Spanish (SPN)

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SPN 101 | BASIC SPANISH I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the first course in a three-course introductory sequence that as a whole constitutes "first year college Spanish" (SPN 101, SPN 102, and SPN 103). The course has three main goals: to develop some basic knowledge of Spanish as a foreign language, to develop some communicative skills in that language, and to attain some basic knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world and learn some cultural differences between the U.S. and these cultures. This course is intended for students who have never taken a Spanish class before or who score 1-30 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207).

SPN 101S | BASIC SPANISH I FOR SUMMER | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(Covers the equivalent of SPN 101 and the first half of SPN 102.) The first half of beginning Spanish. Listening to, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish in a cultural context for the beginning student.

SPN 102 | BASIC SPANISH II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the second course in a three-course introductory sequence that as a whole constitutes "first year college Spanish" (SPN 101, SPN 102, and SPN 103). The course has various goals. The first one is to develop some basic communicative skills in Spanish as a second language. These include but are not limited to the following sample abilities: talking about pastimes and leisure activities, talking about activities in the past, describing typical household chores, using expressions associated with technology, and giving instructions. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 101 at DePaul (or equivalent) or who score 31-45 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207).

SPN 103 | BASIC SPANISH III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the third course in a three-course introductory sequence that as a whole constitutes "first year college Spanish" (SPN 101, SPN 102, and SPN 103). The course has several goals. The first one is to develop some basic communicative skills in Spanish as a second language. These include but are not limited to the following sample abilities: taking about feelings and mood changes, talking about what people do to and for each other, expressing wishes and desires, narrating present and past actions, describing current events, using vocabulary related to professions and daily life. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 102 at DePaul (or equivalent) or who score 46-55 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207).

SPN 103S | BASIC SPANISH III FOR SUMMER | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

(Covers the equivalent of the second half of SPN 102 and all of SPN 103.) The second half of beginning Spanish. Further work on the basic elements of the Spanish language, spoken as well as written, with due regard to the cultural context of Spanish expression.

SPN 104 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the first course of the sequence of Intermediate Spanish (SPN 104, SPN 105, and SPN 106). The course follows a content-based approach where students learn about Hispanic culture through interaction and communication. The fundamental language learning goal of this course is to help students express, interpret, and negotiate meaning in context. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 103 at DePaul (or equivalent), or who score 56-65 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207). SPN 104, 114, and 124 are equivalent courses. Students who place into SPN 104 but are interested in service learning should consider registering for SPN 124, which is the same level but with a service-learning component.

SPN 105 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the second course of the sequence of Intermediate Spanish (SPN 104, SPN 105, and SPN 106). The course to follows a content-based approach where students learn about Hispanic culture through interaction and communication. The fundamental language learning goal of this course is to help students express, interpret, and negotiate meaning in context. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 104 at DePaul (or equivalent), or who score 66-74 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207). SPN 105, 115, and 125 are equivalent courses. Students who place into SPN 105 but are interested in service learning should consider registering for SPN 125, which is the same level but with a service-learning component.

SPN 106 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the third course in the sequence of Intermediate Spanish (SPN 104, SPN 105, and SPN 106). The course follows a content-based approach where students learn about Hispanic culture through interaction and communication. The fundamental language learning goal of this course is to help students express, interpret, and negotiate meaning in context. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 105 at DePaul (or equivalent), or who score 75-95 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207). SPN 106 and 126 are equivalent courses. Students who place into SPN 106 but are interested in service learning should consider registering for SPN 126, which is the same level but with a service-learning component.

SPN 114 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the first course of Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers (SPN 114, 115 and 116) a combined basic and intermediate sequence for home-background speakers of Spanish who have had little or no previous formal study of the language. The course will help students further develop their communication skills while increasing the ability to improve their reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills as they explore and foster an appreciation of the Latino culture and heritage.

SPN 115 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the second course of Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers (SPN 114, 115 and 116) a combined basic and intermediate sequence for home-background speakers of Spanish who have had little or no previous formal study of the language. The course will help students further develop their communication skills while increasing the ability to improve their reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills as they explore and foster an appreciation of the Latino culture and heritage.

SPN 116 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS III | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is the third course of Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers (SPN 114, 115 and 116) a combined basic and intermediate sequence for home-background speakers of Spanish who have had little or no previous formal study of the language. The course will help students further develop their communication skills while increasing the ability to improve their reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills as they explore and foster an appreciation of the Latino culture and heritage.

SPN 124 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH l: SERVICE LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the service--earning version of SPN 104, the first course of the sequence of Intermediate Spanish. It covers all the same material but offers students the unique opportunity to enhance knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world both INSIDE and OUTSIDE the classroom. Students will spend 25 hours per quarter (3 hours/per week) working with one of several organizations in Chicago's Latino communities. These sites mostly serve new immigrants from Mexico and Central America who are in the process of integrating into new cultural environments. By participating in a language exchange on a weekly basis, the student will be an active learner and teacher. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 103 at DePaul (or equivalent), or who score 56-65 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207). SPN 104, 114, and 124 are equivalent courses.

SPN 125 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II: SERVICE LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the service-learning version of SPN 105, the second course of the sequence of Intermediate Spanish. It covers all the same material but offers students the unique opportunity to enhance knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world both INSIDE and OUTSIDE the classroom. Students will spend 25 hours per quarter (3 hours/per week) working with one of several organizations in Chicago's Latino communities. These sites mostly serve new immigrants from Mexico and Central America who are in the process of integrating into new cultural environments. By participating in a language exchange on a weekly basis, the student will be an active learner and teacher. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 104 at DePaul (or equivalent), or who score 66-74 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207). SPN 105, 115, and 125 are equivalent courses.

SPN 126 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH III: SERVICE LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the service-learning version of SPN 106, the third course of the sequence of Intermediate Spanish. It covers all the same material but offers students the unique opportunity to enhance knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world both INSIDE and OUTSIDE the classroom. Students will spend 25 hours per quarter (3 hours/per week) working with one of several organizations in Chicago's Latino communities. These sites mostly serve new immigrants from Mexico and Central America who are in the process of integrating into new cultural environments. By participating in a language exchange on a weekly basis, the student will be an active learner and teacher. This course is intended for students who have taken SPN 105 at DePaul (or equivalent), or who score 75-95 on the Spanish placement exam. This course is NOT appropriate for students who have non-classroom exposure to Spanish, such as from family or in the community; these students should enroll in a heritage Spanish course (SPN 114, 115, 200, or 205-207). SPN 106 and 126 are equivalent courses.

SPN 130 | MOLILSAP STUDY ABROAD | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is specially designed to complement the Modern Language Introductory Languages Study Abroad programs, linked to the third quarter of the first year language program. The course will be taught abroad.

SPN 146 | INTERMEDIATE MEDICAL SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course teaches students at the intermediate level the fundamentals of practical Spanish usage in medical situations involving Spanish-speaking patients in the U.S. Its goal is to facilitate intake of basic information and to set a foundation toward linguistic competence in Spanish with a focus on medical terminology. Cultural competence is an integral objective in language acquisition and is vital in our current health care setting. It will therefore inform all learning skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In this course, particular attention will be given to cultural understanding, speaking, and listening skills.

SPN 197 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

SPN 198 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

SPN 199 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

SPN 200 | TRANSITIONAL SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides transitional Spanish for intermediate Heritage Learners whose primary goal is to increase basic communication in the language and an expanded understanding of Hispanic culture. Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills continue to be developed with an emphasis on conversation, facilitated by the study of vocabulary and structure, exciting readings and films.

SPN 201 | ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this class students will work toward improving their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish at the advanced level as they explore various topics related to the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will also focus on four major grammar points that typically present a challenge for students of Spanish as a foreign language: the distinction between ser and estar, verb tense, verb aspect (preterite/imperfect), and verb mood (indicative/subjunctive). SPN 106 (or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor) is recommended. Heritage learners of Spanish at this level should take SPN 205 instead of SPN 201.

SPN 202 | ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students will work on improving their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish at the advanced level as they explore various topics related to the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will focus a little more, however, on written expression. Readings for the class will serve as models for various types of writing (primarily exposition and argumentation), and students will analyze the structure of these models as well as discuss their content. The course will also emphasize spelling, punctuation, and the effective use of the dictionary. SPN 106 (or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor) is recommended. Heritage learners of Spanish at this level should take SPN 206 instead of SPN 202.

SPN 203 | ADVANCED CONVERSATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on improving the student's oral skills in Spanish through intensive practice. Students will discuss a wide range of topics, and they will practice conversational strategies for a variety of situations. Upon completing this course, students should be able to do the following: 1) talk about the past in a coherent and fairly detailed manner; 2) deal effectively with unanticipated complications (e.g., a lost ticket); 3) adapt to formal and informal situations; 4) speak broadly on topics of personal interest; and 5) make themselves easily understood by Spanish speakers who are unaccustomed to dealing with non-native speakers. Class preparation will include readings (from various genres) and films. SPN 106 (or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor) is recommended. Heritage learners of Spanish at this level should take SPN 207 instead of SPN 203.

SPN 205 | ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the first in a series (SPN 205, SPN 206 and SPN 207) that offers a comprehensive, structural review of the Spanish language for heritage speakers. The course objectives include: 1) increasing the students' vocabulary in Spanish, 2) improving their reading and writing skills (students will read short stories and essays, and students will write guided compositions), 3) improving the students' oral proficiency (through presentations and discussions), and 4) exploring and fostering an appreciation of Latino culture and heritage. SPN 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

SPN 206 | ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is the first in a series (SPN 205, SPN 206 and SPN 207) that offers a comprehensive, structural review of the Spanish language for heritage speakers. The course objectives include: 1) increasing the students' vocabulary in Spanish, 2) improving their reading and writing skills (students will read short stories and essays, and students will write guided compositions), 3) improving the students' oral proficiency (through presentations and discussions), and 4) exploring and fostering an appreciation of Latino culture and heritage. SPN 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

SPN 207 | ADVANCED CONVERSATION FOR THE HERITAGE SPEAKER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Spanish 207 is the continuation of 205 and 206. It is the third part of a comprehensive, structural review of the Spanish language for heritage speakers' college students. The purpose of this course is to improve and polish the student's fluency in Spanish. The student's oral skills will be enhanced through careful and guided readings that will lead to open class discussions of fiction and nonfiction materials from around the Hispanic/Latino world. Students will be required to do a significant amount of reading, and writing in order to prepare themselves for class discussions and for their oral presentations. SPN 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

SPN 220 | INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY ANALYSIS IN SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The main purpose of this course is to provide students with the critical tools and vocabulary that they need in order to analyze various types of literary texts written in Spanish. Students will read and discuss a variety of poems, short stories, and plays, focusing on their various levels of meaning and also on the various ways by which they (or their authors or their readers) create meaning. Other aims of the course include helping students improve their oral and written communication in Spanish, introducing them to research methods in literary studies, and familiarizing them with the MLA style for documenting sources. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 221 | INTRODUCTION TO PENINSULAR CIVILIZATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the cultures of Spain and provides them with a panoramic view of peninsular civilization from ancient times to the present. Students will explore selected topics related to geography, language, politics, religion, literature, art, architecture, music, dance, and film. This course is a good preparation for those who plan to study in Spain. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 225 | INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL BASED APPROACHES TO TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the history, theory and fundamental principles of translation practice as well as the latest technologies available to the translator. Students will practice the art of translation through the newest technologies available in fields such as medicine, law, sports, travel, education, and business. This introductory course will train students to recognize, comprehend and translate idioms and fixed expressions into Spanish and/or English equivalencies. Students will learn to use monolingual dictionaries and constitute glossaries, computer-based tools and the internet for translating. Students will gain the necessary skills to proof and edit professional documents in order to provide polished and professional translations. A whole range of texts, videos from Spanish to English, and from English into Spanish, will be used for practice. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 242 | INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH LINGUISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to the structure of the Spanish language and its use in the Spanish speaking world. It is offered to those students who have already studied Spanish for at least two years. The objectives of this course are the following: (1) introduce basic linguistic terminology and the fundamentals of this science, (2) help the student to analyze the grammatical structures and sounds of the Spanish language, (3) familiarize the student with different varieties of Spanish, (4) introduce the student to the study of linguistics as a cognitive science. This course counts toward the major and minor in Spanish and prepares students for later linguistics courses. Strongly recommended for students planning to take any 300-level linguistics course. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 243 | INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the history, theory and fundamental principles of translation practice as well as the latest technologies available to the translator. This introductory course will train students to recognize, comprehend and translate idioms and fixed expressions into Spanish and/or English equivalencies. Students will learn to use monolingual dictionaries and glossaries, computer-based tools and the internet for translating. Students will gain the necessary skills to proof and edit professional documents in order to provide polished and professional translations. Different types of texts will be used to practice. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 244 | COMPUTER-ASSISTED TRANSLATION TOOLS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides an overview of computer-assisted translation (CAT) tools used in the field of translation. It will guide students to understand the difference between computer-assisted translation and machine translation. It will also analyze several Internet-based resources available to translators so that decisions to use these tools will be based on quality control and faithfulness to translation rather than on mere productivity and profit. This way, prospective translators will be able to choose best business practices and abide by professional ethics. This course has a significant hands-on component through which students will practice basic features of CAT tools, required of a translator in today's language service provider (LSP) environment. Students will learn new Spanish terminology related to business, technology, and other fields, as well as improve their grammar in the process. Class sessions will be in Spanish. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 251 | SPANISH FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course aims at developing communication skills for students, health care professionals (physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, social service workers) and workers in related fields. It reviews structures of Spanish grammar and introduces medical terms and expressions in the context of "real life" situations. Emphasis is given to developing cultural awareness of the U.S. Hispanic population and to preparing students to handle crises and daily concerns in a hospital or medical office setting and in other health care situations. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 252 | COMMERCIAL SPANISH I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

An introduction to Commercial Spanish designed to provide the business-oriented student with sufficient Spanish language skills to be able to conduct basic business activities in Spanish-speaking countries. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of vocabulary to help them explore various topics related to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. There will also be ample oral and written practice related to the business world. The ability to communicate and perform business-related tasks is the focus of each lesson. Classroom sessions will include oral presentations, discussions of the assigned readings and related topics. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 254 | SPANISH FOR LAW PROFESSIONALS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The objective of this course is to provide vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and cultural information for the specific needs of the professionals in the legal field. This class is intended for those who want to learn about the general content of law and legal vocabulary which are applicable in the Spanish world. In every class the participants will analyze texts, review grammar as necessary and practice in context. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 297 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

SPN 298 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

SPN 299 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

SPN 301 | SPANISH LITERATURE I : MIDDLE AGES THROUGH THE GOLDEN AGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the literature of medieval and Golden Age Spain, and to the basic philological and interpretative skills necessary to understand this literature. Students will read and analyze representative examples of the literary genres written in Castilian from 1100 CE to 1700 CE, tracing the development of various styles and their contribution to a national literary culture. The course gives special attention to recognizing and evaluating the cultural forces (such as aesthetic movements or linguistic norms), social structures (such as race, class, or gender), and economic or political circumstances engaged in particular texts. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 302 | SPANISH LITERATURE II: THE ENLIGHTENMENT TO THE PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A critical survey of Spanish peninsular literature from 1700 to the present: this course provides an overview of the historical, intellectual, artistic, and socio-political factors that have shaped Spanish life from the Enlightenment to our times as viewed through selected literary texts. (Literature category #2: Spanish literature from 1700 to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 303 | LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE & CULTURE I | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A critical survey of Spanish American literature from its origins to modernism. The course is an overview of the physical, intellectual, artistic, and socio-political currents of Spanish American literature that have helped to shape its thought and culture. Classroom sessions will include lectures and discussions of the assigned readings and related topics. Students in the course will read a number of representative works written by a diverse variety of the period's principal writers. Genres included are poetry, prose fiction, theater, and the essay. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 304 | LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a critical survey of Spanish American literature from 1880 to the present. It is an overview of the physical, intellectual, artistic, and socio-political currents of Spanish American literature that have helped to shape its thought and culture. Classroom sessions will include lectures and discussions of the assigned readings and related topics. Students in the course will read a number of representative works written by a diverse variety of the period's principal writers. The readings will provide a wide sample of different types of writing; genres included are poetry, prose fiction, theater, and the essay. (Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 305 | LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a survey of contemporary Latin American novels and will include works by a variety of Latin American authors. Throughout the course students will explore the development of the novel in Latin America; the revision and reinterpretation of history, gender, and the concept and construction of the novel and characters from the perspective of twentieth and twenty first century authors. (Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 306 | PUERTO RICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a panoramic study of the principal works and authors of Puerto Rican Literature from the Spanish colonial period to the present. The literary production of representative authors, such as Eugenio Maria de Hostos, Luisa Capetillo, Luis Rafael Sanchez, Ana Lydia Vega and Pedro Pietri among others, is studied and analyzed. We will take a thematic approach to the textual analysis of works by selected novelists, poets, musical artists, dramatists, essayists, and fiction writers and examine the rise of national society in Puerto Rico and the literary forms in which it finds articulated expression. Furthermore, we will evidence the evolution of nationality and the national through the various historical contexts including Spanish colonialism, United States occupation, and mass migration. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 307 | PENINSULAR CIVILIZATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an integrated survey of civilization and culture of the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. The survey course concentrates on Spanish arts and intellectual achievements. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 308 | MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to the literature of medieval Spain, and to the basic philological and interpretative skills necessary to understand this literature. Students will read and analyze representative examples of the poetry, prose, and drama written in Castilian from 1100 to 1500, tracing the gradual unification of a national language and literary culture. The course gives special attention to recognizing and evaluating the cultural forces (such as aesthetic movements or linguistic norms), social structures (such as race, class, or gender), and economic or political circumstances engaged in particular texts. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 309 | SPANISH BALLAD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore social diversity and the Spanish visions of Identity and Peninsular culture through the Spanish Ballad. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 310 | GOLDEN AGE POETRY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to the Spanish poetry of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, from Boscan and Garcilaso to Calderon and Sor Juana. The course will emphasize the major poetic movements, such as Petrarchism, misticism, conceptismo and culteranismo. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 311 | CERVANTES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course focuses on Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quijote. This course will consider how this "first modern novel" responds critically to developments in Renaissance literature, religious and political thinking, and theories of fictional and non-fictional representation. In addition to the Quijote, students will also read short selections of background material and criticism in order to situate this work in its historical context and to understand why it is considered to be among the most influential works of world literature. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 312 | THE SPANISH NOVEL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course is a survey of modern and contemporary Spanish novels and will include works by a variety of authors. Throughout the course students will explore the development of the novel in Spain; the revision and reinterpretation of history, gender, and the concept and construction of the novel and characters from the perspective of modern and contemporary authors. Group work, class discussions and individual projects will help the student gain a comprehensive view of the significant currents of the Spanish peninsular novel. This course will stress and encourage the examination of the roles of women, class, culture, and religion. (Literature category #2: Spanish literature from the Enlightenment to the present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 313 | THE GENERATION OF 1898 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course will focus on the key group of Spanish writers known as the Generation of 1898. These writers felt that Spain at the end of the 19th century did not measure up to European standards of modernity and progress, and that its cultural and social life was at an inferior level when compared to the leading European countries. Spain was diagnosed as having a national malaise known as "abulia"; it was a kind of national sluggishness that prevented the country from profiting from and adjusting to the rapidly changing currents of modern world civilization. The task facing the Generation of 1898 was to bring Spain up to the level of the times. Students in the course will read a number of representative works written by some of the Generation's principal members. (Literature category #2: Spanish literature from the Enlightenment to the present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 314 | CONTEMPORARY HISPANIC LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a panoramic study of principal works and authors of literature of the Spanish-speaking world. Topics vary. The literary production of representative authors is studied and analyzed. Students will take a thematic approach to the textual analysis of works by selected poets, musical artists, dramatists, essayists and fiction writers. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from the origins through Romanticism or Literature category #4 Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 315 | MEXICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an overview of Mexican literature from the colonial period to the present. Through writings, films, arts, and music, the course explores the intellectual, political, social, and historical events that have shaped the life and experience of Mexican people. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Mexican Revolution and the post Revolution, as well as the U.S. presence in Mexico and Mexicans in the United States. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism or Literature category #4 Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 316 | THE HISPANIC ESSAY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course will explore the history of ideas, cultural diversity and Latin American visions of identity through the Latin American essays. In this class students will decode and analyzed problems of theory, criticism and study of this genre. Through the works of a selection of authors, such as Eduardo Galeano, Octavio Paz, Jose Marti, Manuel Gonzalez Prada and others, this class will study how political, social, economical, rhetorical and gender issues have affected this genre. Students will examine issues such as the construction of power, the treatment of sex, gender and cultural difference in literature; how the Latin American experience is reflected in these readings; and how they contribute to Hispanic literature as a whole. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism or Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 317 | THE HISPANIC SHORT STORY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the Hispanic short story from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latino short story. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 318 | THE HISPANIC THEATER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores Hispanic theater from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Through the discussion and analysis of theatrical texts, students will improve their knowledge of Hispanic culture, socio-political vision, and tools of literary expression. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latino theater. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 319 | CONTEMPORARY POETRY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course in modern Latin American and Spanish literature focuses on poetical representations of identity; poetical representations of gender and the cultural readings of "machismo"; the role of poetry and other forms of artistic expression in shaping societies; theory and critical analysis of poems as a way to understand culture, the politics of marginality and forms of political mobilization among other issues. (Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present or Literature category #2: Spanish literature from the Enlightenment to the present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 320 | COMMERCIAL SPANISH II | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a course designed to provide the business-oriented student with sufficient Spanish language skills to be able to function credibly in a business environment where a knowledge of Spanish is necessary. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of commercial terminology and will have ample oral and written practice related to the business world. Principal topics include: 1) readings on business topics, translation, writing; 2) study and practice of business vocabulary; 3) study and discussion of business topics; 4) readings on Spanish-speaking countries and their people and economies to provide the students with an increased awareness of the diversity and complexity of the cultures and business practices in the many different countries in Latin America and other Spanish-speaking areas. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 321 | U.S. LATINO/A WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course is a critical survey of Latino literature. This course will provide the student with an overview (cultural, social, and political) of the contributions of Latinos to the development of society in the United States. The course will call attention to topics that are and have been important to Latino culture and identity. Particular emphasis will be given to topics such as: oppression, isolation, cultural identity (within the U.S.), education and anti-immigrant issues. The objective of this course is to provide the student with a better understanding of the Latino communities in the United States, as seen by themselves. Through the works read in class, films and music the student will also acquire a better understanding of the social and political situation of Latinos in the United States. Literature category #4 (Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 322 | HISPANIC WOMEN WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course explores Hispanic women writers from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latina writers of the United States. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 323 | REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course explores Revolution in Latin American literature from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: The Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, Revolutions in Central America, or a Survey of Revolutionary Movements. (Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 324 | THE BIRTH OF THE NOVEL IN SPAIN | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this advanced course students will read and discuss examples of the major sixteenth-century narrative genres (chivalric romance, prose drama, picaresque, pastoral, la novela morisca, and historiography) that paved the way for Cervantes's synthesis. Texts include, Amadis de Gaula (selections), La Celestina, El Abencerraje, La vida de Lazarillo de Tormes, and two of Cervantes's novellas. Topics to be treated include questions of social class and caste, gender roles, notions of love and honor, the rise of the modern nation-state, imperialism, mysticism, verisimilitude, literal and figurative language, and the problems associated with interpreting texts that are culturally distant from modern readers. Class will consist primarily of discussion of the assigned readings. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 325 | ADVANCED SPANISH TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will focus on the translation of journalistic, legal, literary, pedagogical and commercial texts. The course will also improve the student's knowledge of translation and interpretation theory and provide, through a variety of translation assignments, the opportunity to review their writing skills and knowledge of the culture in order to be able to work within different registers and learn appropriate vocabulary. Guest lectures may provide the students with first- hand experience in the field and the opportunity to explore possible future use of their experience in translation. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 326 | SPANISH STYLISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced expression class builds on the skills developed in Spanish 201 & 202 (or 205 & 206) with a clear emphasis on writing. Students will write numerous texts of different length and purpose. The focus will be on developing a more effective and sophisticated prose style. In-class time will be spent on writing activities which will give students practice in performing specific writing tasks following a variety of writing styles. In-class time will also be spent on oral and written exercises designed to reinforce the correct use of grammatical structures. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 327 | AREA STUDIES IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores Area Studies in Latin American literature from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Central American, Andean, or Southern Cone literature. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism or Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 328 | MODERN LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores Modern Latin American theatre from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: a survey of representative dramas from the "revolutionary" period in modern Latin American theater, 1960s-1970s or other specialized topics. (Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 329 | LATINO GAY AND LESBIAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores Latino gay and lesbian literature from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: a survey of representative texts of Latino and Hispanic gay and lesbian authors or other specialized topics. (Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 9or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 330 | LATIN AMERICAN, LATINO AND SPANISH CINEMA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores Latin American, Latino and/or Peninsular cinema from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latino film directors and their works in Spain, Latin America or the United States. Students will also learn vocabulary and techniques for analyzing the formal aspects of film as well as film narrative. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 331 | FILM AS A SUBVERSIVE ART | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores contested images of resistance in Latin American, Latino and/or Peninsular films from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. The course questions the construction of individual and collective identities in film, focusing on the intersections of cultural factors such as gender, race and ethnicity, social class, and language, among others. It also examines the ideological underpinnings involved in the shaping and conforming of those identities by cultural institutions and social systems. Variable topics may include: Decoding literature through Peninsular, Latin American or Latino films based on literary works by Peninsular, Latin American or Latino authors, or other specialized topics. Students will also learn vocabulary and techniques for analyzing the formal aspects of film as well as film narrative. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 332 | NINETEENTH-CENTURY SPANISH NOVEL | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course is based on the reading, discussion and critique of major representative works in nineteenth-century Peninsular novel. The course will focus on the conflicting interest of nineteenth-century society paying special attention to the theme of marriage and relationship between sexes. This course will stress and encourage the examination of the roles of women, class, culture, and religion. (Literature category #2: Spanish literature from the Enlightenment to the present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 333 | GOLDEN AGE THEATER | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course will introduce students to the Spanish theater of the seventeenth century, with a focus on the comedia, a new popular art form that appealed to audiences across social classes. Students will endeavor to read these literary works in their cultural contexts and consider their current relevance. Students may also view film adaptations of some of the plays. Topics include questions of class and caste, gender roles, various notions of honor, the early modern monarchy, the idea of free will within the context of the Counter Reformation, and the theatrical elements of everyday life. Class will consist primarily of discussion of the assigned readings. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 334 | ADVANCED TRANSLATION IN THE PROFESSIONAL WORLD: COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is an advanced course with practical experience designed to bring translation knowledge and skills together to produce accurate and clear translations from English into Spanish and vice versa. Students will review fundamental translation theories and applications of written texts in various disciplines. They will acquire the skills and knowledge needed to ensure contextually-accurate terminology in the preparation of translated documents. Additionally, they will maintain the standards of the ethical code formulated by the American Translators Association, (ATA) Students will be exposed to the most modern online translation technology available, computer assisted translation (CAT) tools that supplement classroom learning with user-friendly online exercises of technical vocabulary designed to reinforce translation skills. Students will participate in a Community--Based Service Learning (CBL) for 25 hours per quarter, where they will help to produce "translations in progress" for local business and non- profit organizations that require translation services. As a final project, students will create a translation portfolio, which is composed of a reflection paper of the CBL experience, translation projects, curriculum vitae, and a cover letter. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 335 | U.S. LATINA WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a survey of literature by modern Latina women writers from the United States, focusing on the social, cultural and political development of Latinas and their affirmation and reaffirmation of identity through their literature in today's society. (Literature category #4: Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 339 | THE GENERATION OF 1927 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course examines the peninsular Spanish "Generation of 1927" in considerable depth with emphasis on the best known literary figure in the group, Federico Garcia Lorca. (Literature category #2: Spanish literature from the Enlightenment to the present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 340 | SPANISH CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course seeks to reinforce and further develop the student's expression in Spanish by exploring different techniques in writing poetry and fiction. After approaching some basic concepts involved in the creative writing process, and with the constant practice of writing, students will be able to create texts in the style of preference. They will also gain more confidence with linguistics abilities. This class will be conducted in a workshop format, consisting of in-class writing exercises, workshop-like peer-sharing of texts, and discussions about the creative process. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 351 | SPANISH IN THE U.S. | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Spanish is the second most widely spoken language in the United States; it has been spoken in this country longer than English has. This course is an introduction to the varieties of Spanish spoken in the US. Students will examine the evolution of the phonological, grammatical, and lexical linguistic system of the Spanish of US Latino/a communities. Students will also explore how sociolinguistic concepts such as bilingualism, diglossia, code-switching, linguistic variation, linguistic change, standard vs. non-prestigious varieties, and language attitudes manifest in the US Spanish context. This course is intended to familiarize the students with issues of language use in social context. Students will discuss results of research on the relationship between language and society in US Spanish-speaking communities. They will become familiar with sociolinguistic concepts. Students also acquire experience in carrying out sociolinguistic research. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 352 | SPANISH PHONOLOGY AND PHONETICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is an introductory course on the nature and structure of the sound system of the Spanish language. This course is offered to students who, having studied the language for at least two years, need a solid grounding of Spanish phonology and--in the case of non-native speakers of Spanish--a systematic practice of correct pronunciation patterns. It is also a requirement for Spanish majors. After a thorough study of the Spanish sound system, students will explore some related topics such as Spanish orthography, the history of the Spanish language, its place among Romance, Iberian, and American languages, and its rich dialectal variation. Lectures and discussions will be based on the required textbook and on additional materials (both written and audio). This class will be conducted in Spanish. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 353 | THE STRUCTURE OF SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of the structure of language, with a special emphasis on Spanish. It examines the structure of sentences (syntax), the formation of words (morphology), and the construction of meaning (semantics/pragmatics) in Spanish, and in contrast to English and other languages. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 354 | SPANISH SOCIOLINGUISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is an introduction to the study of the relationship between language and society through the Spanish varieties in the Spanish-speaking world. Students will examine and revise ideologies, attitudes and beliefs about the Spanish language to understand this relationship. To lead students to examine their own beliefs and attitudes about language, they will be equipped with methods of linguistic analyses and strategies to find the social in the linguistic and the linguistic in the social from a critical perspective. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 355 | THE HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a journey through the history of the Spanish language from Latin to the present day. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 356 | BILINGUALISM IN THE SPANISH-SPEAKING WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course examines bilingualism in the Spanish-speaking world in society and in individuals. At the societal level, it discusses the distribution of languages in contact with Spanish throughout the world and the social and political factors that affect language use, acquisition and maintenance, including language policy and bilingual education. At the individual level, it discusses first and second language acquisition and bilingual language processing and use, including code-switching and other linguistic features resulting from language contact. This class will be conducted in Spanish. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 370 | LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course will explore the politics, social structures, traditions, artistic movements and historical periods of Latin America. The scope of the course covers the main pre-Columbian civilizations, the time of the Spanish discovery and colonization, the rise of new nationalities and their development, especially in relation to the United States and the emerging globalized world. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 371 | CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND LEGACIES THROUGH FILM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores Latin American, Latino and/or Peninsular cultures which grapple with various historical, socio-economic and political issues through film. Throughout the course, students will question the construction of individual and collective identities in film, focusing on the intersections of cultural factors such as gender, race and ethnicity, social class, and language, among others. Students will also focus on the ideological substructures involved in the shaping and conforming of those identities by cultural institutions and social systems. Students will also learn vocabulary and techniques for analyzing the formal aspects of film as well as film narrative. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 372 | LITERATURE OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course will explore cultural diversity and the Dominican Republic political, gender and ethnic visions through poetry. Through poetic class experience students will decode culture and society in the Caribbean and U.S. Dominican Latino communities. Students will focus on the following issues: political representations of identity; representations of gender and the cultural readings of "machismo"; the role of art and other forms of cultural expression in shaping identity; cultural criticism of poems as a way to understand culture and the politics of marginality and forms of political mobilization. Literature category #4 (Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 373 | AFRO-HISPANIC LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course in contemporary literature will seek to determine what distinguishes the Afro-Hispanic novel, short story, drama or poetry from other works in these genres written in Spanish. Students will read original works in order to analyze how the use of language, imagery and narrative voice reflect the experience of people of African descent in the Spanish-speaking world as seen (or heard) in the text and context of these works. In addition, students will explore how race, class, politics and culture interact and find expression in Afro-Hispanic literature. (Literature category #2: Spanish literature from the Enlightenment to the present or Literature category #4: Latin America from Modernism to the present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 374 | LITERATURE OF THE CONQUEST | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course in Latin American literature explores the early encounters between Europe and the Americas. Students will analyze letters, reports, histories, and political tracts from European, Amerindian, and Mestizo sources. Students will also consider some visual documents, such as images from the Lienzo de Tlaxcala and early maps. Typical areas of focus include the initial contact (Columbus), Mexico (Cortes, Diaz del Castillo, the Florentine Codex), Peru (Xerez, "El Inca" Garcilaso, Guaman Poma de Ayala), and the sixteenth-century debates over the wars of conquest (Las Casas, Sepulveda). Topics include the role of these texts as instruments of empire, strategies of representation, strategies of resistance to imperialism, the role of women in the conquest, debates over what constitutes a "just" war, and the relevance of these texts for modern Latin American identities. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 375 | LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM INDEPENDENCE TO MODERNISM | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course in Spanish literature will introduce students to the most important literary movements in Hispanic American countries, beginning with the wars of independence from Spain until the last part of 19th century. Special attention will be given to authors such as Jose Marti, Jorge Issacs, Andres Bello and Ruben Dario, among others. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 376 | SOR JUANA INES DE LA CRUZ | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course in literature will explore the main works of the most influential Mexican poet of the Colonial period, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz (1648-1695). One of the major themes in Sor Juana's work is the right of women to education. Sor Juana wrote poetry, plays, and essays in seventeenth-century Mexico, a society in which women's intellectual inquiry and access to knowledge was an unsafe endeavor and controlled by patriarchal hierarchies. Students will examine the relationship between politics, gender and writing in the context of the historical period, and analyze the spaces and borders occupied and visited by Sor Juana's lyric, ludic, astronomical, polemical, theatrical, theological, cosmological, culinary, colonial, and criollo writings. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 377 | PERUVIAN REALITIES IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY: HISTORY, CULTURE, POLITICS, VIOLENCE & SOCIAL JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the history, culture, politics, and general life of the peoples of Peru. Through an exploration of a vast array of interdisciplinary readings, visual arts and films, students will gain a deep understanding of Peru's history from its extraordinary pre-Columbian civilizations to its citizens' twenty-first century post civil war struggles to achieve dignity and justice in a multicultural, multilingual and multiethnic nation where Andean, Amazonian, African, Asian and European traditions meet. As a consequence of immense economic and social inequalities, Peru has a long history of violence that resulted in an internal war that ended recently. Particular attention will be given to contemporary developments in terms of the interaction between culture and politics. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism or Literature category #4 (Latin American literature from Modernism to present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 378 | FOUNDATIONAL FICTIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This advanced course in Latin American literature explores the relationship of national consolidation and romantic novels. This course is based on the reading, discussion and critique of major representative "Foundational Fictions" in 19th-century Latin American literature. Students will examine how the construction of gender and race in these novels portrays the quest to forge new national identities. At the same time, students will analyze how the novels use their characters' romantic relationships to suggest their nation's political relationships, and thus contribute to the discourse on building the new societies that would replace Spain's colonial empire and serve as a prototype for the modern Latin American state. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 391 | SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF HERITAGE LANGUAGE LITERACY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

A heritage language learner has been described as "a student who is raised in a home where a non-English language is spoken, who speaks or merely understands the heritage language, and who is to some degree bilingual in English and the heritage language" (Valdes 2000:1). It is well-documented that for such students, literacy in the heritage language is often lost within just one or two generations. In this third course of DePaul's series on Latino Literacy, students will identify the prominent sociolinguistic issues that intersect with heritage language literacy. Through the reading of selected bibliography and guided reflections on both personal and service learning experiences, each student will arrive at a personalized assessment of the key topics affecting heritage language literacy. Possible topics include language socialization, language ideology and identities, and issues related to language contact with English such as code-switching and language shift/loss. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 392 | TRANSNATIONALISM AND SOCIAL JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores the overarching theme of violence across different Latin American social realities. This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore the experience of revolution and repression in contemporary Latin America. Focusing on twentieth-century literature, films and culture, students will explore the making and unmaking of revolutionary political projects and human rights issues, the construction of distinct forms of cultural resistance and the different expressions of violence. (Literature category #4: Latin America from Modernism to the present). One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 393 | LATINO MEDIA AND DIGITAL CULTURE LITERACY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore the role and impact of the media in the Latino community, and how, in this context, Latinos view themselves and how others view them. Students will explore Latino communities' participation as creators and consumers of popular and media culture. Students will examine media organizations and their participants in their role in shaping popular culture. Finally, students will study the various ways that Latino communities exercise cultural citizenship as a form of resistance and in their struggle for just representation in an increasingly global society. This is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate inter-disciplinary seminar that draws on readings in cultural economy, political economy, cultural studies, history and sociology. Students who choose to take the class for JYEL credit are required to do a minimum of 25 hours of service. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 394 | LATINO CULTURAL LITERACY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course explores local Chicago histories and institutions and their engagement in politics and advocacy for Latinos. This is a Junior Year Experiential Learning (JRYR) course, and as such requires 25 hours of service. One of the following courses recommended: SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 205 or SPN 206 (or equivalent or permission of instructor).

SPN 395 | FOREIGN LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The two credit FLAC course allows students to enrich their experience in the co-required course through added reading, writing, listening and speaking activities in Spanish. Students must have the equivalent of 106 or higher ability in Spanish to take this two credit component. Please contact the Department of Modern Languages if you have questions about this courses or about language placement.

SPN 397 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

SPN 398 | STUDY ABROAD | 1-8 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

SPN 399 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 1-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Variable credit.

SPN 401 | SPANISH LITERATURE I : MIDDLE AGES THROUGH THE GOLDEN AGE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to the literature of medieval and Golden Age Spain, and to the basic philological and interpretative skills necessary to understand this literature. Students will read and analyze representative examples of the literary genres written in Castilian from 1100 CE to 1700 CE, tracing the development of various styles and their contribution to a national literary culture. The course gives special attention to recognizing and evaluating the cultural forces (such as aesthetic movements or linguistic norms), social structures (such as race, class, or gender), and economic or political circumstances engaged in particular texts. (Literature category #1: Spanish literature before 1700).

SPN 402 | SPANISH LITERATURE II: THE ENLIGHTENMENT TO THE PRESENT | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a critical survey of Spanish peninsular literature from 1700 to the present and provides an overview of the historical, intellectual, artistic, and socio-political factors that have shaped Spanish life from the Enlightenment to our times as viewed through selected literary texts. (Literature category #2: Spanish literature before 1700).

SPN 403 | LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE & CULTURE I | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a critical survey of Spanish American literature from its origins to modernism. It is an overview of the physical, intellectual, artistic, and socio-political currents of Spanish American literature that have helped to shape its thought and culture. Classroom sessions will include lectures and discussions of the assigned readings and related topics. Students in the course will read a number of representative works written by a diverse variety of the period's principal writers. The readings will provide a wide sample of different types of writing; genres included are poetry, prose fiction, theater, and the essay. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism).

SPN 404 | LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a critical survey of Spanish American literature from 1880 to the present. It is an overview of the physical, intellectual, artistic, and socio-political currents of Spanish American literature that have helped to shape its thought and culture. Classroom sessions will include lectures and discussions of the assigned readings and related topics. Students in the course will read a number of representative works written by a diverse variety of the period's principal writers. The readings will provide a wide sample of different types of writing; genres included are poetry, prose fiction, theater, and the essay.

SPN 405 | LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a survey of contemporary Latin American novels and will include works by a variety of Latin American authors. Throughout the course students will explore the development of the novel in Latin America; the revision and reinterpretation of history, gender, and the concept and construction of the novel; and characters from the perspective of twentieth and twenty first century authors.

SPN 406 | HISPANIC LITERATURE OF THE CARIBBEAN | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course covers Hispanic literature of the Caribbean from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican or Afro-Caribbean Literature.

SPN 407 | PENINSULAR CIVILIZATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an integrated survey of civilization and culture of the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. The survey course concentrates on Spanish arts and intellectual achievements.

SPN 408 | MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to the literature of medieval Spain, and to the basic philological and interpretative skills necessary to understand this literature. Students will read and analyze representative examples of the poetry, prose, and drama written in Castilian from 1100 to 1500, tracing the gradual unification of a national language and literary culture. The course gives special attention to recognizing and evaluating the cultural forces (such as aesthetic movements or linguistic norms), social structures (such as race, class, or gender), and economic or political circumstances engaged in particular texts.

SPN 409 | SPANISH BALLAD | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will explore social diversity and the Spanish visions of Identity and Peninsular culture through the Spanish Ballad.

SPN 410 | GOLDEN AGE POETRY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course introduces students to the poetry of Golden Age Spain (1500-1700), and to the basic philological and interpretative skills necessary to understand this literature. Students will read and analyze representative examples of the poetry written in Castilian from 1500 to 1700, tracing the development of major styles and their contribution to a national literary culture. The course gives special attention to recognizing and evaluating the cultural forces (such as aesthetic movements or linguistic norms), social structures (such as race, class, or gender), and economic or political circumstances engaged in particular texts.

SPN 411 | CERVANTES | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course focuses on Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quijote. This course will consider how this "first modern novel" responds critically to developments in Renaissance literature, religious and political thinking, and theories of fictional and non-fictional representation. In addition to the Quijote, students will also read short selections of background material and criticism in order to situate this work in its historical context and to understand why it is considered to be among the most influential works of world literature.

SPN 412 | THE SPANISH NOVEL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course is a survey of modern and contemporary Spanish novels and will include works by a variety of authors. Throughout the course students will explore the development of the novel in Spain; the revision and reinterpretation of history, gender, and the concept and construction of the novel and characters from the perspective of modern and contemporary authors. Group work, class discussions and individual projects will help the student to gain a comprehensive view of the significant currents of the Spanish peninsular novel. This course will stress and encourage the examination of the roles of women, class, culture, and religion.

SPN 413 | THE GENERATION OF 1898 | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course will focus on the key group of Spanish writers known as the Generation of 1898. These writers felt that Spain at the end of the 19th century did not measure up to European standards of modernity and progress, and that its cultural and social life was at an inferior level when compared to the leading European countries. Spain was diagnosed as having a national malaise known as "abulia"; it was a kind of national sluggishness that prevented the country from profiting from and adjusting to the rapidly changing currents of modern world civilization. The task facing the Generation of 1898 was to bring Spain up to the level of the times. Students in the course will read a number of representative works written by some of the Generation's principal members.

SPN 414 | CONTEMPORARY HISPANIC LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a panoramic study of the principal works and authors of literature from Spanish-speaking countries. The literary production of representative authors is studied and analyzed. Students will take a thematic approach to the textual analysis of works by selected poets, musical artists, dramatists, essayists and fiction writers.

SPN 415 | MEXICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an overview of Mexican literature from the colonial period to the present. Through writings, films, arts, and music, the course explores the intellectual, political, social, and historical events that have shaped the life and experience of Mexican people. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Mexican Revolution and the post Revolution, as well as the U.S. presence in Mexico and Mexicans in the United States.

SPN 416 | THE HISPANIC ESSAY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course will explore the history of ideas, cultural diversity and Latin American visions of identity through the Latin American essays. In this class students will decode and analyzed problems of theory, criticism and study of this genre. Through the works of a selection of authors, such as Eduardo Galeano, Octavio Paz, Jose Marti, Manuel Gonzalez Prada and others, this class will study how political, social, economical, rhetorical and gender issues have affected this genre. Students will examine issues such as the construction of power, the treatment of sex, gender and cultural difference in literature; how the Latin American experience is reflected in these readings; and how they contribute to Hispanic literature as a whole.

SPN 417 | THE HISPANIC SHORT STORY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores the Hispanic short story from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latino short story.

SPN 418 | THE HISPANIC THEATER | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores Hispanic theater from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Through the discussion and analysis of theatrical texts, students will improve their knowledge of Hispanic culture, socio-political vision, and tools of literary expression. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latino theater.

SPN 419 | CONTEMPORARY POETRY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course in modern Latin American and Spanish literature focuses on the following issues: poetical representations of identity; poetical representations of gender and the cultural readings of "machismo"; the role of poetry and other forms of artistic expression in shaping societies; theory and critical analysis of poems as a way to understand culture, the politics of marginality and forms of political mobilization among other issues.

SPN 420 | COMMERCIAL SPANISH II | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Advanced Commercial Spanish is designed to provide the business-oriented student with sufficient Spanish language skills to be able to function credibly in a business environment where a knowledge of Spanish is necessary. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of commercial terminology and will have ample oral and written practice related to the business world.

SPN 421 | U.S. LATINO/A WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course is a critical survey of Latino literature. This course will provide the student with an overview (cultural, social, and political) of the contributions of Latinos to the development of society in the United States. The course will call attention to topics that are and have been important to Latino culture and identity. Particular emphasis will be given to topics such as: oppression, isolation, cultural identity (within the U.S.), education and anti-immigrant issues. The objective of this course is to provide the student with a better understanding of the Latino communities in the United States, as seen by themselves. Through the works read in class, films and music the student will also acquire a better understanding of the social and political situation of Latinos in the United States.

SPN 422 | HISPANIC WOMEN WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course explores Hispanic women writers from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latina writers of the United States.

SPN 423 | REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course explores Revolution in Latin American literature from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: The Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, Revolutions in Central America, or a Survey of Revolutionary Movements.

SPN 424 | THE BIRTH OF THE NOVEL IN SPAIN | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The Birth of the Novel in Spain" is an advanced course in Spanish literature (category #1: Spanish literature before 1700). Students will read and discuss examples of the major sixteenth-century narrative genres (chivalric romance, prose drama, picaresque, pastoral, la novela morisca, and historiography) that paved the way for Cervantes's synthesis. Texts include, Amadis de Gaula (selections), La Celestina, El Abencerraje, La vida de Lazarillo de Tormes, and two of Cervantes's novelas ejemplares. Topics to be treated include questions of social class and caste, gender roles, notions of love and honor, the rise of the modern nation-state, imperialism, mysticism, verisimilitude, literal and figurative language, and the problems associated with interpreting texts that are culturally distant from modern readers. Class will consist primarily of discussion of the assigned readings.

SPN 425 | ADVANCED SPANISH TRANSLATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will focus on the translation of journalistic, legal, literary, pedagogical and commercial texts. The course will also improve the student's knowledge of translation and interpretation theory and provide, through a variety of translation assignments, the opportunity to review their writing skills and knowledge of the culture in order to be able to work within different registers and learn appropriate vocabulary. Guest lectures may provide the students with first- hand experience in the field and the opportunity to explore possible future use of their experience in translation.

SPN 426 | SPANISH STYLISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced expression class has a clear emphasis on writing numerous texts of different length and purpose. The focus will be on developing a more effective and sophisticated prose style. In-class time will be spent on writing activities which will give students practice in performing specific writing tasks following a variety of writing styles. In-class time will also be spent on oral and written exercises designed to reinforce the correct use of grammatical structures.

SPN 427 | AREA STUDIES IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores Area Studies in Latin American literature from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Central American, Andean, or Southern Cone literature.

SPN 428 | MODERN LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores Modern Latin American theatre from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: a survey of representative dramas from the "revolutionary" period in modern Latin American theater, 1960s-1970s or other specialized topics.

SPN 429 | LATINO GAY AND LESBIAN LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores Latino gay and lesbian literature from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: a survey of representative texts of Latino and Hispanic gay and lesbian authors or other specialized topics.

SPN 430 | LATIN AMERICAN, LATINO AND SPANISH CINEMA | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores Latin American, Latino and/or Peninsular cinema from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. Variable topics may include: Peninsular, Latin American or Latino film directors and their works in Spain, Latin America or the United States. Students will also learn vocabulary and techniques for analyzing the formal aspects of film as well as film narrative.

SPN 431 | FILM AS A SUBVERSIVE ART | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores contested images of resistance in Latin American, Latino and/or Peninsular films from a variety of perspectives and may have different topics each quarter. The course questions the construction of individual and collective identities in film, focusing on the intersections of cultural factors such as gender, race and ethnicity, social class, and language, among others. It also examines the ideological underpinnings involved in the shaping and conforming of those identities by cultural institutions and social systems. Variable topics may include: Decoding literature through Peninsular, Latin American or Latino films based on literary works by Peninsular, Latin American or Latino authors, or other specialized topics. Students will also learn vocabulary and techniques for analyzing the formal aspects of film as well as film narrative.

SPN 432 | NINETEENTH-CENTURY SPANISH NOVEL | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course is based on the reading, discussion and critique of major representative works in nineteenth-century Peninsular novel. The course will focus on the conflicting interest of nineteenth-century society paying special attention to the theme of marriage and relationship between sexes. This course will stress and encourage the examination of the roles of women, class, culture, and religion.

SPN 433 | GOLDEN AGE THEATER | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course will introduce students to the Spanish theater of the seventeenth century, with a focus on the comedia, a new popular art form that appealed to audiences across social classes. Students will endeavor to read these literary works in their cultural contexts and consider their current relevance. Students may also view film adaptations of some of the plays. Topics include questions of class and caste, gender roles, various notions of honor, the early modern monarchy, the idea of free will within the context of the Counter Reformation, and the theatrical elements of everyday life. Class will consist primarily of discussion of the assigned readings.

SPN 434 | ADVANCED TRANSLATION IN THE PROFESSIONAL WORLD: COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE LEARNING | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is an advanced course with practical experience designed to bring translation knowledge and skills together to produce accurate and clear translations from English into Spanish and vice versa. Students will review fundamental translation theories and applications of written texts in various disciplines. They will acquire the skills and knowledge needed to ensure contextually-accurate terminology in the preparation of translated documents. Additionally, they will maintain the standards of the ethical code formulated by the American Translators Association, (ATA) Students will be exposed to the most modern online translation technology available, computer assisted translation (CAT) tools that supplement classroom learning with user-friendly online exercises of technical vocabulary designed to reinforce translation skills. Students will participate in a Community--Based Service Learning (CBL) for 25 hours per quarter, where they will help to produce "translations in progress" for local business and non- profit organizations that require translation services. As a final project, students will create a translation portfolio, which is composed of a reflection paper of the CBL experience, translation projects, curriculum vitae, and a cover letter. SPN 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended. Cross-listed with SPN 334.

SPN 435 | U.S. LATINA WRITERS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a survey of literature by modern Latina women writers from the United States, focusing on the social, cultural and political development of Latinas and their affirmation and reaffirmation of identity through their literature in today's society.

SPN 439 | THE GENERATION OF 1927 | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course examines the peninsular Spanish "Generation of 1927" in considerable depth with emphasis on the best known literary figure in the group, Federico Garcia Lorca.

SPN 440 | SPANISH CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course seeks to reinforce and further develop the student's expression in Spanish by exploring different techniques in writing poetry and fiction. After approaching some basic concepts involved in the creative writing process, and with the constant practice of writing, students will be able to create texts in the style of preference. They will also gain more confidence with linguistics abilities. This class will be conducted in a workshop format, consisting of in-class writing exercises, workshop-like peer-sharing of texts, and discussions about the creative process.

SPN 451 | SPANISH IN THE U.S. | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Spanish is the second most widely spoken language in the United States; it has been spoken in this country longer than English has. This course is an introduction to the varieties of Spanish spoken in the US. Students will examine the evolution of the phonological, grammatical, and lexical linguistic system of the Spanish of US Latino/a communities. Students will also explore how sociolinguistic concepts such as bilingualism, diglossia, code-switching, linguistic variation, linguistic change, standard vs. non- prestigious varieties, language attitudes, manifest in the US Spanish context. This course is intended to familiarize the students with issues of language use in social context. Students will discuss results of research on the relationship between language and society in US Spanish-speaking communities. They will become familiar with sociolinguistic concepts. Students also acquire experience in carrying out sociolinguistic research. SPN 242 strongly recommended.

SPN 452 | SPANISH PHONOLOGY AND PHONETICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is an introductory course on the nature and structure of the sound system of the Spanish language. This course is offered to students who, having studied the language for at least two years, need a solid grounding of Spanish phonology and--in the case of non-native speakers of Spanish--a systematic practice of correct pronunciation patterns. It is also a requirement for Spanish majors. After a thorough study of the Spanish sound system, students will explore some related topics such as Spanish orthography, the history of the Spanish language, its place among Romance, Iberian, and American languages, and its rich dialectal variation. Lectures and discussions will be based on the required textbook and on additional materials (both written and audio). This class will be conducted in Spanish.

SPN 453 | THE STRUCTURE OF SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of the structure of language, with a special emphasis on Spanish. It examines the structure of sentences (syntax), the formation of words (morphology), and the construction of meaning (semantics/pragmatics) in Spanish, and in contrast to English and other languages.

SPN 454 | SPANISH SOCIOLINGUISTICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is an introduction to the study of the relationship between language and society through the Spanish varieties in the Spanish-speaking world. Students will examine and revise ideologies, attitudes and beliefs about the Spanish language to understand this relationship. To lead students to examine their own beliefs and attitudes about language, they will be equipped with methods of linguistic analyses and strategies to find the social in the linguistic and the linguistic in the social from a critical perspective.

SPN 455 | THE HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is a journey through the history of the Spanish language from Latin to the present day.

SPN 456 | BILINGUALISM IN THE SPANISH-SPEAKING WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course examines bilingualism in the Spanish-speaking world in society and in individuals. At the societal level, it discusses the distribution of languages in contact with Spanish throughout the world and the social and political factors that affect language use, acquisition and maintenance, including language policy and bilingual education. At the individual level, it discusses first and second language acquisition and bilingual language processing and use, including code-switching and other linguistic features resulting from language contact. This class will be conducted in Spanish. SPN 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

SPN 470 | LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The course will explore the politics, social structures, traditions, artistic movements and historical periods of Latin America. The scope of the course covers the main pre-Columbian civilizations, the time of the Spanish discovery and colonization, the rise of new nationalities and their development, especially in relation to the United States and the emerging globalized world.

SPN 471 | CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND LEGACIES THROUGH FILM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores Latin American, Latino and/or Peninsular cultures which grapple with various historical, socio-economic and political issues through film. Throughout the course, students will question the construction of individual and collective identities in film, focusing on the intersections of cultural factors such as gender, race and ethnicity, social class, and language, among others. Students will also focus on the ideological substructures involved in the shaping and conforming of those identities by cultural institutions and social systems. Students will also learn vocabulary and techniques for analyzing the formal aspects of film as well as film narrative.

SPN 472 | LITERATURE OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course will explore cultural diversity and the Dominican Republic political, gender and ethnic visions through poetry. Through poetic class experience students will decode culture and society in the Caribbean and U.S. Dominican Latino communities. Students will focus on the following issues: political representations of identity; representations of gender and the cultural readings of "machismo"; the role of art and other forms of cultural expression in shaping identity; cultural criticism of poems as a way to understand culture and the politics of marginality and forms of political mobilization.

SPN 473 | AFRO-HISPANIC LITERATURE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course in contemporary literature will seek to determine what distinguishes the Afro-Hispanic novel, short story, drama or poetry from other works in these genres written in Spanish. Students will read original works in order to analyze how the use of language, imagery and narrative voice reflect the experience of people of African descent in the Spanish-speaking world as seen (or heard) in the text and context of these works. In addition, students will explore how race, class, politics and culture interact and find expression in Afro-Hispanic literature.

SPN 474 | LITERATURE OF THE CONQUEST | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course in Latin American literature explores the early encounters between Europe and the Americas. Students will analyze letters, reports, histories, and political tracts from European, Amerindian, and Mestizo sources. Students will also consider some visual documents, such as images from the Lienzo de Tlaxcala and early maps. Typical areas of focus include the initial contact (Columbus), Mexico (Cortes, Diaz del Castillo, the Florentine Codex), Peru (Xerez, "El Inca" Garcilaso, Guaman Poma de Ayala), and the sixteenth-century debates over the wars of conquest (Las Casas, Sepulveda). Topics include the role of these texts as instruments of empire, strategies of representation, strategies of resistance to imperialism, the role of women in the conquest, debates over what constitutes a "just" war, and the relevance of these texts for modern Latin American identities.

SPN 475 | LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM INDEPENDENCE TO MODERNISM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course in Spanish literature will introduce students to the most important literary movements in Hispanic American countries, beginning with the wars of independence from Spain until the last part of 19th century. Special attention will be given to authors such as Jose Marti, Jorge Issacs, Andres Bello and Ruben Dario, among others.

SPN 476 | SOR JUANA INES DE LA CRUZ | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course in literature will explore the main works of the most influential Mexican poet of the Colonial period, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz (1648-1695). One of the major themes in Sor Juana's work is the right of women to education. Sor Juana wrote poetry, plays, and essays in seventeenth-century Mexico, a society in which women's intellectual inquiry and access to knowledge was an unsafe endeavor and controlled by patriarchal hierarchies. Students will examine the relationship between politics, gender and writing in the context of the historical period, and analyze the spaces and borders occupied and visited by Sor Juana's lyric, ludic, astronomical, polemical, theatrical, theological, cosmological, culinary, colonial, and criollo writings.

SPN 477 | PERUVIAN REALITIES IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY: HSTORY, CULTURE, POLITICS, VIOLENCE & SOCIAL JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the history, culture, politics, and general life of the peoples of Peru. Through an exploration of a vast array of interdisciplinary readings, visual arts and films, students will gain a deep understanding of Peru's history from its extraordinarily pre-Columbian civilizations to its citizens' twenty-first century post civil war struggles to achieve dignity and justice in a multicultural, multilingual and multiethnic nation where Andean, Amazonian, African, Asian and European traditions meet. As a consequence of immense economic and social inequalities, Peru has a long history of violence. This resulted in an internal war that ended ten years ago. Particular attention will be given to contemporary developments in terms of the interaction between culture and politics. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism/Literature category #4 (Latin American literature from Modernism to present).

SPN 478 | FOUNDATIONAL FICTIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This advanced course in Latin American literature explores the relationship of national consolidation and romantic novels. This course is based on the reading, discussion and critique of major representative "Foundational Fictions" in 19th century Latin American literature. Students will examine how the construction of gender and race in these novels portrays the quest to forge new national identity/ies. At the same time, students will analyze how the novels use their characters' romantic relationships to suggest their nation's political relationships, and thus contribute to the discourse on building the new society/ies that would replace Spain's colonial empire and serve as a prototype for the modern Latin American state. (Literature category #3: Latin American literature from origins through Romanticism).

SPN 491 | THE SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF HERITAGE LANGUAGE LITERACY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A heritage language learner has been described as "a student who is raised in a home where a non-English language is spoken, who speaks or merely understands the heritage language, and who is to some degree bilingual in English and the heritage language" (Valdes 2000:1). It is well-documented that for such students, literacy in the heritage language is often lost within just one or two generations. In this third course of DePaul's series on Latino Literacy, students will identify the prominent sociolinguistic issues that intersect with heritage language literacy. Through the reading of selected bibliography and guided reflections on both personal and service learning experiences, each student will arrive at a personalized assessment of the key topics affecting heritage language literacy. Possible topics include language socialization, language ideology and identities, and issues related to language contact with English such as code-switching and language shift/loss.

SPN 492 | TRANSNATIONALISM AND SOCIAL JUSTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course explores the overarching theme of violence across different Latin American social realities. This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore the experience of revolution and repression in contemporary Latin America. Focusing on twentieth-century literature, films and culture, students will explore the making and unmaking of revolutionary political projects and human rights issues, the construction of distinct forms of cultural resistance and the different expressions of violence.

SPN 496 | PRACTICUM IN SPANSIH INSTRUCTION | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Supervised practice in language instruction, paired with a mentor instructor in a beginning or intermediate language course. Students observe a class, teach a lesson or lessons, assist in assessment and lesson planning, and complete individualized assignments to develop their skills as classroom language instructors. Repeatable.

SPN 497 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

See schedule for current offerings.

SPN 498 | STUDY ABROAD | 4-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable credit.

SPN 499 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 4-8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Variable credit.