Public Policy Studies (PPS)

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PPS 200 | INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This core course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the field of public policy. The historical origins of policy analysis, definitions of what constitutes "public policy", various theoretical approaches developed to address policy problems, and contemporary policy debates on various substantive issues. By the end of the course each student has a solid background for further study of public policy and the social sciences. This course should be taken as one of the first courses in the major.

PPS 201 | PUBLIC POLICY AND URBAN ISSUES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This core course is designed to introduce students to the study of urban areas, to some of the more exciting and difficult issues faced by cities, and finally, to some of the policies designed to address these issues. Readings assist students in exploring what makes cities function, how they have changed over time and what it was like to live through those changes, can show us how modern ways of seeing and modern ways of making sense came into being. If student is a PPS major, then students are encouraged to take PPS 200 prior to PPS 201.

PPS 202 | PUBLIC POLICY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This core course reviews the environmental public policy issues in the United States. The history of the modern environmental movement and the impact it continues to have on public policy is explored. Students apply concepts of environmental policy and move towards proposing policy solutions. There is no prerequisite for this course.

PPS 205 | PUBLIC POLICY RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This core course provides students a foundation of and some experience with the research methods used in public policy for collecting and conducting public policy analysis. This will include an overview of research designs and the variety of methods for conducting public policy analysis. Concepts of reliability and validity as well as the use of social scientific policy studies are used. The social science approach to conducting research on public policy is the focus.

PPS 206 | QUANTITATIVE PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on writing of research questions and hypotheses, selection of appropriate quantitative statistical analyses for research questions, interpretation of statistical results, and communication of those results. A significant portion of the course work will involve doing statistical analyses of existing data using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Students will prepare a substantial paper using the techniques for public policy analysis. Students majoring in PPS are encouraged to have completed PPS 205 before taking this course. This core course for PPS majors and minors should be taken before the senior year.

PPS 250 | ISSUES IN NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A major focus of urban policy and grassroots action is the condition of city neighborhoods. This course examines trends in urban policy as they have affected neighborhoods, neighborhood-grounded grassroots action, and local neighborhood development initiatives.

PPS 251 | URBAN POVERTY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the demographics of poverty and its concentration in central cities. In addition, definitions of poverty and public policies aimed at alleviating poverty are explored with the aim of understanding why poverty remains prevalent in the United States.

PPS 253 | THE CINEMATIC CITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the relationship between the city and cinema and explores how the city both real and ideal is represented in film. Covering a diverse selection of films, genres, and historical periods, the course critically explores the relationship between urban forms and cinematic representations.

PPS 254 | SCREENING SUBURBIA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course explores how suburbia was represented in cinema since the post-war period. Covering diverse selection of films and genre, the course examines how domesticity, family life, gender roles, race, suburbanization, domestic space and architecture have been in cinematic space. Drawing on historical and contemporary sources, the course places suburbia at the center stage and examines the relationship between cinema and suburban ideals and how cinema as a particular mode of representation has sought to address suburbia as a particular American social and cultural landscape.

PPS 255 | CITIES, GLOBALIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will examine the process of globalization on cities and its policy implication. In particular, the course will explore how the impact of globalization on cities may be evaluated; what benefits or problems they produce and for whom. It will conclude by looking at how public policy professionals can influence these results.

PPS 260 | CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course looks at the public policy responses to climate change in a variety of contexts. Beginning with a discussion of the unique, global nature of the problem, the course looks at how international, national, and subnational governments have developed policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions as well as ways to build resilience in the face of changing climatic conditions. Special attention will be placed on the role of uncertainty and risk management in the policy making process with regard to climate adaptation. There is no prerequisite for this course.

PPS 300 | APPLIED URBAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this core course is to provide students with a foundation in microeconomic analytical tools through which to analyze urban and environmental policy issues. This course is intended to be participatory and applied. A variety of public policy issues are examined in terms of microeconomic theory and application.

PPS 301 | PUBLIC POLICY AND THE POLITICAL PROCESS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Policy decisions almost inevitably involve politics. This core course explores the politics of the urban political machines that dominated politics in many cities for a long time, though some might argue that they actually had few policy interests other than to remain in power. The course examines how power is distributed in cities, and how it is used to get at the various problems confronting cities. That is, how politics affects policy. The course studies the players in the game of policy formation, and the policy process itself. While the focus may be on cities, make no mistake, politics impacts environmental policy decisions and the process of making those decisions as well.

PPS 330 | SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Sustainable development has become a crucial concept in international initiatives worldwide. It attempts to foster policies that balance the need for economic development with practices that promote healthy communities and ecosystems. This course is based on the instructor's theoretical and practical experience gathered in developed and developing countries under market and command economies conditions. Special emphasis is placed on the role of institutions, both governmental and non-government, in shaping economic policies that are compatible with environmental health. The course pursues the objective of preparing students to understand main environmental problems and to generate solutions for these problems from a multidisciplinary perspective.

PPS 331 | ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a historical background on environmental justice (EJ) in the US and an understanding of the current EJ movement. Policy debates surrounding EJ are highlighted from recent studies on determining 'disproportionate impact' to local EJ communities. In addition, students will experience the challenges of EJ organizations in Chicago through the service-based leaning component of the course. Twenty-five hours of service learning is required for completion of this course.

PPS 332 | NATIONAL PARKS POLICY AND GOVERNANCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the interrelationship between public policy, human values, and nature as displayed through environmental policy governing our national parks. Special attention is given to the cultural dynamics (including political and legal) that are demonstrated in how public policies have been created and implemented over time in regards to our national parks. The course reviews the policy literature and theories associated with the management of the national parks as it reflects our societal values of the time period. These policies have dramatically changed over time, so it is an ideal venue that demonstrates a significant change in how we view nature. The role of tourism, economic development pressures and property owners (takings) concerns will be included. Also, critical thinking about national parks policy will be required. This is taught as a hybrid course.

PPS 333 | GREEN CITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course looks at public policies pertaining to urban sustainability. Low-carbon transportation, green building policies, locally produced renewable energy, and storm water management policies are among the topics discussed.

PPS 334 | SUSTAINABLE LAND REVITALIZATION AND BROWNFIELDS DEVELOPMENT POLICY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is focused on environmental public policy issues associated with Brownfields, Superfund sites, and an assortment of state and local land revitalization programs. Substantive emphasis includes examination of social problems and public policy impediments associated with the revitalization of neighborhoods. This course includes current public policy regulations and implementation guidelines to prepare students for working in this field.

PPS 350 | ISSUES IN URBAN REDEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course examines the central issues in contemporary urban development: how urban restructuring, demographic shifts, new patterns of production and consumption, as well as technologically-grounded globalization processes, shape urban development. The course emphasizes the changing context of urban development policy and explores various critical approaches to interpreting urban development policy.

PPS 351 | THE POLICY AND POLITICS OF URBAN HOUSING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course looks at housing as a social symbol and material commodity, with particular emphasis placed on the role of government in the direct provision of housing and the indirect support of home ownership, as well as housing policies indirect impact on neighborhood development, race relations, and metropolitan suburbanization.

PPS 352 | ISSUES IN URBAN EDUCATIONAL POLICY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines the politics, history, and social context of urban education. Special attention is devoted to emerging policy alternatives such as the use of school vouchers and the formation of charter schools.

PPS 353 | INEQUALITY AND PUBLIC POLICY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Many recent studies have detailed the significant growth in economic inequality in the United States, showing a level not seen since the 1920s. Others have focused on the consequences on significant inequality for a society and its politics. Often this inequality is seen as a necessary (and even desirable) consequence of a free market. This course focuses, however, on policy aspects of our current inequality: the public policies that have contributed to current levels of inequality, reasons for reducing inequality, and public policies that may reduce inequality. U.S. inequality and public policies will also be contrasted with those of similar nations, such as Germany and Nordic countries.

PPS 359 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC POLICY STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an in-depth examination of various public policy issues and be taken multiple times for each topic offered.

PPS 360 | GREAT LAKES GOVERNANCE POLICY AND MANAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Great Lakes of the United States are a significant natural resource. This course will give an overview of the discovery, history, and policy development associated with the management and governance of the lakes. Students will research the different organizations involved with public policy of the lakes, as well as learn the legal framework in how they interact. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the lakes.

PPS 361 | PUBLIC SPACES AND SOCIAL CONTROL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Several contemporary trends have led city governments to emphasize policies to attract middle class residents, tourists, and conventions back to the city. These policies often include means of increasing social control over public spaces so that these users feel safe. Also, given fiscal constraints, many local governments see privatization of some public spaces, including neighborhoods, as a means of stretching limited dollars while providing needed services. Many commentators and scholars, however, are greatly concerned about the resulting changes in public spaces of urban areas. They write about Disneyfication of urban areas, commodification of culture, the city as spectacle or theme park, the city as fortress or panopticon, the restrictions of certain behaviors and publics in urban areas---in other words, the loss of public space. These issues and policies raise questions about the differences between public and private spaces, the role of public spaces in democratic governance, the definition/identification of "the public" and citizens, the use of private governments for social control, police strategies for social control, and the equity of social control efforts in and current use patterns of public spaces. Those issues are the focus of the course.

PPS 393 | CAPSTONE: GENTRIFICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to bring together much of the knowledge attained by Public Policy students during their four years at DePaul by focusing on the often contentious issues of urban gentrification and re-gentrification. Gentrification involves economic issues, political issues, environmental issues, educational issues, race and ethnicity, and equity issues as well. The course shall examine the variables associated with the process of gentrification, the advantages and disadvantages of that process, the winners and the losers in the process, and the political and economic implications of all of this.

Status as a Public Policy Studies major with Senior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

PPS 394 | CAPSTONE: GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to integrate the two concentrations of the Public Policy major to address sustainable management of essential urban infrastructure systems, including stormwater management, energy production and efficiency, and urban forests. The course shall examine how municipal green infrastructure investment reflects larger social values and encourages students to examine the social forces that impact the efficacy of green infrastructure.

Status as a Public Policy Studies major with Senior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

PPS 397 | TRAVEL/STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Travel/Study.

PPS 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 4-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Independent Study.