourses on gender, sexuality, nationalism, exoticism, orientalism, modernity, tradition, art, and aesthetics. They have also generated both praise and criticism. These questions are not only specific to the cultural figures as listed above but also run deep in society. The course will also examine other historical and ideological constructions in Japan and the West, especially in the United States.

MOL 311 | TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Masterpieces, themes and genres of French literature from its origins to the present day.

MOL 312 | TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Masterpieces, themes and genres of German literature from its origins to the present day.

MOL 313 | TOPICS IN ITALIAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Masterpieces, themes and genres of Italian literature from its origins to the present day.

MOL 314 | TOPICS IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Masterpieces, themes and genres of Russian literature from its origins to the present day.

MOL 315 | TOPICS IN HISPANIC LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Masterpieces, themes and genres of Hispanic literature from its origins to the present day.

MOL 316 | TOPICS IN THE RUSSIAN NOVEL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will allow students to read and analyze novels from important Russian authors such as Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, as well as others. Students will write essays and participate in individual and group projects in the format of Round-Table discussion. Cross-listed with RUS 316, CPL 319, and ENG 389. Formerly MOL 368.

MOL 317 | TOPICS IN THE RUSSIAN SHORT STORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The study of a representative selection of Russian short fiction concentrating on the great 19th-century masters such as Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gorky, and Korolenko.

MOL 318 | MASTERPIECES OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore masterpieces of Russian literature from a variety of genres: plays, novels, short stories and poetry. Works by authors such as Tolstoy, Chekov, Dostoyevsky, Gogol, Nabokov, Pushkin, Turgenev, Akhmatova, Mayakovsky, Pasternak and Yevtushenko will be read within their historical context to provide a basis for literary appreciation and analysis.

MOL 319 | WORLD OF THE CINEMA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Critical analysis of cinematic development.

MOL 320 | MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and works of Japan's modern period, from the 18th century through the 21st century. We will examine writers, works, and literary institutions in historical context to explore how Japanese writers engaged the modern era. This was the period when modern literature, more specifically the novel (shosetsu), was emerging internationally as a new technology of state-building. Modern Japan was highly literate with a flourishing popular culture that included diverse literary forms (high and low) that would be refashioned, contested and sometimes abandoned as the institution of literature was established by the turn of the 20th century, although not without ongoing contestation. Themes may include: the West, Orientalism and Counter-Orientalism; protest literature by women, workers and ethnic minorities; and modernism and modernity. Authors may include: Higuchi Ichiyo, Natsume Soseki, Yosano Akiko, Akutagawa Ryunosuke, Kobayashi Takiji, Murakami Haruki, and others.

MOL 321 | CLASSICAL JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Classical Japanese literature, in English translation, from the earliest periods up to the Meiji era.

MOL 322 | CULTURAL HISTORY OF PARIS | 4-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A study of Paris from its origins in Roman times to the present day, this study abroad course is composed of readings (primary and secondary), lectures, and on-site visits that reveal the unfolding history of Paris.

MOL 323 | CHINA'S CULTURAL SOFT POWER AND ITS FUTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Soft power is a political term coined by Joseph Nye in the 1980s to refer to a country's ability to attract and persuade other countries without coercion. According to certain metrics, a country's soft power can be measured by the quality of a country's political institutions, the extent of their cultural appeal, the strength of their diplomatic network, the global reputation of their higher education system, the attractiveness of their economic model, and a country's digital engagement with the world. Within three decades, China has transformed from an impoverished and self-secluded nation into a global powerhouse challenging the world's status quo. This course will explore China's soft power by analyzing multiple aspects of Chinese culture and its contemporary society and understand the prospects of China in the next generation. We will focus on the dramatic social cultural changes in China in the past decades that reflect its soft power or lack thereof and explore its long-term impact on the rest of the world. The readings and class discussions will engage topics on China's historical dynamics, unique cultural traditions, politics, economy, and international relations. Students will be exposed to and analyze comparative views analyzing and predicting China's future.

MOL 325 | QUEER JAPAN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course surveys representations of same-sex sexuality in Japan from the 14th century to the present day. Students will explore the intersection of history, politics, art, and culture through historiography, literature, film, photography, music, cartoons, and animation, examining "traditional" male-male sexuality, the emergence in the modern era of texts reflecting female-female sexuality, as well as the formation of new consciousness throughout the 20th century and into the 21st. Students will look at critical issues for sexual minorities in Japan, including coming out and AIDS activism, paying particular attention to their potential relevance to sexual minorities and politics in the US.

MOL 333 | HISPANIC WOMEN WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Same topics as Spanish 322, but taught in English; not counted as part of a Spanish major or minor.

MOL 334 | EXPLORING MULTICULTURALISM THROUGH LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Various topics.

MOL 335 | EXPLORING SOCIAL DIVERSITY IN LATIN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Readings and instruction in English; not counted as part of a Spanish major or minor. Cross-listed as LST 201.

MOL 337 | CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA THROUGH ITS LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The study of English translations of a variety of Latin American literary works that highlight key historical, political, social, and artistic trends in the region.

MOL 340 | ARAB CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the first in a series of three hybrid courses in the Arabic Studies Program that examine Arab culture. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of Arab culture and a clear understanding of its elements and historical events that shaped it. Emphasis will be placed on cultural aspects shared by all Arabs. The course will examine the general concept of culture, and study the elements that form Arab culture. It will also explore the impact of critical factors and events in Arab history from pre-Islamic to modern time on the evolvement of Arab culture as we know it today. Students will gain insight into the way Arabs think by examining Arabs' cultural practices, products, and perspectives. In addition to learning about Arabs and Arab culture, students will practice using technology to research, blog, discuss, and contribute to open-sources on topics related to Arab culture. Students will also have the opportunity to meet and interact with Arabs and the Chicago Arab heritage community.

MOL 341 | MEDIA IN THE ARAB WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is one of a series of three culture/media/and literature courses strongly recommended for a major in Arabic Studies. It is also an elective course that can be taken by students at large. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the Arab media--including newspapers, television, and the Internet--as a product of Arab culture. Students will examine Arab media to gain better understanding of its nature, role, content, and influence within emphasis on the context of Arab societies and the factors influencing their people such as politics, religion, technology, and Western influence. In addition to the assigned readings from the textbook and a variety of sources that represent various perspectives, a sample of products of Arab media including newspapers, TV programs, news, cartoons, and blogs will be examined to better understand Arab media. Furthermore, elements and factors that impact Arab media will be analyzed and discussed. The impact of the West on Arab media, and the future of Arab media will also be discussed.

MOL 342 | MODERN ARABIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is one of a series of three courses offered by the Arabic Studies program as part of the major and minor in Arabic Studies. It provides a survey of modern Arabic literature and focuses on various genres, including poetry, plays, short stories, and novels. Works by major Arab writers and poets representing various regions and content related to Arab culture are examined and analyzed to develop an appreciation for Arabic literature and a deeper understanding of Arab culture. This is a hybrid course. Students meet onsite one day a week for 2 hours and conduct work online to satisfy the course requirements. Specific assignments are provided each week through D2L and Ning social network for the online portion of the course.

MOL 349 | TEACHING MODERN LANGUAGES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Teaching Modern Language course is specially designed for the teacher who is about to begin his/her career teaching foreign languages at the K-12 levels. This course is also designed for accomplished and experienced teachers who wish to receive new information on current theory and practice. The course has as an overall objective to provide learners with the theoretical and practical tools that will enable them to become critical and reflective foreign language practitioners.

MOL 350 | METHODS OF TEACHING MODERN LANGUAGES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Provides training in the theory and methods of teaching foreign languages in the elementary school (FLES). Designed for both pre-service and in-service teachers. Pre-service teachers include foreign language majors interested in elementary school teaching and elementary majors who are proficient in a foreign language and interested in teaching FLES. In-service teachers include elementary teachers proficient in a foreign language who are teaching or who are interested in teaching FLES and secondary trained teachers who are teaching or who are interested in teaching FLES. In order to meet the objectives of this course and subsequent methods courses, it is expected that all participants be able to demonstrate proficiency in English and a second language before enrolling.

MOL 354 | THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS/CURRENT RESEARCH SECOND/FOREIGN LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course serves both as undergraduate and graduate-level introduction to the field of second language acquisition (SLA) research. As such, it will introduce students to the research methods, findings, and some of the theoretical discussions that have encompassed the last three decades of SLA research. The focus is on basic questions regarding the process of language learning, rather than on explicitly pedagogical issues. The most important goal of SLA research is to uncover and describe the processes that are potentially affected by instructional efforts. Thus, one of the goals of the course is to have students reflect and, if necessary, modify how they view the role of an instructor and a learner of a second language. The material can be used to inform learning a second language as much as it is instrumental in teaching a second language. The material in this course should encourage students to question assumptions and begin to formulate individual ideas about what goes on in classrooms, how students learn, and how this learning could inform teaching of a second language. A final goal is to introduce students to critical reading of research articles in the field, as a preparation for possible further study of SLA.

MOL 355 | CONTEMPORARY CRITICISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An overview of contemporary criticism from Russian formalism to post-modernism. Cross-listed as CPL 355.

MOL 356 | PSYCHOLINGUISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An overview of basic issues in experimental psycholinguistics by introducing various topics, such as speech perception/production, word recognition/memory, sentence processing, first- and second-language acquisition and the brain and languages. Cross-listed as PSY 393.

MOL 357 | TEACHING CULTURE IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Pedagogical theory and practice in the integration of culture into the language classroom.

MOL 360 | REALISM IN RUSSIAN DRAMA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course presents some of the greatest Russian plays of the 18th and 19th century. In the course, students will read original works in English translation by Von Vizin, Griboedov, Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, and Ostrovsky. Some critical works will be included. Students will read, analyze, and interpret the plays, comedies and dramas, both with respect to form and meaning.

MOL 361 | MODERN RUSSIAN DRAMA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Russian theater represents a high point of Russian cultural and literary production. In this course students will explore Russian plays by a selection of the most important authors. Readings may include Chekhov, Gorky, Bulgakov, Teffi and others. Some critical works will be included. The student will read, analyze and interpret the plays, comedies and dramas, both with respect to form and meaning. In the process they will develop greater insight into the social and multicultural issues of the time period in which the plays were written.

MOL 364 | MODERN RUSSIAN AUTHORS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores works of the most influential Russian authors of the Modern period. Authors might include Anton Chekhov, Vladimir Nabokov, Mikhail Bulgakov, Evgeny Zamyatin, and more. Students will explore several genres, including poetry, novel, short, story, and plays. These authors and works will be studied in the context of their times.

MOL 369 | RUSSIAN LITERATURE AND FILM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Greatest Russian short stories, plays, and novels of the 19-20th century, as presented in film. Readings in English translation may include works by Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Ostrovsky, Chekhov, and Pasternak.

MOL 380 | COMMUNITY BASED SERVICE LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics in theory and practice of service learning.

MOL 389 | TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current offering. Cross-listed as ENG 389.

MOL 392 | INTERNSHIPS | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 396 | CAPSTONE: LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course addresses broad issues of human language that touch upon the concerns of all language majors. Topics include subjects such as: Languages as endangered species; The physiological/psychological benefits of bilingualism; and Oral language cultures. Topics are approached from a very broad perspective, namely linguistic, anthropological, literary and historical.

MOL 397 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN LANGUAGES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

MOL 398 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 400 | PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM | 1-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Supervised experience in teaching, tutoring, interpreting, editing writing or other professional exercise of language skills.

MOL 401 | PROFESSIONAL FOUNDATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course students will prepare a series of surveys/summaries of research literature and learning resources. They will identify one or more professional organizations such as MLA, CLA, ACTFL, CTFL, AATX, and others. Using their by-laws, publications, and recent conference programs, students will write a literature summary that identifies the major issues of concern to these organizations, and analyze their resources and professional standards related to research and practice in the students' field of interest. Required for Modern Language MA students.

MOL 402 | LANGUAGE, SELF AND SOCIETY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course offers students a theoretical and methodological introduction to the theory and methods of the study of language variation and change and its relationship to various social and individual factors (e.g. race, class, sex, ethnicity, identity, etc.). It introduces students to the concepts, theories, and methods used to analyze language and its role in the definition and construction of individual and group identity. Students will look specifically at how social and individual factors may influence linguistic structure and vice versa. The course will explore various theories of sociolinguistics, including the interaction between language and speakers' membership in various groups, linguistic variation across groups, intergroup theory, dialectology, and discourse analysis, among others. Through the course readings students will consider and critically analyze the notions of the speech community and the individual, the existence (or not) of dialects, synchronic variation and diachronic change, the relationship between social factors and language, language policy and planning, language standardization, linguistic ethnography, and theories related to education and society. Bilingual phenomena such as code switching, language contact, and the creation of pidgins and creoles will also be examined. Topics may vary by quarter. This course is required for language MA students.

MOL 403 | COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students will study Western and non-Western cultural texts that address a central theme (for example: "Citizenship," "Freedom and Oppression," "Globalization," "Popular pedagogy"). Students will practice talking and writing about the ethical questions, inter-cultural conversations, and analytical methods common to the liberal arts tradition as they apply to their use of a language in a particular professional setting. Students explore the varied kinds of local and global communities in the contemporary world and place them in political, economic, and historic contexts to understand how they have transformed over time, with specific attention to the interaction of economic (i.e., work practice) and social ties (i.e., familial, religious, ethnic, linguistic) in forming and transforming local, national, international and global communities. The course will examine how various ethnic groups have used communities as a starting place to assimilate and make their adjustments to nations as well as maintain ties to the culture and heritage of their home country. Topics vary by quarter and some sections will include service learning opportunities. This course is required for language MA students.

MOL 410 | JAPANESE CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Japanese Culture is a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary exploration of Japanese culture, especially as regards cultural figures such as "geisha," "samurai," and "Hello Kitty." These figures intersect with various critical discourses on gender, sexuality, nationalism, exoticism, orientalism, modernity, tradition, art, and aesthetics. They have also generated both praise and criticism. These questions are not only specific to the cultural figures as listed above but also run deep in society. The course will also examine other the historical and ideological constructions in Japan and the West, especially in the United States.

MOL 440 | ARAB CULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is the first in a series of three hybrid courses in the Arabic Studies Program that examine Arab culture. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of Arab culture and a clear understanding of its elements and historical events that shaped it. Emphasis will be placed on cultural aspects shared by all Arabs. The course will examine the general concept of culture, and study the elements that form Arab culture. It will also explore the impact of critical factors and events in Arab history from pre-Islamic to modern time on the evolvement of Arab culture as we know it today. Students will gain insight into the way Arabs think by examining Arabs' cultural practices, products, and perspectives. In addition to learning about Arabs and Arab culture, students will practice using technology to research, blog, discuss, and contribute to open-sources on topics related to Arab culture. Students will also have the opportunity to meet and interact with Arabs and the Chicago Arab heritage community.

MOL 441 | MEDIA IN THE ARAB WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is one of a series of three culture/media/and literature courses strongly recommended for a major in Arabic Studies. It is also an elective course that can be taken by students at large. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the Arab media--including newspapers, television, and the Internet--as a product of Arab culture. Students will examine Arab media to gain better understanding of its nature, role, content, and influence within emphasis on the context of Arab societies and the factors influencing their people such as politics, religion, technology, and Western influence. In addition to the assigned readings from the textbook and a variety of sources that represent various perspectives, a sample of products of Arab media including newspapers, TV programs, news, cartoons, and blogs will be examined to better understand Arab media. Furthermore, elements and factors that impact Arab media will be analyzed and discussed. The impact of the West on Arab media, and the future of Arab media will also be discussed.

MOL 442 | MODERN ARABIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is one of a series of three courses offered by the Arabic Studies program as part of the major and minor in Arabic Studies. It provides a survey of modern Arabic literature and focuses on various genre including poetry, plays, short stories, and novels. Work by major Arab writers and poets representing various regions and content related to Arab culture are examined and analyzed to develop an appreciation for Arabic literature and deeper understanding of Arab culture as portrayed in the major works of modern Arab poets and authors. This is a hybrid course. Students meet onsite one day a week for 2 hours and conduct work online to satisfy the course requirements. Specific assignments are provided each week through D2L and Ning social network for the online portion of the course.

MOL 449 | TEACHING MODERN LANGUAGES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The Teaching Modern Language course is specially designed for the teacher who is about to begin his/her career teaching foreign languages at the K-12 levels. This course is also designed for accomplished and experienced teachers who wish to receive new information on current theory and practice. The course has as an overall objective to provide learners with the theoretical and practical tools that will enable them to become critical and reflective foreign language practitioners.

MOL 450 | METHODS OF TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Provides training in the theory and methods of teaching foreign languages in the elementary school (FLES). Designed for both pre-service and in-service teachers. Pre-service teachers include foreign language majors interested in elementary school teaching and elementary majors who are proficient in a foreign language and interested in teaching FLES. In-service teachers include elementary teachers proficient in a foreign language who are teaching or who are interested in teaching FLES and secondary trained teachers who are teaching or who are interested in teaching FLES. In order to meet the objectives of this course and subsequent methods courses, it is expected that all participants be able to demonstrate proficiency in English and a second language before enrolling.

MOL 454 | THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS/CURRENT RESEARCH SECOND/FOREIGN LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course serves both as undergraduate and graduate-level introduction to the field of second language acquisition (SLA) research. As such, it will introduce students to the research methods, findings, and some of the theoretical discussions that have encompassed the last three decades of SLA research. The focus is on basic questions regarding the process of language learning, rather than on explicitly pedagogical issues. The most important goal of SLA research is to uncover and describe the processes that are potentially affected by instructional efforts. Thus, one of the goals of the course is to have students reflect and, if necessary, modify how they view the role of an instructor and a learner of a second language. The material can be used to inform learning a second language as much as it is instrumental in teaching a second language. The material in this course should encourage students to question assumptions and begin to formulate individual ideas about what goes on in classrooms, how we learn, and how this learning could inform our teaching of second language. A final goal is to introduce students to critical reading of research articles in the field, as a preparation for possible further study of SLA.

MOL 457 | TEACHING CULTURE IN THE MODERN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Pedagogical theory and practice in the integration of culture into the language classroom.

MOL 460 | RUSSIAN DRAMA IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course presents some of the greatest Russian plays of the 18th and 19th century. In the course, students will read original works in English translation by Von Vizin, Griboedov, Pushkin, Gogal, Lermontov, and Ostrovsky. Some critical works will be included. Students will read, analyze, and interpret the plays, comedies and dramas, both with respect to form and meaning.

MOL 461 | RUSSIAN DRAMA IN TRANSLATION II: SOVIET ERA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Russian theater of the 20th century appeared in parallel to realistic novels and contributed to the movement of realism in Russian literature. Russian theater of the 20th century, presented by such authors as Chekhov, Gorky, Bulgakov and Teffi, demonstrates tendencies from realism to avant-garde. Some critical works will be included. The student will read, analyze and interpret the plays, comedies and dramas, both with respect to form and meaning. In the process they will develop greater insight into the social and multicultural issues of the time.

MOL 464 | RUSSIAN SHORT STORY IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION II: SOVIET ERA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course presents some of the greatest Russian short stories (1880 - 1930) in English translation. Students will read short stories in English translation by major Russian writers such as Chekhov, Kuprin, Bunin and Bulgakov. Students will analyze and interpret short stories of the 1880-1930 period, both with respect to form and meaning, and discuss some critical works.

MOL 468 | RUSSIAN NOVEL IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION III: CONTEMPORARY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Major Russian prose works of the late 20th century, read in English translation. Authors include Bulgakov, Platonov, Pristavkin, and Bitov.

MOL 496 | MAMOL CAPSTONE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

As the required capstone course for the M.A. program in Modern Languages, MOL 496 requires students to reflect on their coursework and the materials that they have produced for their portfolios in order to articulate a coherent vision of their experience in the program. It encourages them to learn from each other's professional interests, builds community among them, and facilitates interactive learning. The course employs a seminar design that is intentionally flexible, and varies depending upon the participating students' goals and objectives. Class sessions will focus on the common issues and concerns that all students face as "language professionals." In addition, each student must select a representative work (the portfolio project), create an overview and commentary text on this work, and present the work to the class. Each student's portfolio and project (whether a thesis, internship, or creative work) will reflect his or her own intellectual interests and professional goals.

MOL 497 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN LANGUAGES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

MOL 498 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 499 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 4-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable credit.

MOL 510 | CANDIDACY CONTINUATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This 0-credit hour course is available to master's degree candidates who are actively working toward the completion of a thesis, project, or portfolio. Enrollment in this course is limited to three quarters and requires thesis/project advisor and graduate director approval and demonstration to them of work each quarter. Enrollment in this course allows access to the library and other campus facilities. This course carries and requires the equivalent of half-time enrollment status. The student may be eligible for loan deferment and student loans. This course is graded as pass/fail. (0 credit hours)

MOL 511 | CANDIDACY MAINTENANCE | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This 0-credit hour course is available to graduate students who are not registered for a course in a given quarter but need to maintain active university status. Enrollment in this course is limited to three quarters and requires permission of the graduate director. Enrollment in this course allows access to the library and other campus facilities. This course does not carry an equivalent enrollment status and students in it are not eligible for loan deferment or student loans. This course is not graded. (0 credit hours)