SNL Liberal Studies (SNC)

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SNC 185 | THE BEATLES AND THE CREATIVE PROCESS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Beatles are significant in many ways: they were an unprecedented show business phenomenon; they were leaders of Sixties cultural rebellion; and they stand, for many, as a signal instance of popular entertainment attaining the status of high art. This course will examine the musical craftsmanship of the Beatles, focusing on their work as songwriters and record makers. Recent audio and print releases documenting the group's performing and recording history provide a unique and detailed glimpse of the Beatles' creative process. We will utilize these materials to closely trace the development of the group's work while using other resources to place it in a larger historical and cultural context. The goal is to shed critical light on this recent chapter in cultural history. That discussion will, in turn, highlight questions about creativity in a modern context where commerce vies with art, technology redefines performance and an emerging global village culture transforms concepts of originality and tradition. Arts and Literature.

SNC 186 | SPIRITUALITY AND HOMELESSNESS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the broad issue of homelessness by providing students the opportunity to reflect upon a service learning experience at a community-based organization that serves the homeless population in Chicago. Students will explore what can be learned about themselves as reflective practitioners, service learners, and spiritual human beings when reflecting upon this experiential learning process. Through the class discussions, assigned readings, invited speakers, and journal assignments, students will reflect on their own beliefs and perceptions of homelessness and analyze the history, causes, and policy associated with this societal problem. Junior Year Experiential Learning.

SNC 187 | RACE AND IDENTITY IN THE AMERICAN THEATER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore issues of race and racial identity in American society through the medium of theater. Students will examine a diverse range of theatrical pieces and consider the social and political context for each work as well as the impact each has had on American culture. The class will also view a play on these themes at a Chicago theater. Arts and Literature.

SNC 188 | PROBLEMS AND ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to moral philosophy with emphasis on the conflict between "moral relativism" (or "subjective" ethics) on the one hand and "moral realism" (or "objective" ethics) on the other. During the course you will be introduced to classic theories and leading figures in the history of ethics, from Plato and Aristotle to Kant and Nietzsche. Course content will focus on issues (e.g., poverty, drug use, capital punishment, sexual behavior, euthanasia, biomedical research, animal rights, political violence) at the center of contemporary ethical debate in the United States and throughout the world. Philosophical Inquiry.

SNC 189 | CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN/AMERICAN INDIAN ISSUES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Native Americans are part of our history and heritage, yet many Americans have little knowledge beyond stereotypes. While invisible to the mainstream, Native American cultures are surviving, striving and in some cases, thriving as we enter the new millennium. This course will explore the complex issues facing Native Americans today through discussions, films, readings, experiential learning activities and Native American news media to enable students to gain a cross-cultural perspective. Students will choose an area of focus on this subject and conduct independent research to present to their classmates. Self, Society and the Modern World.

SNC 190 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES IN CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is important for students who seek to gain a comprehensive understanding of African-American history in the United States. It will begin with discussions of African culture, the Atlantic Slave Trade, and early forms of slavery/indenturing. It will pay particular attention to the colonial and Revolutionary experience, delving into the mass exodus of Africans during the Revolutionary War, and African-American's role and position in the country's formative years. Enslavement, the Civil War and Reconstruction will follow as key areas of study. In every discussion, students will be asked to look for parallels between the contemporary and 18th and 19th century African-American experience and, where appropriate, to identify key social and cultural thinkers and leaders of the various historical periods. The primary texts for the course will be John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom, articles and readings written by scholars and important early African-American artists and intellectuals, and video presentations. Understanding the Past.

SNC 191 | ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND RELIGION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course develops students' understandings of the scientific and religious constructions of self in the modern world (natural and social). The institutions and bodies of knowledge comprising science, religion, and their overlap are critically analyzed. Key historic debates are examined, for example: the Vatican's trial of Galileo for his teachings of a heliocentric universe; the controversial reception of Darwin's theory of evolution; and the 2001 U.S. policy on embryonic stem cell research. Through such analyses, the course develops students' skills in making ethically-informed decisions and thus recognizing their roles in the public debates involving the intersection of science and religion. Self, Society and the Modern World.

SNC 192 | NEW ORLEANS IN SONG, STORY & STRUGGLE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The tapestry of New Orleans culture is tremendously rich and varied. This course will concentrate on two strands in that tapestry: music from New Orleans and fiction about it. Students will learn about music forms which originated in the city or its environs and which have gone on to dazzle the world, including jazz, rhythm and blues, zydeco and funk. We will situate these art forms in social and historical context and examine the complex creative processes which have shaped them. We will become familiar with innovators and icons such as Louis Armstrong, Professor Longhair, Clifton Chenier, the Neville Brothers and Dr. John. We will also read works by literary artists who have a background in and/or fascination with New Orleans, including The Awakening by Kate Chopin, A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams, and Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed. Moreover, we will consider the role played in American history and imagination by New Orleans, as well as the role played by images and fantasies of New Orleans in struggles for social justice at the local and national level. Arts and Literature.

SNC 193 | SEXUAL ORIENTATION & SCIENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will engage you in scientific inquiry on the nature of sexual orientation. You will be challenged to master the scientific content of leading programs of research on twins, brain and other anatomical structures, hormones, genetic linkages, birth-order, and animal behavior through assigned readings, lectures, and multimedia resources. Moreover, you will also engage in the scientific process through a collaborative research project concerning an aspect of sexual orientation that leads you through the steps of stating a question, designing a study, collecting and analyzing data, and interpreting the results. You will also develop skills in identifying the limits to particular forms of scientific inquiry by recognizing the constraints of methods, sources of bias, reliability of results, and certainty of conclusions. This course will encourage you to place the modern research within ethical and social contexts in which to make judgments about the potential relevance and impacts of scientific knowledge about sexual orientation. Scientific Inquiry [SI].

LSP 120 is a prerequisite for this class.

SNC 194 | CHINA: MONEY, POWER AND THE 21ST CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This online course analyzes the dramatic impact of the greatest migration of people in the history of the world, which is occurring right now, in China. Students will become more aware of the relationship between growth in China and the balance of power in the world. Understanding China's two economic systems, one country policy will help learners better understand diverse cultures, inequities and differing theories about self and society. Theory, current and projected economic and demographic data and academic research will equip students with the skills to analyze the institutions, societies and decisions that will shape the world in the 21st century.

SNC 195 | UNDERSTANDING GLOBAL HEALTH CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Many of the greatest challenges in public health are global. This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to discuss the major underlying determinants of poor health and the relationship between health and political, social and economic development. Drawing upon the sciences, social sciences and humanities, learners will be introduced to the evolution of modern approaches to the setting of global health priorities, the functions and roles of health systems, an overview of current global health practices, and the major institutional players in global health. We will explore the factors shaping the global distribution of disease and their connection with issues of social, economic and political development, as reflected in the Millennium Development Goals. We will also consider the impacts of globalization on health risks and availability of health resources.

SNC 196 | BEAUTY POLITICS IN CULTURAL CONTEXT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How can we celebrate our different skin tones, body sizes, hair textures, and cultures, and yet still acknowledge our similarities? How can hair/body stories help us understand each other and ourselves? This course explores the complex ways the body is portrayed, (mis)understood, and celebrated worldwide. The experiences of hair/body politics of African descended peoples are centered and Latin, Asian, and European cultures are also discussed. Critiques of scholarship, media, and applied research will afford students the opportunity to examine social constructs about gender, sexuality, race, class, ability, and emerging issues such as biracialism and multiculturalism in global, virtual and political contexts.

SNC 197 | ANALYZING AUSTEN'S PRIDE AND PREJUDICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Jane Austen must have known something about universal truths. Her novel, Pride and Prejudice, which begins with the sentence quoted above, was first published in 1813. Still in print today, it has also been made into at least eleven movies, four of which were released since 2000, including a Mormon and a Bollywood version. In this class, we will read the novel in the context of the gender and class norms at the time Austen wrote her book and then consider how Austen's exploration of universal truths is reinterpreted in more contemporary film versions of this novel. In exploring Austen's creation and the many reinterpretations of her work, we will use both analytic and creative writing assignments as well as class discussion to examine how context informs creativity and how creativity informs analysis. You most definitely do not need to be a creative writer to take this class.

SNC 198 | MINDFULNESS MEDITATION RETREAT AT STARVED ROCK | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This online-offsite hybrid course includes a four-day mindfulness meditation retreat at Starved Rock State Park in Utica, IL as well as online learning activities throughout the quarter. Mindfulness meditation practices are powerful ways of regulating and investigating our awareness of our experience. They are rooted in Buddhist traditions and are being widely re-interpreted by neuroscientists, psychologists, philosophers and others. There is a fee for the retreat. Contact Dr. Michael Skelley at mskelley@depaul.edu for more information and permission to enroll.

Junior Standing or above is a prerequisite for this class.

SNC 199 | WORK, PLAY AND REST: INTEGRATING THE FRAGMENTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Life has become fragmented. In our modern lives, we strive to maintain work, play and rest in separate realms, within which we work hard, play hard, and even rest hard, all in the hope of finding balance. But when work invades play, and rest is sacrificed for either one, it might be time to shift the paradigm of separateness we have sought to maintain. This course will explore ways we can integrate the fragments of our lives in order to find more fulfillment, balance, satisfaction, and consequently relief both within these three arenas and in the "gray areas" in between. Learning will occur in two modalities, each of which will enhance the other: experiential guided movement, storytelling and vocal activities from the improvisational practice of InterPlay (http://www.interplay.org/) and the study of literature (articles, books, websites and videos) concerning mind-body awareness. Through the in-class practices of InterPlay, students will explore how stressors are held in the body, and define for themselves which aspects of creative expression help to release what no longer serves. Basic movement, storytelling and vocal activities will be introduced in an incremental way, with no prior experience necessary. The focus will be on both individual expression and collaborative possibilities, and personal as well as community and organizational applications will be explored. In our study of the science behind mind-body awareness through class discussions and written assignments, students will explore the application of concepts in conjunction with the experiential model offered by the InterPlay practice. Part practical activities, part reflection, and part synthesis of defined concepts and models, students will be asked to come to this class as willing participants and identify what methods and systems are applicable to their own lives, and what, from their unique vantage point, could constitute elements toward a new model of health and wholeness.

SNC 201 | PSYCHOLOGY FROM AN AFRICAN-CENTERED PERSPECTIVE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course utilizes an African-centered theoretical framework to examine salient themes pertinent to the psychology of people of African descent, including child development, family functioning, identity, education, racial oppression, spirituality, and healing. It takes an historical and topical approach to foster greater understanding about the course content. Through this examination, the learner will become more knowledgeable about the psychological experiences of people of African descent, the role of history and culture in human development, and the subjectivity of research in the social and natural sciences. They will also reflect on the relevance of the course material to their personal lives.

SNC 202 | GLOBAL BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY AND THE UNITED NATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, discussions focus on global business and technology issues U.S. and Mexican companies face today and UN experts in New York bring other countries into the global perspective via video conferencing. Topics include how corporations are using technology to facilitate their global operations; the work of the United Nations in helping implement corporate responsibility, international labor rules and human rights in businesses; best practices in cross-cultural business; and, other related global business issues. Several students outside of Chicago will participate via Scopia desktop video conference application. Students and professors at University Panamericana in Mexico City and in Guadalajara will participate in discussions with the UN experts and with DePaul students via video conferencing. UN discussions are videotaped and posted on DePaul iTunes for student review.

SNC 203 | PARTICIPATION AND DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course explores inequalities in American democratic participation, investigating why different groups do or do not engage with the political process. The course begins with some famous arguments about why participation matters. Trends in voter turnout then become the primary object of study, but we also consider other forms of participation including writing to members of Congress, attending political meetings, and contributing money. Different factors we explore over ten weeks include the impact of education, income, age, and knowledge about and psychological interest in politics. We also investigate legal-institutional barriers to participation, both historically and in the present day.

SNC 204 | DEMOCRACY IN EVERYDAY LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Democracy may be described as a form of government in which the general public can participate in its decision making process. However, democracy is often used as a term to identify any system that is not patently a dictatorship. Democracy may be addressed not only as a political, but also as a social system with implications in everyday life. How does literature about social and private life define democracy? What criteria do democratic environments meet? How should people behave to foster democratic environments? How do democratic leaders behave? This course will foster a profound understanding of democracy and democratic behavior and identify criteria, which define democratic environments like equality, solidarity, positive human relationships, participation and commitment to each other. These and other criteria will be analyzed critically and applied to everyday contexts in the private sphere and the workplace. The role of authority, power and leadership in a democratic environment will be discussed. The course offers a wide range of activities like research for literature, critical reading and discussion of topics, analysis of cases, simulation of democratic and non-democratic environments and problem solving of real life issues. The ideas of others serve as a common course content, as presented in the material assigned to this course. Students are asked to participate actively and critically, to work individually and in study groups, using their own experience as a field of analysis and reflection. Active participation in group activities will make the course itself a model for a democratic teaching and learning environment.

SNC 205 | RESISTANCE DURING THE HOLOCAUST AND WORLD WAR II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the history of the Holocaust in the context of the Second World War (1939-1945) with a central focus on examples of resistance to discrimination, fascism and oppression. We will explore varied forms of opposition including armed resistance, spiritual resistance, resistance through writing and identity preservation. We will read autobiographies, view documentary and dramatic films, and use museum resources to develop our understanding of resistance. Required activities include a visit to the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center (Skokie, IL). We will also consider the implications of this history for making ethical choices in our world today.

SNC 206 | THE FIGHT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS: ONE WOMAN'S CRUSADE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Helen Prejean is a leading human rights activist in the United States. For the past 30 years, she has helped shape conversation about equal treatment for all within the criminal justice system, especially persons of color and the materially poor. Dead Man Walking, the eyewitness account of her experience accompanying condemned prisoners to execution, has had a major influence on discussion of violence, poverty, civil rights, criminal law, and social justice. In this course, we use her work and interact with her personally to study power inequities across race and class lines that perpetuate injustice and examine her strategies for reform.

SNC 207 | URBAN DIRT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a course designed for the student who desires to know the difference, complexity, and the diversity between soil and dirt. The benefits of learning about soil are multi-fold: understanding the Earth, understanding how and where your food grows, gardening, impact on water quality, and most of all understanding your role in improving overall environmental quality and sustainability. In addition, this class will offer introductory knowledge of soil and its dynamism. Although learning about soil can be very scientific, there are several social and artistic views of soils. If you ever wanted to know why soils are various colors, various fertility, uses, mapping, home to various organisms, then this is the course to take. Understanding the complexities of soil will aid in understanding Earth and its intricacy.

SNC 208 | THE BILL OF RIGHTS IN CONTEMPORARY LIFE AND WORK | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The Bill of Rights is that part of the Constitution that protects you from undue and unwarranted governmental regulation and interference. Learn how your rights of free speech, privacy and association in the workplace, on the street and in your home are secured by the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution. What does the government allow you to say and do in the presence of fellow workers? How safe is your home from police searches? Are there limits to whom you are allowed to associate with on a public street or even in the privacy of your own home? This course will deal with these and similar questions. Along the way, we will learn about the history and theory behind the adoption of the Constitution, how judges and lawyers interpret the Constitution, in particular the Bill of Rights, and what role the Constitution plays in the debate over the significant legal and social issues of our day, such as abortion, the death penalty, gay marriage, and physician-assisted suicide. We will read and discuss political theory, the Bill of Rights and actual court cases.

SNC 209 | EXPLORING EARTH'S PHYSICAL FEATURES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course advances student exploration of earth's 4.5 billion year geologic record in order to evaluate the planet's evolution and the interrelationships between humans and landforms. Through the application of scientific reasoning, mathematical inference, and prevailing technologies used by geologists, emphasis is on plate tectonics, geologic time, the rock cycle, weathering, earthquakes, fluvial features, rock structures, volcanoes, mountains, plateaus, plains, glacial features, deserts, caves, and coasts. Students also assess human reliance on landforms, the economics of landforms, and cases of earth pseudoscience. Learning is assessed through labs, fieldtrips, a scientifically-formatted research paper, an exam, and contributions to online discussions.

SNC 210 | PREHISTORIC LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course promotes students' investigation of fossils to interpret the character of 3.5 billion years of biological evolution and ecological change on earth. By way of scientific reasoning, mathematical inference, and applicable technologies, emphasis is on the exploration of the earliest evidence of life, development of multi-celled plants and animals, dinosaur evolution, mass extinction events, mammal diversification, human origins as well as appraisal of the societal reliance on fossil resources and the persistent debate over evolution versus creation. Learning is assessed through labs, a fieldtrip, an exam, video summaries, contributions to online discussions, and a research paper in a scientific format.

SNC 211 | WRITE WHERE YOU ARE: WRITING ABOUT THE PLACES WE LIVE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In "A Walk in Chicago: Never a City so Real," Alex Kotlowitz, a "Chicagoan by accident," claims, "An imperfect place, Chicago is America's city; it dreams America's dream." In this course, students will investigate the ways in which location has shaped their own American dream. Place is an indispensable factor in any person's negotiation of his or her dream, as Kotlowitz points out in his portraits of individuals who have shaped and been shaped by their city, Chicago. To understand ourselves, then, we must understand our cities. To understand our cities we must understand their influences from science (geology, biology, ecology), art (literature, film) and social science (history, psychology, sociology). To write about our cities, we must understand and synthesize the city and our selves. In the convergence of these experiences comes a new understanding of space, place and identity. This subject requires students to investigate how events of personal significance are affected by location and the disciplines. This class will meet in the classroom five times; students will also be required to complete four field trips to locations in and around their city and one "virtual" field trip. Sharing on D2L will complete the field trip experience. Students will grow to appreciate their home cities/towns for their evolution and current struggles; students will learn about themselves by placing themselves in the midst of this evolution and struggle. Writing the personal essay, which requires synthesis of one's self-reflection, reflection on one's surroundings, and research into the place we are located, is the medium for transformation and understanding to take place.

SNC 212 | ROOTED IN THE CITY: WRITERS & WRITING IN CHICAGO | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Who are the writers rooted in Chicago? What were and are their concerns, themes, styles? How can they teach us about the city, but also about writing? In this class, students will read, discuss and write about work written by such Chicago writers as Nelson Algren, Gwendolyn Brooks, Stuart Dybek, Sandra Cisneros, Studs Terkel, Marc Smith, and Mike Royko. We will consider the nature of civic engagement and creativity in the literary arts, as well as pay close attention to the formal elements of the poems, short stories, and essays read in this class. We?ll also explore how these texts compel us to think about power and its circulation in cultural as well as social contexts.

SNC 213 | FAMILY LIFE: THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF FAMILIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In history, families have been defined as mother, father, and children. In our current experience, more families differ from that model than comply with it. Family structure is evolving. Missing fathers, single parents, and blended families are only a few of the changes to the family structure that have occurred with some significance beginning in the 1950s. What influences family structure? Do economics and education make a difference? Are race and ethnicity important factors? What about gender, personality and religion? Is the two parent family necessary? What role do grandparents and great grandparents play in the changing family? Perhaps the most important question we can ask about the family is what comes next. What are the many ways in which families might be redesigned in the future? How do these changes impact individuals in society?.

SNC 214 | SOCIETY AND THE FAMILY, PLOTTING THE FUTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In history, families have been defined as mother, father, and children. In our current experience, more families differ from that model than comply with it. Family structure is evolving. Missing fathers, single parents, and blended families are only a few of the changes to the family structure that have occurred with some significance beginning in the 1950s. In this course, learners will pursue the following questions: What influences family structure? Do economics and education make a difference? Are race and ethnicity important factors? What about gender, personality and religion? Is the two parent family necessary? What role do grandparents and great grandparents play in the changing family? Perhaps the most important question we can ask about the family is what comes next. What are the many ways in which families might be redesigned in the future?.

SNC 215 | ISSUES IN HEALTH POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The goal of this course is to provide a general overview of the American health care and health insurance systems. We first will discuss the debates over the enactment and framing of the American constitution, and the political institutions that the nation then developed. We then will analyze the health care system that emerged in this political context, focusing on 1) the rise of the private health insurance system; 2) the incentives provided by government to encourage employers to purchase such insurance on behalf of their employees; and 3) the debate over the role of government in providing coverage for those outside the employer-sponsored health insurance systems. We will examine in some depth the evolution and current context of the Medicaid Program, taking a close look at the politics that led to the 2003 Medicare Modernization Act, as well as the issues raised by the implementation of that law. The following questions will be examined in this course: Is it possible to provide coverage to the uninsured without increasing the national debt? What are the main drivers of rising health care costs and what are the options for cost-containment? What are the options for aiding the uninsured? What are the options for paying for any such initiatives? What are the longstanding obstacles to comprehensive reform proposals? What are the politics of the current, Affordable Care Act, reform initiative? Why is it that the American health delivery system suffers from specialty maldistribution (too many specialists and not enough generalists) and geographic maldistribution (too many providers in some communities and too few in others)? What is managed care? What does the managed care industry look like today? What is the difference between disease management, care management and the current efforts to create "medical homes?" What are provider profiles and how are they used to improve quality? Why is it that the nation does not have an effective long-term care insurance system? What are the alternatives to institutionalization for those in need of long-term care services?.

SNC 216 | LEISURE, RECREATION AND HEALTH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will stimulate your thinking about the meaning of leisure in your life. Leisure today and historically has been central to the human experience. It is an elemental experience, essential to the total well-being of every person; it is a reflection and expression of the cultural values of a society; it is an important vehicle for medical treatment. Leisure and recreation services are also essential for healthy communities in terms of social climate, environmental quality, and economic stability. Leisure services comprise one of the largest and fastest growing industries in the world, whether measured in dollars spent, persons served, hours of time devoted, or resources used. The study of leisure and recreation is a broad discipline, combining diverse fields of study and professional practice. This course will (1) illustrate the importance of leisure to you and your loved ones, (2) contribute to your ability to become an informed consumer of leisure, (3) question the binary relationship of work and leisure, (4) teach you how to use leisure to increase emotional and physical health, resulting in a higher quality of life and, (5) demonstrate social injustice related to leisure behavior and administration. The course will be interactive and.

SNC 217 | SOUTH AFRICA AND THE QUEST FOR CHANGE: 25 YEARS AND COUNTING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In 1990, sociopolitical forces in South Africa began formally dismantling the structure of racial segregation known as "apartheid" that had been in force since 1948. In 1994, the first bi-racial democratic elections were held, bringing the African National Congress (ANC) to power and Nelson Mandela to the presidency. Since then, the Republic of South Africa has faced considerable challenges on various fronts, which required careful calibration of the new governance system: providing social and economic equality for all races and groups; maintaining the country's economic strength while fostering social justice; and battling the largest HIV/AIDS epidemic in the world. Additionally, over the years, the ANC has seen challenges to its power both within its own ranks and from other parties and groups, a situation likely to intensify with the recent death of Mandela, its most prominent historical leader. This course seeks to give students a thorough grounding in the recent history of South Africa, with particular emphasis on the evolution of its Constitution, on the features that have made it one of the most advanced economies in the whole Africa, and on the country's struggles with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Students will visit relevant sites and programs and interact with experienced professionals in these 3 domains in both Johannesburg and surrounding areas (Pretoria and Soweto), and Cape Town. Sites include the Apartheid Museum, the Constitutional Court, and Gold Reef City in Johannesburg, the Union Building in Pretoria, Soweto Township, and Robben Island and the District Six Museum in Cape Town. Side trips are also planned to a game reserve and other areas of natural beauty near these two cities.

SNC 218 | THE HAPPINESS PROJECT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What is happiness? How do we know that we are happy? How can we become happier in our lives? In recent years, there have been an increasing number of college courses dedicated to the study of happiness, positive psychology, life satisfaction, etc. This course will be an introduction to how various fields and disciplines are examining topics relevant to the nature of happiness and well-being, while providing an opportunity for students to examine their own ideas and expectations for happiness. Using Gretchen Rubin's popular book, The Happiness Project, as a guide, we will review the latest scholarship, theories and research in psychology and the sciences, as well as religion, ancient wisdom and popular culture, to determine what is known and presumed about happiness. Participants in the course will develop and assess their own "happiness project" during the last several weeks of the course.

SNC 219 | CONNECTING WITH AFRICA: CULTURAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES IN EAST AFRICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This travel course will introduce students to two East African countries, Kenya and Tanzania, where they will have the opportunity to investigate cultural and social issues in accordance with their particular interests for study. Students will have the opportunity to study and compare issues of cultural, economic, social, and political interest as they manifest themselves in the USA and in East Africa. Intensive study in Chicago and onsite in Kenya and Tanzania will give students a unique opportunity to reflect on and then compare and contrast what goes on in their own country and in these two East African countries. One of the main aims of this course therefore is to give students the opportunity to engage in passionate conversation with Kenyans and Tanzanians on issues of justice and peace, politics and social services in order to raise their consciousness on these global issues that face humanity in East Africa and in so many other parts of the globe today.

SNC 220 | ETHICAL ISSUES IN BIOMEDICINE AND HEALTH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Should parents be allowed to genetically "engineer" designer babies? Given the rapid pace of developments in genetic engineering, this capacity is eminent. Emerging technological capacities in a variety of arenas are creating a host of social questions and potential ethical implications: What are the ethical issues associated with accelerating accumulation of health data? Do pharmaceutical companies have a moral obligation to expand global access to life-saving AIDS drugs? Given our ever-unfolding understanding of the human brain, what regulatory concerns ought to accompany the rollout of new, powerful brain-based biotechnologies? Which methods and approaches are needed to make sense of the impact of science and technology on people's lives worldwide? This course is both an introduction to bioethics, -- an area concerned with moral questions related to health, medicine and society, as well as a reflection upon the ethical and social implications of rapidly emerging technological and scientific capacities. In this course, learners will learn and use ethical theories to consider and analyze general bioethical issues with special attention paid to the unique challenges that emerge as a result of rapid advancements in scientific and technological knowledge. While this course is housed in the School for New Learning (SNL), it is also cross-listed with DePaul University's department of public health. For graduate students taking this course for credit, there is an additional assessment required, specified in the syllabus section below. This course will also require students to deploy and hone critical thinking skills, writing-related capacities as well as reasoning skills.

SNC 221 | EVERYDAY EVIDENCE: HOW SCIENCE SHAPES DECISIONS IN EVERYDAY LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a science course designed for those majoring in non-science disciplines. In this class we will explore the debates that are taking place in our society right no, from ideas about evolution, climate change and genetically modified foods, to the more personal issues of our diet, exercise habits and medical care for our kids. The question facing us is how, in the great flood of information available to us, do we decide what is right for us? To answer this, we will examine what constitutes good evidence, how scientists know what they know, why science seems to always be changing, and why it seems hard to get a scientist to just state the facts. Each weekly topic will be used as an example of how science shapes what we know, and how to distinguish good science from sketchy. We will also explore the role media plays in shaping public understanding of science. In addition to the weekly discussions, students will pick a topic of their own choosing to research and will write a short literature review of that topic as their final paper.

SNC 222 | CONNECTING THOUGHT AND BEHAVIOR IN THE WORKPLACE, THE COMMUNITY, AND IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to practical concepts of Cognitive Behavioral Psychology and offers them new perspectives on how to observe and understand the interaction between thoughts and behaviors in their daily lives. Students will evaluate the tendencies and correlations between what a person "thinks" and what that person "does" through observation and interpretation of their own experiences. A report will be generated that will include an analysis of the student's own cognitive behavioral tendencies and a plan for personal development.

SNC 223 | ACTIVE CITIZENS: MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE COMMUNITY, WORKPLACE WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Americans are known for active participation in organizations that strengthen our communities. We coach our kid's sports teams, take meals to members of our congregations, work for candidates that we believe in and join marches to support or oppose government action. With all these activities, we engage with other members of our community and workplace to make it better for ourselves and our families and to promote social justice. In this class, we will develop the knowledge and practice skills that enhance civic engagement and explore the role of citizens' voices in a democracy in the face of powerful political and economic interests. (For EL credit, students complete 25 hours of service in a Chicago community. Those unable to complete placement arranged by the Steans Center must submit partnership agreement with another organization by the end of the first week). (2-4 quarter hours)

SNC 224 | ZOMBIES: MODERN MYTHS, RACE, AND CAPITALISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The figure of the zombie entered US popular culture from Haitian spiritual practice bringing with it concerns of power and race. As the zombie mythology developed in the United States, it has been adapted to address issues as varied as gender and capitalism. Zombie mythology has become so prominent that the philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari asserted that the zombie was the only unique myth of the twentieth century. This class will examine the development of the zombie myth as a reflection of US societal concerns while using the lenses of Post-Colonial and Post-Marxist theory. Specifically, we will use these lenses to explore Halperin's film White Zombie, Romero?s films Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead, Kirkman's comic books The Walking Dead, and Boyle's 28 Days Later.

SNC 225 | BIODIVERSITY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The science of Biodiversity is the study of life on earth, both past and present. It involves the exploration and measurement of the amount of genetic, species, and ecological variation on earth and is emerging as one humanity?s most important and urgent endeavors. Scientific efforts to study earth?s biodiversity have intensified because of our growing appreciation of the role human population growth and urbanization play in accelerating the extinction of plant and animal species. This course introduces students to the nature of science and the central issues concerning life on earth including: the current state of biodiversity, valuing life?s variations, human dependence on biological diversity, the origin and extinction of species, mass extinction, critical habitats at risk, and policies and approaches to conserve biodiversity.

SNC 226 | CHICAGO AND NEW YORK: VARIED HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

New York and Chicago have stood for many years as America?s premier cities, symbols of American power as well as U.S. expansionism. In this course, we will explore aspects of the rich histories of these longtime rivals while focusing on some of their common themes and palpable differences. Students will be treated to readings, documentaries and primary source materials that address such varied subjects as urban fiscal policy, comparative political histories and icons, culture and geography. Lastly, we will consider the role that both of these cities have played in U.S. history, delve into the distinctions between global and national cities and explore their respective approaches to urban life over the course of the past three decades.

SNC 227 | BRAVE NEW WORLD AND 1984: DIVERGING DYSTOPIAS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

On January 25, 2017, the New York Times published an article, "George Orwell's '1984' Is Suddenly a Bestseller," which reported that Orwell's classic novel had suddenly seen an enormous spike in sales, as had other dystopian novels, including Brave New World. Indeed, the adjective "Orwellian," a reference to the way language can be twisted into pretzel logic by the powers that be, has become a commonplace of contemporary discourse and, as anyone familiar with The Hunger Games can tell you, dystopian fiction has been big in young adult literature for a number of years. But Nineteen Eighty-Four and Brave New World stand, by a strong consensus, as the definitive dystopian novels of the last hundred-some years. This is at least in part due to the fact that both novels are so well written - such riveting pieces of literary art; but it is also due to the perceived prophetic power the novels seem to share, although each posits a different kind of grim future for humankind. This course will engage closely with these two masterworks (and related texts and subtopics) from the perspectives of artistic genre; fiction and social commentary; politico-historical context; and intertextuality.

SNC 282 | JAZZ AGE PARIS: 1919-1939 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a history of Parisian society and culture in the era between the two world wars. We will explore issues of race, class and gender in the interwar period in French society. We will also examine the role of American writers, artists, musicians and performers in the cultural world of Paris, the City of Light, and an outpost in the Harlem Renaissance.

SNC 320 | MAMMALOGY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The goal of this course is to introduce you to the origins, evolution, ecology, and biodiversity of the class Mammalia. Key topics will include mammalian paleobiology, anatomy, classification, genetics, reproduction, thermoregulation, locomotion, behavior, ecology, and conservation. Special emphasis will be on investigating the connections of mammalian evolutionary biology to human health issues including disease, nutrition, physical activity, injury, mental health, and overpopulation. Online learning will incorporate readings, discussions, virtual labs, and a home science kit. Self-directed onsite inquiry will involve investigation of mammals at a museum, zoological park, and/or nature reserve. Prerequisite: None.