Environmental Science (ENV)

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ENV 101 | INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE WITHOUT LAB | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

ENV 101 provides an overview of how the natural world works, how we interact with it and how we can work to protect, restore and sustain it for the future. Topics include an overview of basic ecological principles, population, biodiversity, energy, natural resources and pollution. The course emphasis is on the science behind current environmental concerns. Social, ethical, economic, and political perspectives are considered in order to provide perspective and a fuller understanding of the issues and their solutions. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 101 and ENV 102.

ENV 102 | INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE WITH LAB | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

ENV 102 provides an overview of how the natural world works, how we interact with it and how we can work to protect, restore and sustain it for the future. Topics include an overview of basic ecological principles, population, biodiversity, energy, natural resources and pollution. The course emphasis is on the science behind current environmental concerns. Social, ethical, economic, and political perspectives are considered in order to provide perspective and a fuller understanding of the issues and their solutions. Lab investigations further develop scientific and environmental understandings. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 101 and ENV 102.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 115 | ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of the earth's materials and structures, and the processes responsible for their formation; how geologic processes and hazards influence human activities (and vice versa); and a discussion of geologic resources and the geological aspects of waste disposal and pollution. The course includes a three-hour lab. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 115 and ENV 116.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 116 | GEOLOGY OF THE ENVIRONMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of the earth's materials and structures, and the processes responsible for their formation; how geologic processes and hazards influence human activities (and vice versa); and a discussion of geologic resources and the geological aspects of waste disposal and pollution. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 115 and ENV 116.

ENV 117 | EARTH THROUGH TIME WITH LABORATORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A general introduction to the 4.6 billion-year geologic history of planet Earth. The course scientifically explores the history of the earth from its formation to present day, the origin and transformation of rocks, internal and external geologic processes and structures, evolution and extinction of organisms, and patterns of Earth's environmental conditions through time. The course includes a three-hour lab.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 118 | EARTH THROUGH TIME | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A general introduction to the 4.6 billion-year geologic history of planet Earth. The course scientifically explores the history of the earth from its formation to present day, the origin and transformation of rocks, internal and external geologic processes and structures, evolution and extinction of organisms, and patterns of Earth's environmental conditions through time.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this course.

ENV 150 | FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to environmental studies. It presents students with an overview of the intersections between ecology, the social sciences, and the humanities that inform our vision of the rigor and power of interdisciplinary environmental studies. It draws upon the natural sciences, communication, geography, philosophy, religion, history, literature, art and design, and public policy to stress the interrelationships between human society and the natural world. Students will study the effects of the human use of the natural world and the interactions of culture, society, resources, and the environment. We will examine the social, political, and economic institutions that impact the environment. Particular attention will be paid to how the role of power and inequality contribute to environmental problems and how those problems in turn, impact certain groups more than others (e.g. citizens of undeveloped nations, people of color in urban areas).

ENV 151 | INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to sustainability and examines the essential interdependence between environmental, human, and economic systems. The class focuses on the theories and practices that respect the Earth's ecological limits so that these systems remain viable now and into the future. Students will explore the interrelated environmental, social, and economic problems that we currently face at the local, national, and global scale and the solutions that individuals, governments, and institutions are implementing in an effort to ensure a sustainable future.

ENV 152 | ECOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL ECONOMICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students examine the role of the environment and natural resources in neoclassical, environmental and ecological economics. First, students study mechanisms for efficiently allocating scarce resources among specific alternative ends and take a brief foray into environmental economics and learn methods of resource/environmental valuation. We also discuss aspects of macroeconomics as it pertains to ecological economics. Students come away able to critically assess the benefits and drawbacks of these three ways that the economy incorporates the environment. It also encourages ethical reasoning as we discuss distribution of environmental benefits over generations and globally.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 160 | IDEAS OF NATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introductory history of the ideas of nature that emerged over the last two and a half centuries in Europe and the United States. We examine how the conceptions, meanings, and values of nature today have been influenced by the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, Romanticism, and evolutionary theory; notions of the sublime, the frontier, and wilderness; and the practices of conservation, preservation, and restoration. Also discussed are the ideological commitments of current environmentalisms, in particular sustainability.

ENV 165 | NATIONAL PARKS HISTORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed, in part, as intensive introduction to the history of national parks, both in the United States and abroad, and will cover a broad swath of history, from the historical antecedents that influenced the founding of the America's earliest parks to twenty-first century issues throughout the world. By necessity, this will not be an exhaustive survey of the history of all fifty-nine national parks in the United States, let alone the roughly 7,000 national parks worldwide. Instead, we will use illustrative examples to highlight key moments in national park history, including nineteenth-century intellectual movements that inspired the creation of national parks, the debates over conservation and preservation, legislative acts such as the Antiquities Act and the National Park Service Organic Act, the democratization of tourism in America, the rise of the wilderness and environmental movements, the conservative revolution, the exportation of the national park ideal throughout the burgeoning world, and the future of American national parks. The historical knowledge gained through course readings and lectures will be essential for completion of both writing assignments and the two exams.

ENV 170 | ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The environmental issues that confront us are both global and local; they involve political, economic and ethical decision-making by governments, corporations and citizens. Students will explore and evaluate diverse approaches to a range of such issues, as well as the ways different thinkers and different cultures have envisioned the relationship between human beings and the natural world-all with a view to understanding their own relationships to the natural world, their own environmental ethics.

ENV 180 | ISSUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Issues in Environmental Design is an introductory course that will examine concepts, theories and practices across multiple scales of design, including architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. Students will discuss and evaluate the design decisions that compose our built environment with a focus on contemporary ideas of ecological sustainability. Examples of excellence will be explored through the examination of case studies. The underlying theme is the connection between culture and nature, and how we may reduce our negative impact on systems that support all life while building positive systems that support all life.

ENV 181 | LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the process by which landscape architects contribute to the built environment. The course will culminate in the presentation of a student design proposal for an existing site in Chicago. In preparation, students will use literature and design examples to examine how political and aesthetic attitudes toward landscape architecture have evolved, from the pastoral focus of the 19th century to today?s desire for adaptable and multifunctional spaces. Selection of readings and examples will be catered to key issues arising from the chosen design proposal site for that quarter. Students will become familiar with standard architectural representation methods (such as plan, section and model) and will learn how landscape architects engage with existing social and environmental conditions in the development of their aesthetic designs.

ENV 200 | CITIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the interactions between urban areas and the environment. It presents a discussion of the physical setting of cities; the water, energy, air and waste disposal needs of urban areas; and the effects of urban development on air, soil, and water quality, and the health of the community of non-human organisms. In particular, it presents this topic in the context of the emerging discipline of urban ecology, and introduces the notion of cities as social ecological systems where both people and nature interact.

ENV 202 | RESOURCES, POPULATION, AND THE ENVIRONMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A course on the relationship between the exploitation of the biological, mineral and energy resources of the earth to support an increasing population, and the environmental effects of this development. To provide an overview of the current debate on the relationship between the growing human population worldwide, the natural resources required to sustain this population, and the consequences of resource exploitation for managing environmental quality. We will integrate the ecological, economic, and policy factors involved in natural resource management.

ENV 203 | CHEMISTRY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

ENV 203 is a course for Environmental Studies majors that develops the fundamental concepts of chemistry with experimental exploration in the context of societal issues. Chemistry topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and acid-base behavior. These topics are discussed on a "need-to-know" basis, embedded in discussions of air pollution, ozone depletion, global climate change, energy, water pollution, and acid rain.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 204 | ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to provide students with the scientific tools necessary to understand and critically evaluate both personal and policy decisions regarding the variety of options (e.g. fossil fuel, solar, wind, etc.) for energy generation and use. The course also focuses on the environmental impacts of all forms of energy, from the extraction of fossil fuels and mineral resources from the earth, to the generation, distribution and consumption of energy, and ultimately emission of fossil fuel combustion products, notably carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses, to the atmosphere.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 205 | BIOLOGY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This lecture-laboratory course for Environmental Studies majors introduces the fundamental concepts of biology that are critical for the understanding of a wide range of environmental issues, such as genetic engineering, overpopulation, conservation biology, and climate change. Under the framework of evolutionary biology, the content of this course includes basic cell biology, genetics, population biology, phylogeny, ontogeny, and biodiversity.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 216 | EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on three of the great spheres of the Earth (lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere) and how they interact with the biosphere to create an integrated Earth system with an emphasis on how human activities impact important earth system cycles. Students should have a basic understanding of how living organisms interact with their physical environment. Laboratory activities provide experience with the tools and methodology of systems thinking.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 217 | HUMAN IMPACTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A science-based course that examines the interface between humans and the living and non-living environment, the consequences of these interactions, and options for mitigating environmental impacts.

ENV 222 | TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics in environmental studies.

ENV 230 | GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Climate change is a crucial issue facing society and involves intricate interactions between human pollution, processes in the Earth system and societal impacts. The course will cover the basic science of climate change and also consider its ethical dimensions. Solutions to climate change that incorporate sound science and social behavior will be explored through student-driven projects.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 235 | ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course, led by educators from the Chicago Academy of Sciences and its Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (PNNM), examines theories and models of environmental education (EE) and the status of environmental literacy in the US. The goal is to equip you, as future environmental professionals, to effectively engage audiences in environmental topics and issues. In this experiential learning course, you will participate in and observe aspects of program implementation, development, and evaluation at PNNM. These experiences serve as an additional "text" for you to reflect on and connect with course content, and ultimately utilize in your future career paths. As a result of this course, you will be able to: 1. Articulate trends in environmental education theory and practice across a range of educational settings 2. Connect course content (readings, lectures, and discussion) to firsthand experiences with PNNM program development, implementation, and evaluation 3. Apply EE best practices in the development of an educational experience for audiences and topics aligned with PNNM.

ENV 240 | INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces the principles and core practices involved in the culture of plants. Topics include the uses of plants and horticultural practices throughout history; the botanical and horticultural classification of plants; plant structure and function, growth and regulation; environmental requirements for plant growth; genetic modification of plants; plant reproduction and propagation; and plant pests and diseases. The course also considers environmental issues in horticulture including xeriscaping, biodiversity and the use of native plants, water management and rain gardens and hydroponics and container gardens.

ENV 245 | URBAN AND COMMUNITY AGRICULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will acquaint students with the challenges, opportunities, practices, and transformative potential of urban agriculture. Taking an interdisciplinary, case-study approach, this course will explore issues such as food security, community gardening, farmers markets, the locavore food movement, entrepreneurial aspects of urban agriculture, methods of urban food production, and food consumption patterns. The course will meet in the classroom and on-site at the DePaul urban farm and greenhouses. In addition, students are expected to spend several hours each week outside of class time engaged in hands-on experience in urban farming at DePaul or at local sites arranged with the instructor.

ENV 250 | APPLIED ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides a broad survey of ecological principles and methods of lab and field investigation. Topics include the distribution and abundance of organisms in nature including those factors that influence population size, growth, and regulation; species interactions; community organization and change; and ecosystem level processes that move matter and energy among the living and non-living parts of the environment. The lecture also integrates ecological theory with natural history and environmental issues. Lab goals are to help students 1) acquire experience in ecological methods and sampling techniques, 2) better understand ecological concepts, 3) develop skills in hypothesis testing, experimental design, and the analysis of ecological data and 4) gain an increased awareness of and appreciation for the complexity, diversity, and structure of the natural world.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 260 | ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide students with skills to implement the most common statistical methods used in the environmental sciences. It emphasizes statistical literacy and develops statistical thinking, examines real data to address authentic questions, and fosters active learning by experiencing statistics; student design studies, collect data, analyze data using graphs and numerical tools, interpret results, communicate statistical inferences with written and oral reports.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 261 | MIXED METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Environmental studies as a discipline is increasingly interdisciplinary and requires knowledge and skills in not only the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities, but also quantitative and qualitative analytical methods. In this class, students will learn how to effectively blend different theories and methodologies to examine interactions between humans and the environment. Skills gained will include survey design and implementation, qualitative interviewing and analysis, photo interpretation, case study, ethical considerations in environmentally-focused human subjects research, and more.

ENV 250 & LSP 120 are prerequisites for this class.

ENV 294 | SECOND YEAR SEMINAR | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to advance ecological literacy. The seminar presents the study of the environment to students in a philosophical, cultural, and historical context, and in addition makes them aware of some foundational ideas of the discipline through a selection of new and classic literature. (2 quarter hours)

ENV 300 | PLANT IDENTIFICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An in-depth overview of plant families and species in the Chicagoland area. Lectures will focus on morphology of plants, evolutionary relationships among plant families, and terminology of plant structures. Students will use botanical keys and manuals for the area to identify plants and will learn collection techniques. Plant species will be collected in their natural habitats during field trips.

ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 305 | ANIMAL DIVERSITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course investigates the diversity of animals, including invertebrates and vertebrates. Discussions include the origin and evolution of animals, species concepts, developmental biology, taxonomic classification, phylogenetic systematics, and conservation biology.

ENV 205 (or BIO 192) is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 310 | ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An examination of the physical, chemical, biological and engineering properties of soils, their genesis and classification, how they function as sites of waste disposal, and their role in global agricultural production. The course includes a three-hour lab and a mandatory Saturday field trip.

LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 315 | PLANT ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on how plants are affected by abiotic factors in the environment and interactions with other organisms. Goals are to improve students' abilities to understand research papers, present overviews of current research, design experiments, and analyze data. The course includes weekly labs with greenhouse experiments or field trips followed by data analysis. Topics include germination ecology, pollination biology, competition between plants, and effects of herbivory.

ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 316 | CHEMISTRY OF EARTH SYSTEMS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This class focuses on the impact of pollution on the Earth's ability to provide clean air, water and food for human consumption. The industrialization of the economy during the last 150 years has greatly increased the amount of waste that is sent into the four Earth spheres: the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. These emissions directly harm organisms and also cycle back to pollute essential ecosystem services provided by the Earth. This class will consider the source, transport, transformation and ultimate fate of pollution emitted into the air, water and solid Earth. Examples will include relatively simple cases (agricultural pesticides harming birds) and range to more complex interactions (depletion of stratospheric ozone by CFCs and the increase in harmful ultraviolet radiation). The laboratory component will be project-based and some work can be completed outside of the assigned lab time.

ENV 216 and CHE 132 are a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 320 | CONSERVATION BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary field that has developed in response to the challenge of preserving species and ecosystems. With a specific focus on the Chicago area, students in this course will: assess key threats to biodiversity and the challenges associated with conservation of native communities, evaluate how different institutions implement conservation in the region, and engage with the primary literature related to the field of conservation biology.

BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 322 | ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to the conceptual and methodological tools of ecosystem ecology. The course will focus on understanding the fundamental structure and function of ecosystems but will also address very recent debates on the economic value of ecosystem services, the role of biological diversity in maintaining ecosystem processes, and the consequences of stressed and degraded ecosystems for human welfare. Finally, we assess the role of ecosystem ecology in designing sustainable restoration projects. The course includes a weekly lab.

BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 331 | URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

As the world's population shifts into cities, there is an increasing interest in measuring the quality of the urban environment. From air quality to soundscapes, urban dwellers want to live in an environment that is healthy and sustainable. However, deteriorated environmental conditions are widespread and often unfairly distributed with regards to race, ethnicity and class. Assuming that knowledge is power, person-centered environmental monitoring can identify hotspots, highlight injustices and lead to improvements. The class will focus on a new generation of wearable/deployable sensors that use cell phones and other technology advances to measure air, sound and visual quality. This project-driven class will have students personally investigating an urban environmental question using wearable sensors or easily deployable environmental monitors.

(LSP 120) or (LSP 121) or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisites for this class.

ENV 340 | URBAN ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Urban ecology has been described as an ?upstart discipline.? This is because it is relative new, and challenges the historical emphasis that scientific ecology has placed on pristine and wilderness locations. Thus, this novel discipline examines the way ecological ideas can increase our understanding of cities in ways that assist us in making cities more sustainable - cleaner, healthier and more biodiverse. We also examine how ecology as a discipline can be broadened by its encounter with disciplines that have historically paid more attention to the city: urban sociology, anthropology, geography, economics, demography, architecture and planning. In particular we develop the notion of the system as a ?social ecological system.? This course has a required lab; and some Saturday field trips.

BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 341 | URBAN FORESTS AS SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Urban forests include all the trees, forests, and greenspaces in cities and towns. Urban forest management, or urban forestry, is the discipline/profession that seeks to plan and manage this green infrastructure in order to provide ecological, economic, and social benefits to all residents. Trees and vegetation have long been protected and planted in cities and towns for a variety of reasons. Recently, urban forestry has expanded to be a lead focus in the broader arena of urban ecology and urban ecosystem management, with a clear goal of creating sustainable ecosystems. This course will look at urban forests through the lens of social-ecological systems (SESs) of linked human and natural components, with a focus on teaching students the hands-on skills of urban forest management. The course will utilize the talents of a number of guest speakers and field experience facilitators who are professionals in urban forestry to give students a practical, real world introduction to the subject. The DePaul University campus and the City of Chicago and surrounding region will serve as our field laboratory to view an actively managed urban forest. This course meets learning outcomes 1 and 4 for the Environmental Science and Studies majors, outcomes 5 through 8 for the Environmental Science major, outcome 6 in the Environmental Studies major, and outcome 9 for the sustainability concentration.

ENV 250 (or permission of instructor) is a prerequisite for this course.

ENV 344 | ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND ADVOCACY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the roles of individuals and organizations in advocacy through the lens of environmental justice, particularly as power arrangements facilitate or impede consensus building. The course examines how legislation is written and how this process has impacted communities of color. Special attention is paid to advocacy techniques such as lobbying, movement-building, public education and litigation.

ENV 345 | URBAN AGRICULTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will acquaint students with the challenges, opportunities, practices, and transformative potential of urban agriculture. Taking an interdisciplinary, integrative, case-study approach, this course will explore issues such as food access, food security, food deserts, community gardening, farmers markets, locavore food movement, entrepreneurial aspects of urban agriculture, method of food production, community nutrition, and food consumption patterns. The course will meet both in the classroom and on-site at an urban farm, where students will work in all aspects of the farm as well as learn to organize communities in an effort to help them create food security and access to healthy food systems.

ENV 350 | ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND STUDIES CAPSTONE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines basic core concepts of and current issues in environmental science drawing on perspectives of the liberal studies curriculum, including reflectiveness, value consciousness, critical and creative thinking, and a multicultural perspective.

Status as a senior Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 355 | INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Study of the environment factors that influence health. Topics include air and water pollution, global population and local community dynamics, toxicology, infectious and chemical agents, radiation, and management.

ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 359 | ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS WITH R | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Advanced topics in design and analysis of environmental experiments using the free data science software, R. Students will apply univariate and multivariate statistics to publicly available environmental data, interpret results, make appropriate inferences from data, and communicate findings in written and oral format.

ENV 260 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 360 | RESEARCH METHODS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is intended for junior year Environmental Science majors who are preparing for their senior thesis research projects. Topics include the nature and philosophy of science, experimental design, scientific ethics, and scientific writing. Students will prepare a thesis research proposal on a topic to be determined in the first week of the course.

Status as an Environmental Science major with junior standing or above is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 361 | RESEARCH IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

ENV 361 is for students who are currently working with an ENV faculty mentor on a research project. Restricted to students majoring in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies; permission of instructor required.

ENV 362 | SENIOR THESIS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

ENV 362 is designed for Environmental Science students working on their senior thesis. (2 quarter hours)

ENV 360 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 390 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable topics.

ENV 398 | TRAVEL/STUDY | 4-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Foreign and domestic study tours by special arrangement with sponsoring programs: Variable credit.

ENV 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit. Permission of instructor and chair required.

ENV 400 | PLANT IDENTIFICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

An in-depth overview of plant families and species in the Chicagoland area. Lectures will focus on morphology of plants, evolutionary relationships among plant families, and terminology of plant structures. Students will use botanical keys and manuals for the area to identify plants and will learn collection techniques. Plant species will be collected in their natural habitats during field trips. Recommended prerequisite is ENV 250 or BIO 215 or the equivalent.

ENV 401 | INTRODUCTION TO URBAN BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A fundamental reorientation in biodiversity conservation practice in the past generation concerns the recognition that the contemporary urban environment affords some exceptional opportunities for biodiversity conservation. Though many species avoid human dominated environments, there is now an acknowledgment that many species can tolerate or even thrive in metropolitan areas. Coyotes, and several species of raptors, for example, provide an illustration of this emerging diversity. Furthermore, the open space often set aside in cities afford opportunities for the rehabilitation of habitat in close proximity to people. This course will introduce the perspectives emerging from conservation biology, conservation planning, ecosystem management, restoration ecology, and reconciliation ecology that contribute to the thriving practice of urban biodiversity management.

ENV 402 | URBAN ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Urban ecology has been described as an "upstart discipline". This is because it is relatively new, and challenges the historical emphasis that scientific ecology has placed on pristine and wilderness locations. Thus, this novel discipline examines the way ecological ideas can increase our understanding of cities in ways that assist us in making cities more sustainable - cleaner, healthier and more biodiverse. We also examine how ecology as a discipline can be broadened by its encounter with disciplines that have historically paid more attention to the city: urban sociology, anthropology, geography, economics, demography, architecture and planning. In particular, we explore "social ecological system" analysis as a way of framing question concerning people and nature in metropolitan settings.

ENV 403 | ECOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS WITH R | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will provide students with the skills to implement the most common statistical methods used in the environmental sciences. It builds upon students' prior knowledge of statistical thinking, and addresses real data to address the sorts of questions students are likely to encounter in their professional lives. The course fosters active learning by experiencing statistics; student design studies, collect data, analyze data using appropriate software, and amplifies students' ability to interpret results, communicate statistical inferences with written and oral reports.

ENV 260 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 404 | APPLIED ECOLOGICAL MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

There is a productive tension in the environmental science between the theoretical framing of problems and the practical implementation of solutions. On occasions, a mismatch between theory and practice emerges that results in scientists failing to be informed by phenomena that emerge in field implementation of management, and conversely practitioners failing to avail of the best available scientific evidence. To ensure that students emerging from their graduate training in the environmental sciences are prepared for vocations in environmental management, this course will introduce the major branches of professional management in a field setting. This will help them transcend the theory/practice divide. Collaborating with several organizations in the region, this course consists in field visits, professional seminars, case studies, and so hand-on workshops throughout the region.

ENV 405 | INTERNSHIP | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A course of study is set out in agreement with a supervising professor that outlines an internship experience, including reflective assignments. Permission of instructor and chair required.

ENV 406 | INDEPENDENT PROJECT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A course of study is set out in agreement with a supervising professor that will inculcate the student with a very specific set of knowledge, or skill set.

ENV 407 | RESEARCH FOR MASTER THESIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course prepares students for thesis research. In agreement with research supervisory the topics may include accounts of the nature and philosophy of science, experimental design, scientific ethics, and scientific writing. Students will prepare a thesis research proposal on a topic to be determined in the first week of the course.

ENV 410 | ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

An examination of the physical, chemical, biological and engineering properties of soils, their genesis and classification, how they function as sites of waste disposal, and their role in global agricultural production. The course includes a three-hour lab and a mandatory Saturday field trip. Recommended prerequisites for this class are LSP 120 or LSP 121 or MAT 130 or the equivalent and CHE 103 or CHE 130 or ENV 203.

ENV 415 | PLANT ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course focuses on how plants are affected by abiotic factors in the environment and interactions with other organisms. Goals are to improve students' abilities to understand research papers, present overviews of current research, design experiments, and analyze data. The course includes weekly labs with greenhouse experiments or field trips followed by data analysis. Topics include germination ecology, pollination biology, competition between plants, and effects of herbivory. Recommended prerequisites are ENV 250 or BIO 215 or the equivalent.

ENV 420 | CONSERVATION BIOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary field that has developed in response to the challenge of preserving species and ecosystems. With a specific focus on the Chicago area, students in this course will: assess key threats to biodiversity and the challenges associated with conservation of native communities, evaluate how different institutions implement conservation in the region, and engage with the primary literature related to the field of conservation biology. Recommended prerequisite is ENV 250 or BIO 215.

ENV 422 | ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will introduce students to the conceptual and methodological tools of ecosystem ecology. The course will focus on understanding the fundamental structure and function of ecosystems but will also address very recent debates on the economic value of ecosystem services, the role of biological diversity in maintaining ecosystem processes, and the consequences of stressed and degraded ecosystems for human welfare. Finally, we assess the role of ecosystem ecology in designing sustainable restoration projects. Recommended prerequisite is ENV 250 OR BIO 215.

ENV 440 | URBAN ECOLOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course we examine the way ecological ideas can increase our understanding of cities in ways that assist us in making cities more habitable - cleaner, healthier and more biodiverse. We will pay considerable attention to the ways in which ecology can be broadened by its encounter with disciplines that have historically paid more attention to the city: urban sociology, anthropology, economics, demography, architecture and planning. This course has a required lab; some Saturday field trips.

ENV 441 | URBAN FORESTS AS SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Urban forests include all the trees, forests, and greenspaces in cities and towns. Urban forest management, or urban forestry, is the discipline/profession that seeks to plan and manage this green infrastructure in order to provide ecological, economic, and social benefits to all residents. Trees and vegetation have long been protected and planted in cities and towns for a variety of reasons. Recently, urban forestry has expanded to be a lead focus in the broader arena of urban ecology and urban ecosystem management, with a clear goal of creating sustainable ecosystems. This course will look at urban forests through the lens of social-ecological systems (SESs) of linked human and natural components, with a focus on teaching students the hands-on skills of urban forest management. The course will utilize the talents of a number of guest speakers and field experience facilitators who are professionals in urban forestry to give students a practical, real world introduction t o the subject. The DePaul University campus and the City of Chicago and surrounding region will serve as our field laboratory to view an actively managed urban forest. Recommended prerequisite is ENV 250 OR BIO 215.

ENV 450 | THESIS RESEARCH | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed for students undertaking research projects in conjunction with their thesis.

ENV 490 | SPECIAL TOPICS | 2-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable topics. Variable credit.

ENV 499 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 2-4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Permission of instructor and chair required. Variable credit.

ENV 506 | SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE: ENVIRONMENTAL LIMITS, HUMAN NEEDS, & SYSTEMS THINKING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course aims to orient students to the problems of the `Anthropocene? ? a new geologic epoch characterized by climate change, increasing human population, pollution of air, water and soil, overuse of natural resources, and underserving of human needs. This course will help students think about solutions to these challenges through the discipline of `sustainability science,? and build `systems thinking? skills.

Graduate standing is a prerequisite for this class.