Core Curriculum Human Community (CCH)

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CCH 110 | ESSENTIALS OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a 5-week, 1-competence course on Employee Training and Development. Students will learn the basic processes of employee training and development, including needs assessment, theories of learning and behavior change, training design to support appropriate selection or development of training, delivery of training, issues of transfer, and assessment of results. (2 quarter hours)

CCH 112 | EXPLORING SUCCESS TECHNIQUES FOR ENHANCING CAREER SKILLS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will address challenges that individuals encounter as they seek to advance in the job market as well as the problems faced within the workplace. The purpose of the course is to refresh and increase your effectiveness and preparation as a job seeker in your chosen field. The course will cover areas such as resume and cover letter writing, interviewing techniques, and effective job searches. Meets first five weeks of the quarter. May only be taken for one competence. (2 quarter hours)

CCH 113 | MANAGING CHANGE FOR ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

If change were simple, all organizations would be effective and thrive in the presence of great challenges. Implementing change involves complex skills combining visionary leadership with project and other management skills. This 5-week class provides an introduction into the management and leadership skills change agents use on a regular basis as they implement organizational change. The focus of the class will be departmental or division change to be most relevant to SNL students. It will provide skill development of both managerial and interpersonal skill elements crucial to the success of change implementations. (2 quarter hours)

CCH 115 | THE CULTURE OF CHRISTMAS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will use examples of contemporary writing and popular art as our windows into the changes to 19th century Christmas Culture. We look at the influx of immigrant Christmas tradition (both in terms of religious and national origin practices that provided the rich selection of cultural choices. We look at the social setting of the wealthy vs. the poor and the urban dweller vs. the settler to see how these affected Christmas practices. (2 quarter hours)

CCH 116 | PSYCHOLOGY OF MALE DEVELOPMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on the development of boys from infancy through adulthood within socio-cultural context. We therefore address in addition to gender, the impact of race, ethnicity, class and related issues of societal /governmental failures when it comes to non-voting children. We cover why boys have more trouble at school, more problems with anger, and more incarcerations than girls or boys of higher social class, but our focus will be on their capacities and how those in power can help them thrive rather than present obstacles in their path from birth onwards. In my work in Chicago schools from Englewood to Rogers Park, I found young boys and teens very capable of caring and empathy but not reinforced by adults to develop these skills. This course suggests ways to change that and help teachers, parents and society not stereotype boys or give up on them so early in life. We will focus on how boys can develop fully as men of character and care, who can succeed in relationships, as parents, at work and in their community. We will learn of advocacy work to convince society to improve the conditions in which boys live. We draw upon the work of the Search Institute, the book "The Men They Will Become" by Eli Newberger (free online) and other current research. We will view workshops including feminist Judith Jordan's "Raising Competent and Connected Boys" and learn of local and national efforts to support young boys development.

CCH 118 | MAKING SOCIAL CHANGE: THE LEGACY OF THE 1960'S | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In the first twenty years following World War II, Americans participated in the democratic process and in civil society in record numbers. They participated in public meetings, belonged to labor unions, joined churches, and formed professional societies. These civic structures and habits of involvement empowered citizens to believe they could make a difference in their communities and laid the groundwork for some of the major social movements of the second half of the 20th Century. Civil rights, second-wave feminism, gay rights, and Latino rights all have their roots in the 1960s and continued their work over the following decades. In this class, we will explore civic engagement through the lens of our recent history. We will look at how these movements developed and analyze how they achieved their goals. We will take lessons from our predecessors and apply them to our own efforts to make a contribution to the lives of people in our local, national or global communities. (2 quarter hours)

CCH 140 | WRITER'S TOOLKIT | 1-2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Writing Toolkit courses introduce, deepen and provide practical engagement with specific topics in writing and rhetoric. These online courses allow students to engage with their peers and instructors through asynchronous and synchronous elements.

CCH 141 | COACHING FOR PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT AND PROFESSIONAL EFFECTIVENESS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Effective coaching has long been recognized as a key element of success in the world of sports. More recently, a new breed of coaches has emerged to help people transform their personal and professional lives. In this course, we will explore the theories, concepts, and techniques of personal life and business coaching. Students will learn about the history of coaching, its uses in personal and professional development and practical applications. Working individually, in pairs, and in small groups, students will practice coaching skills and keep a detailed learning journal. This course will be highly experiential and collaborative in nature. Students will learn concepts of coaching for personal development and professional effectiveness. (2 quarter hours)

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 146 | HOW FAMILIES COMMUNICATE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply a wide range of theories about family communication to an experience common to all-family life. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of how communication functions to develop, maintain, enrich, or limit family relationships across a wide range of family structures and cultural backgrounds. Among the family relationship issues considered in this course are patterns of intimacy, power, decision-making, roles, rituals and conflict. Factors involved in forming family patterns (e.g. gender, ethnicity, family diversity and family stories) will also be covered.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 154 | RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS | 6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How do we understand and heal the wounds of racism? How do we build bridges that allow diversity to flourish in the United States? What are the connections among forms of racism such as ethnic cleansing and "pacification programs"? In this course, we will explore the roots of racism, look at the changes brought about by the civil rights movement, and examine ongoing work aimed at bridging the gaps caused by racism. Students will study a variety of topics through discussion, readings, films, debate, guest panels, and field excursions. (6 quarter hours)

CCH 155 | ANALYZING LEADERSHIP | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course provides a framework from which to identify and analyze leadership. Leadership occurs in all aspects of life, including: business, politics, sports, society, religion, family, education, and culture. But what is leadership? The Merriam-Webster on-line dictionary defines leadership as "the act or an instance of leading," which provides us with little insight. On further investigation, however, the dictionary defines "lead" as [guide] on a way especially by going in advance. Where there is a leader, then, someone or something must follow. This course first explores the interrelationship between a leader and his or her followers and looks at the effect they have on each other. "Good" leadership traits (i.e., effective) and "bad" leadership traits (i.e., ineffective) are then studied from the perspectives of the leaders, the followers, and outsiders. Finally, this course takes a look at leadership from an international perspective. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 165 | CHINA: MONEY, POWER AND THE 21ST CENTURY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The greatest migration of people in the history of the world is occurring right now, in China. Hundreds of millions of people, whose families have lived in rural China for thousands of years, are moving to rapidly urbanizing cities. This course analyzes, through the voices of the Chinese people, the dramatic impact of this social and economic revolution upon families and individuals. These changes are having a worldwide impact upon economics, trade and the new world order. Through lecture/discussions, videos, readings, on-line discussion boards and independent research, students will have the opportunity to form their own viewpoints as to the impact of globalization upon one of the oldest civilizations on earth. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 171 | ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN ACTION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What is organizational culture? Culture is the way things are done in the organization, a system of shared symbols and a variable that focuses on causality. In this course, you will examine what organizational culture is and how knowledge of culture provides a way for gathering information to help leaders/managers improve organizational performances. This course provides a hands-on approach to learning to "read" organizational cultures and using that cultural knowledge in symbolic management, training, organizational change, building effective teams, supporting diversity, and unleashing creativity. In terms of cultural analysis, through this course, you will be introduced to qualitative research methods, field observation, interviewing, qualitative surveys, content analysis, and other methods of textual analysis. The textbook is an applied workbook to supplement and apply organizational theory. It answers two central questions: How to understand the intangible culture that is so important to working in an organization, and how to use this cultural information. Finally, you will have a chance to transform theories into practice.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 189 | LATINO CHICAGO | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, we will learn about the concepts of race, class and gender and how these intersect to shape Chicago Latinos' experiences. While we will learn about the inequities that Latinos have experienced, we will also explore this community's struggle for social justice and its efforts to create a voice for itself in Chicago. We will conclude this course by exploring how Latinos/as are building new political, theoretical, economic, artistic, and spiritual pathways toward wholeness and justice. For example, we will explore some of the cultural and political projects of this community and the many groups that comprise it. We will learn about these themes and address questions through readings, class lectures and discussions, guest lectures, documentary films and field trips. Field trips to Latino Chicago communities such as Pilsen and Humboldt Park will take place during class time.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 190 | LAW IN AMERICA: ITS HISTORY AND RELEVANCE IN TODAY'S WORLD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed to enhance students' awareness of how critical American law is for their personal, professional, and community life. The purpose is to help students achieve a better grasp of current realities through understanding of the history, the structure, and inherent problems of the American legal system. The course will discuss the role of lawyers and the public in the legal process (e.g. the role of civil rights groups and lobbyists in forming laws). It will begin with the colonial underpinnings and the essentially Western and British foundations of the American legal institutions. There will be some discussion of alternative legal systems. It will then review the American Constitution, the nature of a federal system, and specific topics in American law. These topics will include the basic rights in our system, and the law as it has evolved in dealing with race ("the strange career of Jim Crow"), speech (free and otherwise), labor (its rough course), criminality and its outcomes, religion (how religious is the law), and business regulation (how much can we trust antitrust). The course will be relevant for students interested in the law as a career, the law in the workplace, the law in not-for-profit settings, and those generally interested in the law in business contexts, as well as those seeking to understand the role of the law in our social and cultural context. We will use one major textbook, as well as selected readings on topics. Students will be asked to bring their own experiences with the American legal system into our discussions and to share their perspectives of the various topics.

CCH 192 | HOW, WHAT AND WHY WE EAT: THE ART, SCIENCE AND PSYCHOLOGY OF FOOD | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

We have many connections to food. Food sustains us but it has meaning that extends far beyond basic nutrition. Eating is an individual pleasure and comfort, a tool for creating and sustaining social bonds, and a way to express one's cultural identity. Food is tied to many aspects of life including culture, politics, agriculture and the environment. Americans have become disconnected from both the production of our food and from the joy of eating it and suffer from food related health problems such as diabetes, obesity and eating disorders. In this class we will explore the myriad of food-related habits and choices, that determine how what and why we eat. This experiential class moves beyond specific dietary guidelines by presenting concepts and skills that will help you reframe your connections with food. We will explore the multiple dimensions of food and eating from an individual, community and national level. We will explore the true meaning of nourishment. Topics include: identifying personal eating styles, mindful eating exercises, the slow food movement, locating Chicago food deserts, a field trip to a popular Chicago organic garden/restaurant, guest speaker from a Chicago restaurant mural artist, examining types of hunger and nourishment, and issues involving food and ritual, food and story, food and psychology, food and art. We will combine art, film clips, lectures, field trip, research, and mindful eating skills.

CCH 199 | MANIFESTATIONS OF BELIEF: RELIGION VS. THE CONSTITUTION DURING THE HOLIDAYS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The United States Constitution guarantees freedom of religion to its citizens. What is freedom of religion? How is this basic right interpreted? How far can the individual citizen go in demonstrating religious belief? When do the rights of the many supercede the rights of the few? These questions have been particularly prickly over the last few years when objections to the recitations by school children of the Pledge of Allegiance, and the display of religiously oriented holiday decorations have made national news. Where do you fall on these issues? Is it okay for New York City to have a big Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center? Do you mind if your neighborhood church displays a creche on its front lawn? What about the town hall? In this course, students will examine holiday displays around town and assess their relation to freedom of expression and freedom of religion. Students will also consider the nature of free societies, their relationship to community values, and the ways in which difference is valued, or not valued, in contemporary American culture. (2 quarter hours)

CCH 201 | DYING AND DEATH: FACING MORTALITY, CELEBRATING LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

We live in an aging American society that is both death-denying and death-defying. Few are prepared for death. This course offers a unique opportunity to directly reflect upon life's end at and individual and personal level. Doing so allows us to be most full present as we live and with others when dying and death touch their lives, as well as when either touches our own. While this exploration can be challenging, it can also be enlightening, enriching, uplifting, and even liberating. Most of all, the amazing adventure of facing mortality has significant implications for the choices we make today. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 202 | STRATEGIC CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, we will distinguish principled negotiation from positional negotiation. When all parties in a negotiation recognize everyone's values and interests, the stage is set for principled negotiation. In order to uncover the underlying values and interests of all parties in the negotiation, we will learn the process to manage our perceptions and the techniques to manage the other party's perceptions. We will recognize the value of various types of questions. Generally speaking, contract formation is the goal of a successful negotiation. Understanding basic contract law is key to improving a negotiation. We will examine the development of contract law. We will cover the basics of contract formation: offer, acceptance and consideration. We will examine the remedies available when a contract is breached. We will review various examples of contract disputes to evaluate the practical application of what we learned. We will put to use our basic understanding of contract law and the existence of inequities in bargaining power and our acquired negotiation skills, including using the model of spiritual development of the "four agreements," to use by participating in a contract negotiation as a final class project. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 209 | CONSUMER BEHAVIOR INSIGHTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In the Consumer Behavior Insights course, students explore the processes that consumers use to make decisions. Understanding of consumer segments is developed and applied to create communication strategies using a decision-making framework. Through coursework, students demonstrate an understanding of various topics including how market intelligence is collected, market segmentation, the impact of various cultural influences on behavior, elements of persuasive communication and development of consumer-oriented strategies. Cultural norms influence receptivity to marketing communication messages. In-depth consumer knowledge of a sub-cultural segment is learned and applied as students conduct market research. Based on analysis, students develop communication objectives, positioning statements and strategies for consumer communication. The role of mass media is examined in two distinct areas. Mass media influence cultural values by reinforcing norms for consumer needs and wants. Mass media are also important means for communication of targeted advertising messages. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 212 | GLOBAL LEADERSHIP | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Leading global and domestic organizations requires understanding, appreciating and managing the impact of culture and the interplay of cultural patterns in everyday interactions. To be successful, leaders must be able to interpret complex cultural contexts and develop intercultural competence, not only in themselves but in the people they lead and the other organizations they work with. Developing intercultural competence is an ongoing endeavor that requires stretching one's thinking to adopt new cultural perspectives regarding others' values, attitudes and behaviors. But it is not an end in itself: intercultural competence is the basis for successful social interactions and business communications, which are especially important in today's "flat" world. "Global Leadership at Home and Abroad" will explore the demand for and ways to develop this distinct skill set among leaders so they can establish communities and initiate change across diverse groups of stakeholders. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 217 | HIP HOP AND THE POLITICS OF DIFFERENCE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is a study of gender and contemporary popular culture. Few can deny the influence hip hop exerts; however, what began as party music in the late 1970s has matured into a global cultural enterprise. Embedded in this enterprise is evidence of an emerging political discourse that upends the compulsory scripts ascribed to black masculinity. Hip hop puts forward a set of sophisticated counter-narratives that repurpose the anger borne out of the systematic alienation of black men from attaining the full promise of American masculinity. The course will investigate the ways commercial hip hop facilitates the (re)production and dissemination of black American masculinity post-1965. Students will examine the sociohistorical and socioeconomic conditions from which rap emerges and continues to derive inspiration. Students will be guided through a careful reading of Judith Butler's Performative Acts and will use the work to wrestle with the ways commercial hip hop's consensual relationship with global capital complicates the project of black humanity fomenting a politics of difference.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 219 | THE FIGHT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS: ONE WOMAN'S CRUSADE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Helen Prejean is a leading human rights activist in the United States. For the past 30 years, she has helped shape conversation about equal treatment for all within the criminal justice system, especially persons of color and the materially poor. Dead Man Walking, the eyewitness account of her experience accompanying condemned prisoners to execution, has had a major influence on discussion of violence, poverty, civil rights, criminal law, and social justice. In this course, we use her work and interact with her personally to study power inequities across race and class lines that perpetuate injustice and examine her strategies for reform.

CCH 221 | PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING SKILLS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Authentic, credible oral communication is paramount to attain professional and personal success. The purpose of this course is to hone each student's ability to orally communicate effectively and with ease. Regardless of the starting point - as a beginner or a seasoned speaker - we will identify personal strengths and areas for improvement, and work upward from there. With an emphasis on the professional environment, we will explore a variety of common scenarios. Students will gain practical techniques to improve performance - ranging from formal presentations to meeting facilitations to impromptu thinking. These workplace opportunities are abundant, and participants will learn methods to shine within each! Because we represent different industries, backgrounds, and experience levels, we will employ a mix of individual and collaborative activities. The latter will ensure that we're capitalizing on resources within our unique learning group. Students will be encouraged to select topics that are relevant to their respective careers. As well, students may use this class as an opportunity to work on their real-life speaking scenarios(s), provided it fits within the assignment parameters. (2 credit hours)

CCH 222 | FACILITATIVE DIALOGUE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Verbal communication is an essential component in virtually every aspect of our interpersonal lives. The focus of this course is to study those situations and settings where we need to facilitate appropriate dialogue in order to arrive at a solution in the face of potentially emotional volatility. As examples, these conversations can include: confronting an uncooperative coworker, assessing alleged wrongdoing by a student, addressing resistance in a patient, or meeting the needs of a disgruntled customer. In these situations, our own behavioral and verbal actions are important determinants in the direction, duration, and consequences of the interaction. Given the potential for us to be verbally accosted, hostilely confronted, and/or be inappropriately blamed, we often have to manage our own emotions in addition to trying to engage in facilitative dialogue. Students will examine the processes involved in emotionally volatile situations including how our emotional and physiological state work in these situations. Students will learn a framework to more effectively manage the situation in order to arrive at an acceptable outcome. This course is appropriate for those in human resources, patient- and service-oriented industries, counseling, education, leadership development, and other settings where facilitative dialogue is necessary.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 228 | WOMEN IN CHINA: IMAGES AND ROLES | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Through the introduction of images and roles of Chinese women in the past and present, this course will examine the evolving position of women in the Chinese society, the challenges that they still face, and the impact of globalization and economic developments on them today. Still photos, paintings, videos, and films will be used. (2 quarter hours)

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 235 | CHINA:WHY CHINA MATTERS-GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP FROM AN ASIAN PERSPECTIVE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In light of China's influence on socio-economic and cultural globalization, the program examines the role of culture with its values and paradigmatic assumptions and what it means to be an informed global citizen. Inter-cultural exchanges in the USA and China guide students to critically analyze values about democracy and raise awareness about the role a country's cultural beliefs in forming and sustaining such values in its citizens. On-site, guided excursions into historical sites, e.g., the Great Wall, the Confucian Temple and Imperial Academy, Beijing's Business District, and the ancient neighborhood of Hutongs and dialogue with Chinese university students and faculty, clarify the roles and impact of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism on the global stage. This international, cross-cultural dialogue is facilitated to question assumptions while gaining a deeper understanding of differing world views. Participants will mutually explore their cultures through readings, guest lectures, and Internet-based interaction prior to and during the travel in China, with students and faculty at the Agricultural University in Beijing and Xiamen University in southeast China. The activities are designed to engage participants in critical discourse and analysis on the differences as much as the common ground surrounding issues such as social and civic engagement, democracy, and religion from the respective cultures.

CCH 236 | CULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS IN CUBA: WHO TALKS TO WHOM IN SCHOOLS AND CAFES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This study abroad course will provide participants with a foundation in the theories of intercultural communications. They will observe how people from different cultures communicate in public spaces, cafes, schools and other institutions and evaluate how communications are affected by place. Through their stay in Havana and a day trip to Vinhales, participants will analyze how different socio- cultural factors interact to shape individuals and interaction patterns in these different settings, as well as in the United States. They will engage in global communication and evaluate the impact of communication differences that diverse political, religious, social, ethnic and educational backgrounds have on individuals communicating within an organization or individually. Prior to departure, participants will use interactive, online technology to engage in cross-cultural communication and to create criteria for evaluating and comparing communication patterns. In Cuba, participants will collaboratively use the criteria to analyze cross-cultural aspects of language and interactions in various settings from social and political perspectives. The trip duration is 7 days. The readings and activities ground students in recent theories of intercultural practice and provide a framework for students to become interculturally competent. Students will be staying in small groups in Casa Particulares, similar to Bed and Breakfasts, and hosted by Cuban families. The activities tentatively planned include touring Old Havana and the Plaza de la Revolucion, a visit to the Museo de la Revolucion, a visit to the Callejon de Hamel street fair, a day in rural Cuba to visit a tobacco farm and the Sierra del Rosario Biosphere Reserve, a visit to the Akokan community and the Casa de Africa, and a day at the beach. An important part of the curriculum are visits to local elementary schools, guest lectures with local university professors and an afternoon and evening with university students.

CCH 237 | CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND CLIENT RELATIONS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will introduce students to a variety of strategies for conflict management and negotiation. Students will engage in a number of hands-on activities to develop skills that will benefit them in and beyond the workplace.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 238 | ENGAGING RESILIENCE IN ADULT LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Building & Engaging Resilience (in Adult Life) (4 credit hours) (Fac: Matamonasa) ? An ancient proverb reads: ?Fall down seven times. Stand up eight.? But how? What?s involved in such flexibility, adaptability, tenacity, hardiness and resilience? What understandings, values and skills help? How does one develop these and nurture them across an adult lifetime? Through this seminar, participants will explore various concepts, models and ?best practices? for growing, rebounding and selfguarding one?s resilience?given the challenges and uncertainties of adult life. (Questions? Contact instructor at amatamo1@depaul.edu.)

CCH 239 | BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY AND OUR GLOBAL FUTURE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Students will study the latest changes in the fields of intercultural communication and leadership development in today's global corporations, including reading interviews from some of the world's leaders in manufacturing, energy, telecommunications, and health care from numerous countries. This course combines hard science with cutting-edge organizational research-based case studies in today's trans-cultural global corporations. Students study key behaviors needed today to be successful in a global corporation, including cultural self-awareness, frame-shifting, inviting the unknown, third-way solutions, and others. Students will also study how "disruptive technologies", mobile internet, automation of knowledge work, cloud technology, next generation genomics, 3D printing, advanced materials, and renewable energy are changing and will continue to revolutionize global corporations. This course concludes with an analysis of the effects of social justice and corporate social responsibility on today's global corporations. (4 credit hours)

CCH 243 | POST-TRAUMATIC SLAVE SYNDROME AND ITS AFFECTS | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This FDIS seeks to inform students about the nature of trauma, and the impact of post-traumatic slave syndrome (PTSS) on African-American life and culture. In the context of this course, both of these phenomena are associated with 250 years of U.S. chattel slavery, followed by decades of de jure and de facto racial discrimination. It is a subject that has historical, psychological and sociological implications and thus is a must for students pursuing undergraduate and/or graduate work in these areas. With this primary goal in mind, students will be asked to review one of two texts on the subject, Joy DeGruy-Leary's Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: America's Legacy of Enduring Inquiry and Healing or Thom Burrell's Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority, along with selected readings where appropriate.

CCH 249 | NEW YORK: AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This Faculty Designed Independent Study (FDIS) encourages students to study the history of one of our nation's oldest and most vibrant cities: New York City, including its five boroughs: Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and Queens. The readings associated with the course provide a skeletal history of the city's nearly four hundred years. Students are then asked to read a series of articles that elaborate on key historical events and/or eras, i.e. the city's role in the American Revolution, the Great Depression, the impact of deindustrialization and suburbanization, and development of art and culture across different epochs, among other areas. Students are finally asked to supplement readings and a major homework assignment with a five-page paper that mirrors the spirit of their competence. The collection of readings and video presentations offer a fascinating, insightful, and fun look at one of the most interesting and intriguing American metropolises.

CCH 253 | FAMILY LIFE: THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF FAMILIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In history, families have been defined as mother, father, and children. In our current experience, more families differ from that model than comply with it. Family structure is evolving. Missing fathers, Single parents, and Blended families are only a few of the changes to the family structure that have occurred with some significance beginning in the 1950s. (2-4 quarter hours) What influences family structure? Do economics and education make a difference? Are race and ethnicity important factors? What about gender, personality and religion? Is the two parent family necessary? What role do grandparents and great grandparents play in the changing family? Perhaps the most important question we can ask about the family is what comes next. What are the many ways in which families might be redesigned in the future? How do these changes impact individuals in society?.

CCH 257 | PARTICIPATION AND DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Why don't more Americans vote? How do education, income, and age impact voting trends? Why are some Americans more interested in politics than others? How is inequality reflected in other forms of political participation, such as donating money? Do recent trends in voter ID laws help to safeguard the democratic process, or restrict it? In summary, how democratic or representative are American elections? The course begins with some famous arguments about why participation matters. Trends in voter turnout then become the primary object of study, but we also consider other forms of participation including writing members of Congress, attending political meetings and contributing money. We explore recent discoveries in behavioral psychology that are changing the strategies of modern campaigns. After taking this course, you will understand the fundamental role of participation in democracy.

CCH 262 | THE HAPPINESS PROJECT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What is happiness? How do we know that we are happy? How can we become happier in our lives? In recent years, there have been an increasing number of college courses dedicated to the study of happiness, positive psychology, life satisfaction, etc. This course will be an introduction to how various fields and disciplines are examining topics relevant to the nature of happiness and well-being, while providing an opportunity for students to examine their own ideas and expectations for happiness. Using Gretchen Rubin's popular book, The Happiness Project, as a guide, we will review the latest theories and research in psychology, the sciences, religion, and the arts, as well as ancient wisdom and popular culture, to determine what is known and assumed about happiness. Participants in the course will develop and assess their own happiness project during the last several weeks of the course.

CCH 267 | WORKPLACE LAW: HARASSMENT, DISCRIMINATION AND CIVIL RIGHTS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course focuses on laws affecting relationships between employers and employees and within the workplace. Students will study the historical and societal aspects of laws on harassment and discrimination within the workplace, with particular focus on the Civil Rights Act and various other legislation regulating harassment and discrimination in the workplace. Students will analyze the case law, the legislation and the legal systems that have evolved to combat social injustice in the workplace and will learn "best methods" for preventing and resolving harassing and discriminatory practices in the workplace. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 274 | THE BILL OF RIGHTS IN CONTEMPORARY LIFE AND WORK | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will be organized around a series of central questions: What is a law? Who has the authority to make one? What are the various sources of law? What is or should be the relationship between law, ethics and morality, between law and religion? What is the difference between legislative law and constitutional law? What are the legal, historical, philosophical and political sources of American constitutional law? What sort of society did the Framers of the Bill of Rights have in mind and are their ideas still applicable in 21st century America? How does the Bill of Rights fit into our constitutional framework and what rights does it guarantee? What is the relationship between the states and the federal government in guaranteeing those rights? What is the relationship between our legal system and our political system generally? What criteria do judges use to interpret laws? How does our own legal system differ from those of other countries and cultures? Are there any universal rights worth protecting? What role does (or should) science play in upholding our rights under the Bill of Rights? Possible areas to be covered are freedom of speech, religion, establishment of church and state, the right to privacy, the 4th, 5th and 6th Amendments? protections for criminal defendants and the death penalty.

CCH 281 | VOICE OF HER OWN: EQUALITY IN ACTION | 2-6 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

On January 21, 2017, over two million women around the world marched. They marched in big cities, small towns, and on every continent. Why did they march? What was and will be the impact of their marching? What can we learn from this phenomenon? These are questions we will explore in this course using three different disciplinary perspectives: history, psychology, and rhetoric. (6 credit hours)

CCH 282 | LEISURE FOR WELL-BEING | 2 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The pursuit of happiness for most people is an important aim in life. A personal feeling of well-being includes "emotional happiness" and the rational satisfaction with one's own life. In this course you will attempt to define the term "well-being" and discover its relationship with other concepts such as mental health and life satisfaction. How does physical exercise influence well-being? How do positive and negative life events influence well-being? Do good social relationships guarantee happiness? Do the expectations one has in life with regard to income influence well-being? Is it important to set goals to achieve a high level of well-being? These and other questions will be addressed in this course. You will try to define some of things a person can do to increase his or her level of well-being. Others' ideas serve as common course content, as presented in the material assigned to this course. You will be asked to participate actively and critically, to work individually and in study groups, using your own experience as a field of analysis and reflection. Active group participation will foster a harmonic, interactive environment, which might increase positive relationships among students and foster a feeling of well-being throughout this course. (2 quarter hours)

CCH 283 | GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES OF WORK & FAMILY | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

What role does the political, economic, and cultural structure of a nation play in its concepts of work and family? This course develops students' understanding of issues in the history of family and work through historical and contemporary accounts from Europe and the United States. We will take a close look at issues such as the gender division of labor, child labor, government policies on maternity, economic structure as well as social and political movements. Course materials include historical documents, lectures, films, and varied readings. Assignments will include essays, reflection journals, discussion, and a research project on work-life balance. (4 credit hours)

CCH 284 | JAZZ AGE PARIS: 1919-1939 | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This is a history of Parisian society and culture in the era between the two world wars. We will explore issues of race, class and gender in the interwar period in French society. We will also examine the role of American writers, artists, musicians and performers in the cultural world of Paris, the City of Light, and an outpost in the Harlem Renaissance. (4 credit hours)

CCH 286 | NEW ORLEANS IN SONG, STORY & STRUGGLE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The tapestry of New Orleans culture is tremendously rich and varied. This course will concentrate on two strands in that tapestry music from New Orleans and fiction about it. Students will learn about music forms which originated in the city or its environs and which have gone on to dazzle the world, including jazz, r&b, zydeco and funk. We will situate these art forms in social and historical context and examine the complex creative processes which have shaped them. We will become familiar with innovators and icons such as Louis Armstrong, Professor Longhair, Clifton Chenier, the Neville Bothers and Dr. John. We will also read works by literary artists who have a background in and/or fascination with New Orleans, including The Awakening by Kate Chopin; A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams; and Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed. Moreover, we will consider the role played in American history and imagination by New Orleans as well as the role played by images and fantasies of New Orleans in struggles for social justice at the local and national level.

CCH 289 | PSYCHOLOGY FROM AN AFRICAN-CENTERED PERSPECTIVE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course utilizes an African-centered theoretical framework to examine salient themes pertinent to the psychology of people of African descent, including child development, family functioning, identity, education, racial oppression, spirituality, and healing. It takes an historical and topical approach to foster greater understanding about the course content. Through this examination, the learner will become more knowledgeable about the psychological experiences of people of African descent, the role of history and culture in human development, and the subjectivity of research in the social and natural sciences. They will also reflect on the relevance of the course material to their personal lives.

CCH 293 | LAW AND THE WORKPLACE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will examine the interrelationships between our economy, business and the practice of law. It will also examine contemporary legal issues in the world of work. Students will examine the structures of the legal community and the impact it has on how business is conducted, and on the economic system in which we live and work. Through readings, discussion, and group projects, students will investigate the interfaces of law, with an emphasis on torts and employment law, as well as current issues which have evolved as the practice of law has become a big business itself. Students will develop and evaluate plans individually or through group interaction for applying new insights to affecting change in their own working environments. (2-4 quarter hours)

CCH 299 | ASSESSING AND MANAGING CONFLICT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Our usual method for presenting, analyzing, and resolving conflicts has centered around legalistic argument; the goal being to discover the "right" answer and suppress the "wrong" ones. However, the multiple worldviews operating in the world today make such an approach to conflict less viable. Reflecting this reality, ways of communicating about and resolving conflict have arisen that go beyond enforcement of rules or legal determinations of right and wrong. In this course, we will look at various methods for handling conflict and consider how we might apply them to personal, work, community and literary conflicts through lecture, small group work, role playing, reading, various written projects, and discussion.

CCH 300 | GLOBALIZATION AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

For decades scholars have observed a growing body of evidence and employers a growing body of experience of significant changes in the way that international business is conducted. These changes in the business world, brought on largely by globalization, present new challenges. These challenges require staff with specific skills related to global competence in order for the business to remain competitive. The goal of this course is to help students to cultivate and/or refine the skills and capabilities necessary to succeed in today's global work environment. Organized around four learning units and one major project, the class will provide each student with extensive content and resources; it will also provide a forum for assessing the competences necessary to attain success in a global workplace and a method for honing those skills each student needs to cultivate. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 315 | ECONOMICS FOR DECISION-MAKING | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to provide the modern consumer living in a global economy fueled by unabated technological progress, with basic notions to understand the path that has led to sustained prosperity. The focus is on endowing students, as householders, with conceptual tools to make optimal financial and consumer decisions throughout the life-cycle. That theoretical foundation is reinforced and exemplified with a wealth of practical applications offered through a student-friendly online interactive learning platform, which also provides a convenient means to complete weekly assignments. That online platform will help students relate what they learn to their everyday experience of active participants in the economic game. The course is divided into two modules, microeconomic and macroeconomic, and basic economic methodology is presented in both. Microeconomic topics include scarcity, opportunity costs, the law of diminishing returns, the trade principle of comparative advantage, the mechanism of the price system, the laws of demand and supply, the impact of market interventions by the government, etc. Macroeconomic topics include the forces undergirding the performance of the gross domestic product (GDP), the forces that influence inflation and unemployment, the role of fiscal and monetary policy, the workings of money and banking, the relevance of balancing the requirements of economic growth (efficiency in the use of inputs) with the necessity of attending to the needs of both society (need for equity) and the environment (need for sustainability), etc. (2-4 credit hours)

CCH 323 | INTERNATIONAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS: HISTORY AND PRACTICE | 2-4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This foundational course introduces the history and the evolving meaning of human rights and international law including the study of current global human rights issues, notably genocide and refugees. (2-4 quarter hours)

CCH 325 | CONNECTING THOUGHT AND BEHAVIOR IN THE WORKPLACE, THE COMMUNITY, AND IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course introduces students to practical concepts of Cognitive Behavioral Psychology and offers them new perspectives on how to observe and understand the interaction between thoughts and behaviors in their daily lives. Students will evaluate the tendencies and correlations between what a person "thinks" and what that person "does" through observation and interpretation of their own experiences. A report will be generated that will include an analysis of the student's own cognitive behavioral tendencies and a plan for personal development.

CCH 334 | THE BUSINESS OF US HEALTH CARE IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will provide students with a foundation on the various dimensions of today's health care system to include how it operates and is managed. This course will examine the interactions between insurance companies, the U.S. government and health providers to the delivery of quality care to the individual. The overview will include the structure of health care system segments, demographics and context of differentiation in the delivery of medical care. Students will improve their knowledge and skills in thinking critically through healthcare-related issues, successfully understand the concepts presented and discuss the ethical contexts of the decisions that businesses, government agencies and decision-makers consider when addressing health care. Key activities will entail research, analysis, and identification of best practices. Students will analyze the financial and economic health care decisions at a national, community and business level.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 335 | HUMAN RESOURCE AND TALENT DEVELOPMENT FUNDAMENTALS FOR MANAGERS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is designed as an introduction to the practices of human resources (HR) in a corporate environment. It will target the practices that managers need to know such as recruiting, training, hiring, and terminating employees as well as the basics of HR law. Additional content that will be addressed includes headcount management, performance appraisals, learning & development, compensation basics, and grievance processes. This course will equip managers with the information they need to know without making them Human Resource experts but rather how to work effectively with their HR counterparts. (4 hours)

CCH 344 | INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: A CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

In this course, students will examine how cultural attributes shared by a society's members affect international affairs. Those attributes include ways of thinking and reasoning, styles of behavior and communication, and fundamental assumptions and values. The course is organized into three parts: an examination of American cultural patterns; an examination of cultural influences on human thought processes; and an examination of the cultural dimension of international negotiation through a comparison of Asian, European, Central American and the U.S. methods of reaching agreements.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 359 | ETHICAL BUSINESS BEHAVIOR | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

Ethical Business Behavior explores the ethical issues that business decision-makers face and examines the moral principles that are used to help resolve these issues. Ethical decisions in the workplace can have tremendous influence on the individuals and the corporations involved. The outcomes of unethical behavior can affect reputations, trust and career path. Results have been as severe as loss of employment, physical harm to individuals, corporate bankruptcy and even impacts to the economy. Students are placed in decision-making roles through exercises, case studies and role-playing. Reasoning skills are honed through identification of ethical issues and alternative means to analyze these issues. Ethical behavior is evaluated using analytical skills to apply ethical concepts to business situations. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 362 | POVERTY, POLICY AND THE ECONOMY: POOR IN THE USA | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will explore the history of efforts to help the poor in the United States. The impact of the economy and foreign policy upon support for government funded programs to assist low income persons will be evaluated. Students will engage in first hand learning by researching resources available to help those in need.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 363 | ACHIEVING YOUR WORK AND LIFE GOALS | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

You will study the process of goal achievement from goal definition through development of a vision, review of resources and obstacles, strategic ordering of tasks and steps, effective communication and problem solving and development of an action plan. You will consider theories of goal setting, planning, communication, and negotiation, and engage in practical exercises that will require the application of theory. You will produce a completed action plan for a defined career or personal goal. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 367 | LEISURE, RECREATION, AND HEALTH | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course will stimulate your thinking about the meaning of leisure in your life. Leisure today and historically has been central to the human experience. It is an elemental experience, essential to the total well-being of every person; it is a reflection and expression of the cultural values of a society; it is an important vehicle for treatment. Leisure and recreation services are also essential for healthy communities in terms of social climate, environmental quality, and economic stability. Leisure services comprise one of the largest and fastest growing industries in the world, whether measured in dollars spent, persons served, hours of time devoted, or resources used. The study of leisure and recreation is a broad discipline, combining diverse fields of study and professional practice. This course will (1) illustrate the importance of leisure to you and your loved ones, (2) contribute to your ability to become an informed consumer of leisure, (3) question the binary relationship of work and leisure and, (4) teach you how to use leisure to increase emotional and physical health, resulting in a higher quality of life. The course will be interactive and participatory.

CCH 370 | AFRICAN SPIRITUALITY AND EDUCATION | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

The course involves an in-depth study of indigenous African educational practices and the spiritual values that support them. Indigenous Africans understand and live life as one whole, rather than seeing it as a compartmentalized experience of religion, spirituality, politics, economics, etc. Using Nelson Mandela's autobiography "A Long Walk to Freedom" and the instructor's book, "The Heartbeat of Indigenous Africa," the course will invite students to remember, reclaim, and re-tell their own stories of childhood experiences, educational experience, and life experience. Class work will include discussion, active story-telling and listening, projects, and writing. Out-of-class-work will include talking with and listening to selected elders such as storytellers, parents, grandparents, formators, counselors and others, in order to disclose and identify fundamental human virtues/values that are inherent in any holistic human formation process. (4 quarter hours)

CCH 383 | PROMOTING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

How can we organize our communities and design programs to improve rates of asthma, HIV and obesity? This course will explore a variety of methods that organizations in Chicago use including the identification of community assets that can mobilize to improve health. Students will read about and analyze the reasons that health inequality is linked to income, race, national origin and age, and learn experientially by developing their own project with an organization in Humboldt Park called the Community of Wellness that was launched as a community wide effort to promote a healthier community.

Status as a Decision Analytics or Degree Completion student is a prerequisite for this class.

CCH 387 | AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES IN CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE | 4 quarter hours

(Undergraduate)

This course is important for students who seek to gain a comprehensive understanding of African-American history in the United States. It will begin with discussions of African culture, the Atlantic Slave Trade, and early forms of slavery/indenturing. It will pay particular attention to the colonial and Revolutionary experience, delving into the mass exodus of Africans during the Revolutionary War, and African-American's role and position in the country's formative years. Enslavement, the Civil War and Reconstruction will follow as key areas of study. In every discussion, students will be asked to look for parallels between the contemporary and 18th and 19th century African-American experience and, where appropriate, to identify key social and cultural thinkers and leaders of the various historical periods. The primary texts for the course will be John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom, articles and readings written by scholars and important early African-American artists and intellectuals, and video presentations.