Graduate School of Business (GSB)

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GSB 400 | FOUNDATIONS OF QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides basic instruction in mathematical and statistical methods as a foundation for GSB420 Applied Quantitative Analysis. This course will focus on strengthening algebra and calculus skills and provide a basic introduction to statistical methods.

GSB 420 | BUSINESS ANALYTICS TOOLS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course provides foundational quantitative analytical skills to address typical problems that arise in business. The course emphasizes a problem-oriented approach utilizing software applications such as Excel for data analyses. The topics covered in the course include relevant mathematical concepts such as algebra and probability theory/application as well as a strong focus on fundamental statistical tools such as hypothesis testing, regression analysis and forecasting.

GSB 500 | U.S. BUSINESS CULTURE & PRACTICE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of how to be successful in the U.S., both academically and professionally. The course covers the concepts, methods and tools necessary to face the challenges of studying and working in the U.S. Students will improve their skills in oral communication, practical business writing, and delivering presentations. Students will also gain knowledge of the career search process.

GSB 595 | DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES: PRACTICUM | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to integrate the concept of strategy development into the larger ecological economic context of serving market/society needs in a finite world. The goal of strategy in organizations has traditionally been defined as one of value maximization, from the shareholder perspective exclusively. But the role of strategy is to guide organizations in competitively defining and meeting market/society's needs. Sustainable strategies take into account multiple perspectives by engaging in practices - principally systems thinking - to pursue opportunities in meeting market/society's needs that are economically viable, socially just, and operate responsibly within the constraints of a finite ecology. Students will demonstrate the literacies required to develop sustainable strategies that take into account all facets of the business venture (marketing, finance, management, design, production and distribution/life cycle analysis.) One key question will shape the trajectory of the course: 'How does one develop a competitive sustainable strategy to serve some market/society need?' Therefore, the focus of this course is for the student to select a need, determine the sustainable economic system to develop and deliver the product/service, and write and present the 'business case.' The student will also articulate the values and vision - personally and organizationally - driving the strategy.

GSB 599 | STRATEGIC ANALYSIS FOR COMPETING GLOBALLY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This capstone course views the impact of contemporary issues on corporate strategy. Competitive, cultural, social and ethical issues are examined within the context of a global business environment. The course content emphasizes identifying strategic alternatives, developing corporate and business strategies, and understanding the role of functional activities and organizational processes from a strategic viewpoint. The process of the course involves team interaction, problem-solving, group decision-making, written reports and oral presentations.

ACC 500, GSB 420, MGT 500, (MGT 502 or MGT 504), (ECO 509 or ECO 502), (ACC 555 or ACC 554), ECO 555, FIN 555, (MGT 555 or MGT 554) and MKT 555 are prerequisites for this class.

GSB 600 | CANDIDACY CONTINUATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A non-credit registration that allows students to continue to use DePaul facilities such as the library, Career Development Center and the computer lab while not registered for credit-earning courses. (0 quarter hours)

GSB 631 | STRATEGIC FINANCIAL ANALYSIS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed for all MBA students seeking to develop skills in strategic financial analysis. The course provides a deep, unabashed evaluation of corporate performance with a focus on traditional and cash-based measures, and strategic applications. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of various types of financial analyses is a requirement for designing and developing business strategy, business execution systems, and understanding the performance of the company. Key managerial questions will be investigated in the course: When should a business grow? When is growth meaningless to investors? Why does an increase in net income, even over decades, still result in stock price drops? Why do companies report Return On Equity amidst abysmal stock returns? Why and when is stock price BAD for measuring managerial performance? Corporate managers today are plagued by these questions, leaving them to believe in market irrationality, or simply "the market doesn't understand my company". The course will be driven by actual review and evaluation of company financial statements, using several types of practical financial analysis methods and tools. The course provides deep insights into the world of investment analysis, corporate performance measurement, and strategic planning. This course will be useful for MBA candidates destined for higher levels of corporate management, management consulting, investment banking, equity research, or money management.

GSB 640 | PROBLEMS IN ETHICS: ISSUES IN BUSINESS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

A seminar in business ethics that centers on theoretical, practical and pedagogical issues. Cross-listed with PHL 640. Offered variably.

GSB 650 | RELIGIOUS ETHICS AND ECONOMICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course will examine the thinking of social scientists, philosophers and theologians on the impact of religious values and institutions, on the origin and development of American capitalism and its relevance to contemporary business ethics. Cross-listed with PHL 650 and MLS 442. Offered variably.

GSB 793 | INTERNSHIP | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This is a unique opportunity in which knowledge gained in the classroom can be applied to an actual business environment. The intern will be immersed in a stimulating environment with a pool of established resources in industry or government.

GSB 798 | SPECIAL TOPICS | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Content and format of this course is variable. An in-depth study of current issues. Subject matter will be indicated in class schedule.

GSB 799 | INDEPENDENT STUDY | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Available for graduate students of demonstrated capability for intensive independent work in accountancy.

GSB 800 | INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to introduce incoming executive doctoral students to the fundamentals of research methods. The course will begin with an overview of why we do research, the scientific method and causal inference. Students will then learn about the different types of validity and threats to validity. Finally, students will get an overview of different empirical research methods, including surveys, experiments, and analysis of archival data and will discuss the validity trade-offs of these different research methods. (2 quarter hours)

GSB 801 | EMPIRICAL RESEARCH STUDIES | 6 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to teach doctoral students how to design and conduct empirical research studies. The first part of the course will focus on practical aspects of research, such as how to identify a problem, develop a good research question, develop a theory and perform a comprehensive literature review. The second part of the course will build on topics discussed in the Introduction to Research Methods course and further explore the different empirical research methods available to answer business research questions. Specifically, students will learn how to design research studies using process simulations, case/field studies, interviews, focus groups and surveys, experiments, and time-series and cross-sectional archival data. Construct measurement will be emphasized throughout the course. Students will discuss research ethics, with a special emphasis on IRB training and how to ethically perform research using human participants.(6 quarter hours)

GSB 802 | STATISTICS IN BUSINESS RESEARCH | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course presents the basics of using statistics in solving business problems and applications. Students will study several statistical methodologies, such as t-tests, ANOVA, correlation and simple regression analysis. A strong emphasis will be placed on understanding differences between different types of variables, when to use them, how to read them and interpret them. The course focuses on the selection, application, and interpretation of statistical techniques and requires SPSS statistical software to analyze data. Special importance will be given to topics of ethics in empirical research, data analysis and presentation. (4 quarter hours)

GSB 803 | APPLIED MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS | 5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course equips students with the skills needed to analyze data for advanced research using selected statistical techniques such as factor analysis, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, and structural equation modeling. It enables students to apply these statistical techniques to a variety of business areas and problems so students can gain an applications-guided understanding of the statistical theories presented. The class includes topics of model specification, significance determination, nonlinear transformations, residual analysis, normality assessment, and outlier analysis, plus more advanced topics including autocorrelation, multicollinearity, heteroscedasticity and extrapolation. Students will do individual and group projects both in labs and in take-home assignments. The course emphasizes the selection, application, and interpretation of statistical techniques and requires SPSS statistical software to analyze data. (5 quarter hours)

GSB 804 | FORECASTING AND PREDICTION | 3 quarter hours

(Graduate)

In this course, students will study a variety of advanced statistical techniques, such as time series analysis, conjoint analysis, choice models and market diffusion models. The course topics include: autocorrelated data analysis, Box-Jenkins models (autoregressive, moving average, and autoregressive moving average models), analysis of seasonality, forecasting evaluation and diagnostics checking. Students will learn how to set up a conjoint experiment and apply it to setting prices and predicting sales. This course will also discuss approaches to modeling consumer choice behavior, such as logit and nested logit models, and study the relation between consumer choices and price, promotion, advertising, and product innovations and characteristics. All these techniques will be used as tools to predict product diffusion, market shares, and likelihood to purchase. Several datasets will be generated to help with analyzing real life prediction simulations. Students will also review and analyze significant academic publications presenting forecasting and predictive research projects. Learning these statistical methods will be assessed in individual and group exercises, simulation and predictive experiments. (3 quarter hours)

GSB 805 | DATA SCIENCE AND VISUALIZATION | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to familiarize students with data science and data visualization. It explores the boundaries of data science as well as the pipeline for the data science process. Specific topics include but are not limited to data cleaning, broad classes of algorithms in data science, data exploration and communicating of results using data visualization techniques. (2 quarter hours)

GSB 806 | INSTITUTIONAL AND ACADEMIC RESEARCH DISSEMINATION | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

With every project, analysis, business inquiry or research question, new knowledge is generated. In this course, students will discuss ways to create and disseminate this new knowledge both inside a business organization and outside, in the academic and trade media. Students will study how to develop a program of research to gather and create knowledge within various domains of theory and practice. Further, a special focus will be placed on how to position the results of empirical analyses and on how to write for a variety of publishing avenues, such as white papers, academic research journals, or trade publications. Students will be exposed to research on effective writing and will investigate the processes of disseminating the new knowledge for corporate approval and for research funding. (2 quarter hours)

GSB 820 | LEADING ORGANIZATIONS THROUGH PEOPLE | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar is design to develop foundational knowledge of leadership and related but broader organizational behavior research. Students will draw heavily on primary social and organizational psychology theories including, but not limited to: implicit person, attribution, social comparison, social exchange, attention, pro-social motivation, expectancy, goal-setting, job characteristics, and role theories. Students will examine how these fundamental theories shape the context of people, groups and organizations through primary organizational behavior domains including individual differences, motivation, performance, commitment, organizational citizenship, organizational climate, culture and context, power and influence, organizational justice, leader effectiveness, top management team effectiveness, leadership assessment and development.

GSB 821 | CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN FINANCIAL RESEARCH | 3 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to expose students to the prevailing research methods and topics in current financial research. Students will examine various topics throughout this seminar including but not limited to financial governance, corporate finance, behavioral finance, banking, and market efficiencies.

GSB 822 | MARKETING AND BUSINESS STRATEGY | 3 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course surveys major topics in the evolving field of marketing and explores marketing?s role in business strategy across a range of markets and industries. The focus of this doctoral seminar is to provide a critical review of selected scholarly and practitioner literature with an emphasis on their practical applications to organizations today. The course is designed to help doctoral students become conversant in prominent classical and contemporary marketing literature as well as to promote active discussions around major streams of marketing thought applied to current business challenges and opportunities. It also serves as a foundation course to prepare the student for further research and applied work in the areas of marketing and strategy.

GSB 823 | LEADING ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE | 4 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar examines the conceptual underpinnings of organization development and provides exposure to contemporary literature on OD and change. Attention is given to OD practice and evidence-based interventions for managing planned change. Key topics explored include organization theory, foundations of planned organizational change, frames and models in organizational diagnosis, applying open-systems frames to diagnosis, designing major organizational interventions (including group, techno-structural, human process and strategic interventions). Practical attention paid to managing change and institutionalization through consultation/contracting and organizational learning.

GSB 824 | BEHAVIORAL DECISION THEORY | 3 quarter hours

(Graduate)

The goal of this course is to introduce doctoral students to prior research studies in behavioral decision theory. The course will cover seminal papers in the judgment and decision making literature, including those on heuristics and biases, context effects, prospect theory, mental accounting, regression to the mean, pattern seeking, sunk costs, and escalation of commitment. As part of the heuristics and biases topic, students will learn about biases in forecasting and prediction, such as the planning fallacy. Students will be introduced to normative models of belief updating and descriptive evidence on departures from the normative models, such as base rate neglect, belief perseverance, and primacy/recency effects. Finally, the course will cover several topics in psychology that are particularly relevant to business doctoral students: attribution theory, common problems in group decision making (groupthink, social conformity, and social influence), and the development of expertise. (3 quarter hours)

GSB 825 | BUSINESS ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to examine contemporary research on leader and organizational ethics as well as corporate social responsibility. Key topics include corporate social responsibility and stakeholder management, role of business in society, environmental sustainability, corporate governance, accounting and finance, technology and privacy, employer responsibilities and employee rights. (2 quarter hours)

GSB 826 | SEMINARS ON CURRENT TOPICS IN BUSINESS | 1 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This annually repeating seminar series is designed to examine contemporary issues in business from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Through these seminars, students will develop the ability to critically evaluate published business-related research, study current business problems, identify the theoretical models needed to research these problems and perform the necessary empirical analyses to offer solutions to the research problem and managerial insights for industry applications. Early in the program, the seminars serve the important function of highlighting open research questions and introducing students to research active faculty who might be selected as their dissertation chair. In the final half of the program, the seminar series serves the equally important function of keeping the students engaged in issues relevant to their own interests. Each seminar will vary in length, depending upon the duration required to cover the topic. In order to keep the seminar series topical, seminars will be rotated based upon their relevance to the current business environment and cohort interest. (1-5 quarter hours)

GSB 827 | SEMINARS ON CURRENT TOPICS IN BUSINESS | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This annually repeating seminar series is designed to examine contemporary issues in business from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Through these seminars, students will develop the ability to critically evaluate published business-related research, study current business problems, identify the theoretical models needed to research these problems and perform the necessary empirical analyses to offer solutions to the research problem and managerial insights for industry applications. Early in the program, the seminars serve the important function of highlighting open research questions and introducing students to research active faculty who might be selected as their dissertation chair. In the final half of the program, the seminar series serves the equally important function of keeping the students engaged in issues relevant to their own interests. Each seminar will vary in length, depending upon the duration required to cover the topic. In order to keep the seminar series topical, seminars will be rotated based upon their relevance to the current business environment and cohort interest. (1-5 quarter hours)

GSB 828 | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar provides exposure to leading edge qualitative research methods as they emerge in practice and research.

GSB 829 | DEVELOPMENTS IN ACCOUNTING RESEARCH | 3 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This seminar provides exposure to leading edge research topics in accounting.

GSB 840 | GROUP RESEARCH LAB I | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to help students engage with the entire research process, taking a research idea from conception to completion. Students are assigned to small groups and work with a faculty advisor to promote mastery in research method design and execution. The project culminates in a written manuscript and presentation to colleagues and faculty. (2 quarter hours)

GSB 841 | GROUP RESEARCH LAB II | 2 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This course is designed to help students engage with the entire research process, taking a research idea from conception to completion. Students are assigned to small groups and work with a faculty advisor to promote mastery in research method design and execution. The project culminates in a written manuscript and presentation to colleagues and faculty. (2 quarter hours)

GSB 842 | DISSERTATION PROPOSAL LAB | 5 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This research lab is designed to provide regular meetings with students' dissertation chair in preparation of the dissertation proposal.

GSB 843 | DISSERTATION LAB II | 8 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Dissertation lab designed to help students pursue their dissertation area of study. This class is part two of a two-part class. (8 quarter hours)

GSB 898 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN RESEARCH | 2-3 quarter hours

(Graduate)

This special topics seminar provides exposure to leading edge research methods and statistics as they emerge in practice and research. (2 -3 quarter hours)

GSB 899 | CANDIDACY CONTINUATION | 0 quarter hours

(Graduate)

Students admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree who have completed all course requirements are required to be registered each quarter of the academic year until the dissertation has been completed. (0 credit hours)